Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Acanthamoeba and Keratitis [Words]
References found : 1613 [refine]
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  1 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29274209
[Au] Autor:Baltaza W; Padzik M; Szaflik JP; Dybicz M; Hendiger E; Chomicz L
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Biology, Medical University of Warsaw, ul. Nowogrodzka 73, 02-018 Warsaw, Poland
[Ti] Title:Amoebicidal or amoebostatic influence of disinfectants used in health facilities and laboratories on corneal strains of Acanthamoeba
[So] Source:Ann Parasitol;63(3):167-172, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2299-0631
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Different Acanthamoeba species are amphizoic organisms distributed in wide range of habitats in natural and man-made environments; they are also detected on surfaces of equipment and accessories in health facilities. Some strains of the amoebae are causative agents of the vision-threatening human disease Acanthamoeba keratitis, mainly reported in contact lens wearers. An exceptional high resistance of Acanthamoeba trophozoites and particularly cysts to chemicals, disinfectants and drugs is believed as influencing difficulty resulting in unsuccessful therapeutic management. As Acanthamoeba keratitis is the serious medical problem worldwide, different chemicals with possible activity against environmental and clinical Acanthamoeba strains are tested. In our study, selected disinfectants used in health care settings and laboratories were tested and their efficacy against the corneal strains Acanthamoeba castellanii and A. polyphaga , and environmental A. castellanii Neff strain was assessed. Comparative assessment of results of the assays show that, apart from amoebistatic effects, the disinfectants indicated expected cysticidal efficacy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acanthamoeba Keratitis/parasitology
Acanthamoeba/drug effects
Amebicides/pharmacology
Disinfectants/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Amebicides); 0 (Disinfectants)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171224
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.17420/ap6303.102

  2 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505068
[Au] Autor:Antonelli A; Favuzza E; Galano A; Montalbano Di Filippo M; Ciccone N; Berrilli F; Mencucci R; Di Cave D; Rossolini GM
[Ad] Address:Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Regional spread of contact lens-related Acanthamoeba keratitis in Italy.
[So] Source:New Microbiol;41(1):83-85, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1121-7138
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acanthamoeba ocular infections, known as Acanthamoeba keratitis, are an emerging problem among contact lens wearers. Infections mediated by Acanthamoeba are uncommon, but they can be underestimated due to poor awareness and delayed diagnosis. The routine use of rapid and cost-effective molecular methods like Real Time PCR for the diagnosis of this important pathogen could improve diagnosis and therapy outcome. This report describes the detection by Real Time PCR assay of six T4 and one T3 Acanthamoeba infections, as the first reported cases in Tuscany, Italy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501695
[Au] Autor:Montoya A; Miró G; Saugar JM; Fernández B; Checa R; Gálvez R; Bailo B; Marino V; Piñero JE; Lorenzo-Morales J; Fuentes I
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Parasitología, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, ISCIII, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain; Dpto de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, UCM, Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Detection and molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba spp. in stray cats from Madrid, Spain.
[So] Source:Exp Parasitol;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2449
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acanthamoeba spp. is a widespread protozoan that has been isolated from air, dust, soil, water and biological samples. An opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals, it may cause ocular keratitis, encephalitis, and even multisystem disease. The frequency of Acanthamoeba in animals is unknown. The aim of present study was determine the presence of Acanthamoeba spp. in immunocompromised stray cats - animals possibly more likely to harbour the infection given their immunocompromised status and frequenting of contaminated environments. Of 307 cats examined, 55 were positive for feline immunodeficiency virus and/or feline leukaemia virus and therefore included in the study. Corneal scrapings were obtained to isolate Acanthamoeba spp. by culture and molecular detection by conventional and real time PCR. None of the samples examined directly by molecular methods were positive for Acanthamoeba spp. However, two (3.6%) cases of the cultured samples provided positive results, which were confirmed by subsequent molecular analysis. Sequencing assigned one isolate to genotype T4 and the other to T2. Since Acanthamoeba spp. may also infect animals and humans, the present findings may raise some public health and veterinary concerns.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29412494
[Au] Autor:McKelvie J; Alshiakhi M; Ziaei M; Patel DV; McGhee CN
[Ad] Address:The Department of Ophthalmology, New Zealand National Eye Centre, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:The rising tide of Acanthamoeba keratitis in Auckland, New Zealand: a 7-year review of presentation, diagnosis and outcomes (2009-2016).
[So] Source:Clin Exp Ophthalmol;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1442-9071
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:IMPORTANCE: Acanthamoeba is an increasingly prevalent cause of vision-threatening microbial keratitis. BACKGROUND: To assess the incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and outcomes of patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) in Auckland, New Zealand over a 7-year period. DESIGN: Retrospective observational consecutive case series. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-eight eyes of 52 patients diagnosed with AK. METHODS: All cases of AK were identified using a cross-referenced search of clinical, laboratory and pharmacy records from March 2009 to May 2016. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic and clinical data were collected including age, gender, risk factors, clinical manifestations, initial diagnosis, diagnostic investigations, treatment, presenting and final visual acuity and surgical interventions. RESULTS: Contact lens (CL) use was noted in 96% of unilateral and 100% of bilateral cases. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 21 days and the mean duration from presentation to definitive diagnosis was 14 days. Initial diagnosis was recorded as CL-related keratitis in 70.6%, viral keratitis in 15.5% and AK in 12.0%. The diagnosis was confirmed with In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) in 67.2%, corneal scrape in 22.4%, corneal biopsy in 1.7% and clinically in 8.6%. IVCM sensitivity was 83.0%. Surgical intervention was required in four patients, all with delayed diagnosis (range 63-125 days). The incidence of AK has more than doubled when compared with the preceding 7-year period. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: AK is a rare vision-threatening protozoal infection with rapidly-increasing incidence in New Zealand, predominantly affecting CL users. Diagnosis is often challenging and when delayed is associated with worse outcomes. IVCM offers rapid diagnosis with high sensitivity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ceo.13166

