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[PMID]:29386359
[Au] Autor:Platt DJ; Smith AM; Arora N; Diamond MS; Coyne CB; Miner JJ
[Ad] Dirección:Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
[Ti] Título:Zika virus-related neurotropic flaviviruses infect human placental explants and cause fetal demise in mice.
[So] Fuente:Sci Transl Med;10(426), 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1946-6242
[Cp] País de publicación:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:Although Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women can cause placental damage, intrauterine growth restriction, microcephaly, and fetal demise, these disease manifestations only became apparent in the context of a large epidemic in the Americas. We hypothesized that ZIKV is not unique among arboviruses in its ability to cause congenital infection. To evaluate this, we tested the capacity of four emerging arboviruses [West Nile virus (WNV), Powassan virus (POWV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and Mayaro virus (MAYV)] from related (flavivirus) and unrelated (alphavirus) genera to infect the placenta and fetus in immunocompetent, wild-type mice. Although all four viruses caused placental infection, only infection with the neurotropic flaviviruses (WNV and POWV) resulted in fetal demise. WNV and POWV also replicated efficiently in second-trimester human maternal (decidua) and fetal (chorionic villi and fetal membrane) explants, whereas CHIKV and MAYV replicated less efficiently. In mice, RNA in situ hybridization and histopathological analysis revealed that WNV infected the placenta and fetal central nervous system, causing injury to the developing brain. In comparison, CHIKV and MAYV did not cause substantive placental or fetal damage despite evidence of vertical transmission. On the basis of the susceptibility of human maternal and fetal tissue explants and pathogenesis experiments in immunocompetent mice, other emerging neurotropic flaviviruses may share with ZIKV the capacity for transplacental transmission, as well as subsequent infection and injury to the developing fetus.
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1802
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180311
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


  2 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29331320
[Au] Autor:Luo H; Winkelmann ER; Fernandez-Salas I; Li L; Mayer SV; Danis-Lozano R; Sanchez-Casas RM; Vasilakis N; Tesh R; Barrett AD; Weaver SC; Wang T
[Ad] Dirección:Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.
[Ti] Título:Zika, dengue and yellow fever viruses induce differential anti-viral immune responses in human monocytic and first trimester trophoblast cells.
[So] Fuente:Antiviral Res;151:55-62, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9096
[Cp] País de publicación:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus associated with severe neonatal birth defects, but the causative mechanism is incompletely understood. ZIKV shares sequence homology and early clinical manifestations with yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue virus (DENV) and are all transmitted in urban cycles by the same species of mosquitoes. However, YFV and DENV have been rarely reported to cause congenital diseases. Here, we compared infection with a contemporary ZIKV strain (FSS13025) to YFV17D and DENV-4 in human monocytic cells (THP-1) and first-trimester trophoblasts (HTR-8). Our results suggest that all three viruses have similar tropisms for both cells. Nevertheless, ZIKV induced strong type 1 IFN and inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, ZIKV infection in trophoblasts induced lower IFN and higher inflammatory immune responses. Placental inflammation is known to contribute to the risk of brain damage in preterm newborns. Inhibition of toll-like receptor (TLR)3 and TLR8 each abrogated the inflammatory cytokine responses in ZIKV-infected trophoblasts. Our findings identify a potential link between maternal immune activation and ZIKV-induced congenital diseases, and a potential therapeutic strategy that targets TLR-mediated inflammatory responses in the placenta.
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1801
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180311
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


  3 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29523447
[Au] Autor:Britt WJ
[Ad] Dirección:Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Childrens Hospital Harbor Bldg 160, Birmingham, AL 35233. Electronic address: wbritt@peds.uab.edu.
[Ti] Título:Adverse outcomes of pregnancy-associated Zika virus infection.
[So] Fuente:Semin Perinatol;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1558-075X
[Cp] País de publicación:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:The spread of Zika virus to the Americas was accompanied by surge in the number of infants with CNS abnormalities leading to a declaration of a health emergency by the WHO. This was accompanied by significant responses from governmental health agencies in the United States and Europe that resulted in significant new information described in the natural history of this perinatal infection in a very short period of time. Although much has been learned about Zika virus infection during pregnancy, limitations of current diagnostics and the challenges for accurate serologic diagnosis of acute Zika virus infection has restricted our understanding of the natural history of this perinatal infection to infants born to women with clinical disease during pregnancy and to Zika exposed infants with obvious clinical stigmata of disease. Thus, the spectrum of disease in infants exposed to Zika virus during pregnancy remains to be defined. In contrast, observations in informative animal models of Zika virus infections have provided rational pathways for vaccine development and existing antiviral drug development programs for other flaviviruses have resulted in accelerated development for potential antiviral therapies. This brief review will highlight some of the current concepts of the natural history of Zika virus during pregnancy.
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1803
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180310
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