  5 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29344802
[Au] Autor:Megha K; Sharma M; Gupta A; Sehgal R; Khurana S
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Parasitology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.
[Ti] Title:Protein profiling of Acanthamoeba species using MALDI-TOF MS for specific identification of Acanthamoeba genotype.
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;117(3):729-736, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acanthamoeba spp. are ubiquitous in the environment and have the potential to cause severe infections. The different genotypes of Acanthamoeba have been shown to influence the severity of the disease and response to therapy. Characterizing Acanthamoeba spp. upto genotype can aid in infection control practices. Twenty-five Acanthamoeba isolates, characterized by 18S rDNA sequencing, were subjected to MALDI-TOF MS analysis by creating a database for the individual genotypes. The differentiating features of the various spectra were observed; the coded samples were then tested against the created database. The results of identification were compared with sequencing. Five different genotypes were obtained-T3, T4, T5, T10, and T11. Spectral analysis revealed genus-specific and genotype-specific peaks. The peak patterns for individual genotype were discrete and reproducible. Clinical isolates produced different peaks from the environmental isolate of the same genotype. A concordance of 92% was obtained with MALDI-TOF MS in comparison with 18sDNA sequencing. MALDI-TOF MS, once optimized, has the potential to reliably identify the genotype of Acanthamoeba spp. and to differentiate clinical isolate from mere contaminant.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-017-5743-0

  6 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500874
[Au] Autor:Batista A; Breunig HG; König A; Schindele A; Hager T; Seitz B; König K
[Ad] Address:Saarland University, Department of Biophotonics and Laser Technology, Saarbrücken, Germany.
[Ti] Title:High-resolution, label-free two-photon imaging of diseased human corneas.
[So] Source:J Biomed Opt;23(3):1-8, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1560-2281
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The diagnosis of corneal diseases may be improved by monitoring the metabolism of cells and the structural organization of the stroma using two-photon imaging (TPI). We used TPI to assess the differences between nonpathological (NP) human corneas and corneas diagnosed with either keratoconus, Acanthamoeba keratitis, or stromal corneal scars. Images were acquired using a custom-built five-dimensional laser-scanning microscope with a broadband sub-15 femtosecond near-infrared pulsed excitation laser and a 16-channel photomultiplier tube detector in combination with a time-correlated single photon counting module. Morphological alterations of epithelial cells were observed for all pathologies. Moreover, diseased corneas showed alterations to the cells' metabolism that were revealed using the NAD(P)H free to protein-bound ratios. The mean autofluorescence lifetime of the stroma and the organization of the collagen fibers were also significantly altered due to the pathologies. We demonstrate that TPI can be used to distinguish between NP and diseased human corneas, based not only on alterations of the cells' morphology, which can also be evaluated using current clinical devices, but on additional morphological and functional features such as the organization of the stroma and the cells' metabolism. Therefore, TPI could become an efficient tool for diagnosing corneal diseases and better understanding the biological processes of the diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1117/1.JBO.23.3.036002