  4 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29522736
[Au] Autor:Grubaugh ND; Faria NR; Andersen KG; Pybus OG
[Ad] Dirección:Department of Immunology and Microbiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
[Ti] Título:Genomic Insights into Zika Virus Emergence and Spread.
[So] Fuente:Cell;172(6):1160-1162, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4172
[Cp] País de publicación:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:The emergence and spread of Zika virus in the Americas continues to challenge our disease surveillance systems. Virus genome sequencing during the epidemic uncovered the timescale of Zika virus transmission and spread. Yet, we are only beginning to explore how genomics can enhance our responses to emerging viruses.
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1803
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180309
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


  5 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29454734
[Au] Autor:Benelli G; Duggan MF
[Ad] Dirección:Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, via del Borghetto 80, 56124, Pisa, Italy; The BioRobotics Institute, Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, viale Rinaldo Piaggio 34, 56025, Pontedera, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: benelli.giovanni@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Management of arthropod vector data - Social and ecological dynamics facing the One Health perspective.
[So] Fuente:Acta Trop;182:80-91, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] País de publicación:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are spread by direct and/or indirect contacts between a pathogen or parasite and their hosts. Arthropod vectors have evolved as excellent bloodsuckers, providing an elegant transportation mode for a wide number of infectious agents. The nature of pathogen and parasite transfer and the models used to predict how a disease might spread are magnified in complexity when an arthropod vector is part of the disease cycle. One Health is a worldwide strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for humans, animals and the environment. It would benefit from a structured analysis to address vectoring of arthropod-borne diseases as a dynamic transactional process. This review focused on how arthropod vector data can be used to better model and predict zoonotic disease outbreaks. With enhanced knowledge to describe arthropod vector disease transfer, researchers will have a better understanding about how to model disease outbreaks. As public health research evolves to include more social-ecological systems, the roles of society, ecology, epidemiology, pathogen/parasite evolution and animal behavior can be better captured in the research design. Overall, because of more collaborative data collection processes on arthropod vectors, disease modeling can better predict conditions where EIDs will occur.
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1802
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180309
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180309
[St] Status:Publisher


  6 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29425967
[Au] Autor:Alkhaibari AM; Maffeis T; Bull JC; Butt TM
[Ad] Dirección:Department of Biosciences, College of Science, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, United Kingdom; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Tabuk University, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Título:Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum, and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?
[So] Fuente:J Invertebr Pathol;153:38-50, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0805
[Cp] País de publicación:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:Mosquitoes transmit several diseases, which are of global significance (malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Zika). The geographic range of mosquitoes is increasing due to climate change, tourism and trade. Both conidial and blastospore formulations of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum ARSEF 4556, are being investigated as mosquito larvicides. However, concerns have been raised over possible non-target impacts to arthropod mosquito predators such as larvae of Toxorhynchites brevipalpis which feed on larvae of mosquito vector species. Laboratory-based, small container bioassays showed, that T. bevipalpis larvae are susceptible to relatively high concentrations (i.e. ≥10 spores ml ) of inoculum with blastospores being significantly more virulent than conidia. At lower concentrations (e.g. <10 spores ml ), it appears that M. brunneum complements T. brevipalpis resulting in higher control than if either agent was used alone. At a concentration of 10 spores ml , the LT of for conidia and blastospores alone was 5.64 days (95% CI: 4.79-6.49 days) and 3.89 days (95% CI: 3.53-4.25 days), respectively. In combination with T. brevipalpis, this was reduced to 3.15 days (95% CI: 2.82-3.48 days) and 2.82 days (95% CI: 2.55-3.08 days). Here, combined treatment with the fungus and predator was beneficial but weaker than additive. At 10 and 10 blastospores ml , mosquito larval mortality was mostly due to the fungal pathogen when the predator was combined with blastospores. However, with conidia, the effects of combined treatment were additive/synergistic at these high concentrations. Optimisation of fungal concentration and formulation will reduce: (1) risk to the predator and (2) application rates and costs of M. brunneum for control of mosquito larvae.
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1802
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180309
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180309
[St] Status:Publisher