  7 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29256983
[Au] Autor:Goh JWY; Harrison R; Hau S; Alexander CL; Tole DM; Avadhanam VS
[Ad] Address:Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of In Vivo Confocal Microscopy, PCR and Culture of Corneal Scrapes in the Diagnosis of Acanthamoeba Keratitis.
[So] Source:Cornea;37(4):480-485, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4798
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is an uncommon but serious corneal infection, in which delayed diagnosis carries a poor prognosis. Conventional culture requires a long incubation period and has low sensitivity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) are available alternative diagnostic modalities that have increasing clinical utility. This study compares confocal microscopy, PCR, and corneal scrape culture in the early diagnosis of AK. METHODS: We reviewed the case notes of patients with a differential diagnosis of AK between June 2016 and February 2017 at the Bristol Eye Hospital, United Kingdom. Clinical features at presentation, and results of IVCM, PCR, and corneal scrape cultures were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 25 case records were reviewed. AK was diagnosed in 14 patients (15 eyes). Based on the definition of "definite AK," the diagnostic sensitivities of IVCM, PCR, and corneal scrape cultures were 100% [95% confidence interval (CI), 63.1%-100%], 71.4% (95% CI, 41.9%-91.6%) and 33.3% (95% CI, 9.9%-65.1%), respectively. The 3 methods showed a specificity of 100% and a positive predictive value of 100%. Using a reference standard of only positive corneal cultures, IVCM, and PCR had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 29.2%-100%) and 75% (95% CI, 19.4%-99.4%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: All 3 diagnostic tests are highly specific, and a positive test result is highly predictive of disease presence. IVCM is both highly sensitive and specific when performed by an experienced operator. PCR is a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of AK because of its wider availability compared with IVCM, and it may be used in combination with IVCM for microbiologic confirmation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICO.0000000000001497

  8 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29332157
[Au] Autor:Dos Santos DL; Kwitko S; Marinho DR; de Araújo BS; Locatelli CI; Rott MB
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Department of Parasitology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Sarmento Leite Street, N 500, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Acanthamoeba keratitis in Porto Alegre (southern Brazil): 28 cases and risk factors.
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;117(3):747-750, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The increasing use of contact lenses worldwide has led to an increase in cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis, which are often associated with inappropriate cleaning of contact lenses and lens cases. This study aimed to retrospectively review 28 cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis in Porto Alegre (southern Brazil) and identify the risk factors and clinical outcomes of affected patients. Most patients had higher education (66.6%), all were users of contact lenses, mostly women (67.9%). Most patients were soft contact lens wearers (66.7%) and 85.7% used multipurpose cleaning solutions. Sixteen patients (64.0%) used to wear contact lenses while swimming and/or bathing. Pain was the most common symptom (92.6%). For treatment, patients used polyhexamethylene biguanide drops (92.6%), propamidine isethionate drops (81.5%), chlorhexidine drops (55.6%), topical corticosteroids (63.0%), and systemic corticosteroids (37.0%). Herpes simplex keratitis was the most common misdiagnosis (72.7%). The majority of patients (76.0%) underwent a corneal transplant to control the disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-017-5745-y

  9 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29490392
[Au] Autor:Schmack I; Müller M; Kohnen T
[Ti] Title:Mikrobielle Keratitis ­ Teil 2: mykotische und Akanthamöbenkeratitiden. [Microbial keratitis - part 2: Specific aspects of mycotic and acanthamoeba keratitis].
[So] Source:Klin Monbl Augenheilkd;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1439-3999
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1055/a-0483-4214

  10 / 1613 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29490391
[Au] Autor:Schmack I; Müller M; Kohnen T
[Ti] Title:Mikrobielle Keratitis, Teil 1: allgemeine Aspekte und bakterielle Keratitiden. [Microbial keratitis: Understand, recognize, and treat - part 1: General aspects and characteristics of bacterial keratitis].
[So] Source:Klin Monbl Augenheilkd;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1439-3999
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Infectious inflammation of the cornea (microbial keratitis) represents a potentially vision threatening disease. Depending on the infectious agent and the course of the disease it can result in a complete loss of the involved eye. Early diagnosis and accurate treatment are mandatory to maintain a sufficient visual acuity. The purpose of this review is to highlight and discuss characteristic clinical features, diagnostic procedures, and therapeutic aspects of three major forms of microbial keratitis (bacteria, fungi, and acanthamoeba; the latter two in the 2nd part of this article).
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0044-101286


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