  7 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29339059
[Au] Autor:Chan K; Wong PY; Parikh C; Wong S
[Ad] Dirección:AI Biosciences, Inc., College Station, TX 77845, USA.
[Ti] Título:Moving toward rapid and low-cost point-of-care molecular diagnostics with a repurposed 3D printer and RPA.
[So] Fuente:Anal Biochem;545:4-12, 2018 Jan 12.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0309
[Cp] País de publicación:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:Traditionally, the majority of nucleic acid amplification-based molecular diagnostic tests are done in centralized settings. In recent years, point-of-care tests have been developed for use in low-resource settings away from central laboratories. While most experts agree that point-of-care molecular tests are greatly needed, their availability as cost-effective and easy-to-operate tests remains an unmet goal. In this article, we discuss our efforts to develop a recombinase polymerase amplification reaction-based test that will meet these criteria. First, we describe our efforts in repurposing a low-cost 3D printer as a platform that can carry out medium-throughput, rapid, and high-performing nucleic acid extraction. Next, we address how these purified templates can be rapidly amplified and analyzed using the 3D printer's heated bed or the deconstructed, low-cost thermal cycler we have developed. In both approaches, real-time isothermal amplification and detection of template DNA or RNA can be accomplished using a low-cost portable detector or smartphone camera. Last, we demonstrate the capability of our technologies using foodborne pathogens and the Zika virus. Our low-cost approach does not employ complicated and high-cost components, making it suitable for resource-limited settings. When integrated and commercialized, it will offer simple sample-to-answer molecular diagnostics.
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1801
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180309
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180309
[St] Status:Publisher


  8 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29030319
[Au] Autor:Dutta S; Celestine MJ; Khanal S; Huddleston A; Simms C; Arca JF; Mitra A; Heller L; Kraj PJ; Ledizet M; Anderson JF; Neelakanta G; Holder AA; Sultana H
[Ad] Dirección:Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA.
[Ti] Título:Coordination of different ligands to copper(II) and cobalt(III) metal centers enhances Zika virus and dengue virus loads in both arthropod cells and human keratinocytes.
[So] Fuente:Biochim Biophys Acta;1862(1):40-50, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:0006-3002
[Cp] País de publicación:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:Trace elements such as copper and cobalt have been associated with virus-host interactions. However, studies to show the effect of conjugation of copper(II) or cobalt(III) metal centers to thiosemicarbazone ligand(s) derived from either food additives or mosquito repellent such as 2-acetylethiazole or citral, respectively, on Zika virus (ZIKV) or dengue virus (serotype 2; DENV2) infections have not been explored. In this study, we show that four compounds comprising of thiosemicarbazone ligand derived from 2-acetylethiazole viz., (E)-N-ethyl-2-[1-(thiazol-2-yl)ethylidene]hydrazinecarbothioamide (acetylethTSC) (compound 1), a copper(II) complex with acetylethTSC as a ligand (compound 2), a thiosemicarbazone ligand-derived from citral (compound 3) and a cobalt(III) complex with a citral-thiosemicarbazone ligand (compound 4) increased DENV2 and ZIKV replication in both mosquito C6/36 cells and human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Treatment of both cell lines with compounds 2 or 4 showed increased dengue viral titers at all three tested doses. Enhanced dengue viral plaque formation was also noted at the tested dose of 100µM, suggesting higher production of infectious viral particles. Treatment with the compounds 2 or 4 enhanced ZIKV and DENV2 RNA levels in HeLa cell line and primary cultures of mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells. Also, pre- or post treatments with conjugated compounds 2 or 4 showed higher loads of ZIKV or DENV2 envelope (E) protein in HaCaT cells. No changes in loads of E-protein were found in ZIKV-infected C6/36 cells, when compounds were treated after infection. In addition, we tested bis(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) chloride ([Cu(phen) ]Cl , (compound 5) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline)cobalt(III) chloride ([Co(phen) ]Cl , (compound 6) that also showed enhanced DENV2 loads. Also, we found that copper(II) chloride dehydrate (CuCl ·2H O) or cobalt(II) chloride hexahydrate (CoCl ·6H O) alone had no effects as "free" cations. Taken together, these findings suggest that use of Cu(II) or Co(III) conjugation to organic compounds, in insect repellents and/or food additives could enhance DENV2/ZIKV loads in human cells and perhaps induce pathogenesis in infected individuals or individuals pre-exposed to such conjugated complexes. IMPORTANCE: Mosquito-borne diseases are of great concern to the mankind. Use of chemicals/repellents against mosquito bites and transmission of microbes has been the topic of interest for many years. Here, we show that thiosemicarbazone ligand(s) derived from 2-acetylethiazole or citral or 1,10-phenanthroline upon conjugation with copper(II) or cobalt(III) metal centers enhances dengue virus (serotype 2; DENV2) and/or Zika virus (ZIKV) infections in mosquito, mouse and human cells. Enhanced ZIKV/DENV2 capsid mRNA or envelope protein loads were evident in mosquito cells and human keratinocytes, when treated with compounds before/after infections. Also, treatment with copper(II) or cobalt(III) conjugated compounds increased viral titers and number of plaque formations. These studies suggest that conjugation of compounds in repellents/essential oils/natural products/food additives with copper(II) or cobalt(III) metal centers may not be safe, especially in tropical and subtropical places, where several dengue infection cases and deaths are reported annually or in places with increased ZIKV caused microcephaly.
[Mh] Términos MeSH primario: Cobalto
Complejos de Coordinación
Cobre
Virus del Dengue/metabolismo
Queratinocitos/virología
Carga Viral/efectos de los fármacos
Virus Zika/metabolismo
[Mh] Términos MeSH secundario: Animales
Cercopithecus aethiops
Cobalto/química
Cobalto/farmacología
Complejos de Coordinación/química
Complejos de Coordinación/farmacología
Cobre/química
Cobre/farmacología
Culicidae
Células HeLa
Seres Humanos
Queratinocitos/metabolismo
Queratinocitos/patología
Células Vero
Proteínas del Envoltorio Viral
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Nombre de substancia:
0 (Coordination Complexes); 0 (Viral Envelope Proteins); 3G0H8C9362 (Cobalt); 789U1901C5 (Copper)
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1803
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180309
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Fecha de ingreso para procesamiento:171015
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29521099
[Au] Autor:Al-Obaidi MMJ; Bahadoran A; Wang SM; Manikam R; Raju CS; Sekaran SD
[Ti] Título:Disruption of the blood brain barrier is vital property of neurotropic viral infection of the central nervous system.
[So] Fuente:Acta Virol;62(1):16-27, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:0001-723X
[Cp] País de publicación:Slovakia
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumen:The blood brain barrier consisting of astrocytes, pericytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses by controlling the access of circulating molecules, immune cells or viruses into the central nervous system (CNS). However, this barrier is not impenetrable and neuroviruses have evolved to disrupt and evade it. This review aims to describe the underlying entry mechanisms of several neuroviruses such as (Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), West Nile virus (WNV), Zika virus (ZIKV), Nipah virus (NiV), Rabies virus (RABV), Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)) into the CNS through BBB disruption. The mechanisms, through which neurotropic viruses enter the BBB, are being studied and are becoming clearer, however, some aspects still remain unknown. Some of these viruses are able to invade the brain parenchyma by a 'Trojan horse' mechanism, through diapedesis of infected immune cells that either cross the BBB paracellularly or transcellularly. Important mechanisms of BBB disruption associated with paracellular entry of viruses include alterations in expression or phosphorylation of tight junction proteins, disruption of the basal lamina and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of such mechanisms, indirect effects of viruses on the immune system are likely causes of barrier disruption.
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1803
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180309
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4149/av_2018_102


  10 / 4085 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29519697
[Au] Autor:Siedner MJ; Ryan ET; Bogoch II
[Ad] Dirección:Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Faculty of Medicine, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda. Electronic address: msiedner@mgh.harvard.edu.
[Ti] Título:Gone or forgotten? The rise and fall of Zika virus.
[So] Fuente:Lancet Public Health;3(3):e109-e110, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2468-2667
[Cp] País de publicación:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Pt] Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mes de ingreso:1803
[Cu] Fecha actualización por clase:180309
[Lr] Fecha última revisión:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review



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