Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Acinetobacter and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29505819
[Au] Autor:Abdollahi S; Rasooli I; Mousavi Gargari SL
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:The role of TonB-dependent copper receptor in virulence of Acinetobacter baumannii.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:181-190, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic gram negative pathogen that can adhere to different surfaces and cause different nosocomial infections. To investigate the role of TonB-dependent copper receptor, an outer membrane protein, in virulence of A. baumannii, we deleted this receptor from A. baumannii chromosome. There was a significant decrease in biofilm formation by copper receptor deficient mutant strain. Similarly, the adherence to human epithelial cell and the hydrophobicity were declined. The survival rate of the mutant strain in human sera was reduced while no change was observed in motility of strains. In murine pneumonia model, the bacterial lethal dose 0 (LD ), LD and LD were increased for mutant strain. Moreover, in vivo and in vitro experiments revealed changes in growth rate and dissemination of mutant strain; so that the bacterial load of the mutant was significantly reduced in the spleen and lung. The findings suggest a critical role for TonB-dependent copper receptor in virulence of A. baumannii.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29410025
[Au] Autor:Vijayakumar S; S BA; Kanthan K; Veeraraghavan B
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore 632 004, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:Whole-genome shotgun sequences of seven colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from bacteraemia.
[So] Source:J Glob Antimicrob Resist;12:155-156, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:2213-7173
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen responsible for various infections, including bloodstream infections, meningitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia. It is resistant to most antimicrobial agents, including colistin, and the development of colistin-resistant A. baumannii is of serious concern in the hospital setting. In this study, the whole-genome shotgun sequences of seven colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates from bloodstream infections were characterised. METHODS: Colistin susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution. Whole genomes of all seven isolates were sequenced using an Ion Torrent™ PGM platform with 400-bp chemistry. RESULTS: All seven isolates were confirmed to be resistant to colistin, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 8µg/mL to 64µg/mL. Various antimicrobial resistance genes were present. The mcr1-5 genes were absent in all seven isolates. Chromosomal mutations that could be responsible for colistin resistance were observed. Six isolates belonged to ST848 and one isolate belonged to ST451. CONCLUSION: Increased colistin resistance among clinical isolates of A. baumannii is alarming. Several mutations that could be responsible for colistin resistance were observed in all seven isolates. However, the significant contribution of these mutations requires further confirmation. However, genome information for these colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates will be helpful for further comparative analysis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524060
[Au] Autor:Lima WG; Alves MC; Cruz WS; Paiva MC
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, Central-West Campus Dona Lindu, Federal University of São João del-Rei, Rua Sebastião Gonçalves Coelho, 400, Divinopolis, Minas Gerais, 35501-293, Brazil. williamgustavo_1992@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Chromosomally encoded and plasmid-mediated polymyxins resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii: a huge public health threat.
[So] Source:Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1435-4373
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial and community infections of great clinical relevance. Its ability to rapidly develop resistance to antimicrobials, especially carbapenems, has re-boosted the prescription and use of polymyxins. However, the emergence of strains resistant to these antimicrobials is becoming a critical issue in several regions of the world because very few of currently available antibiotics are effective in these cases. This review summarizes the most up-to-date knowledge about chromosomally encoded and plasmid-mediated polymyxins resistance in A. baumannii. Different mechanisms are employed by A. baumannii to overcome the antibacterial effects of polymyxins. Modification of the outer membrane through phosphoethanolamine addition, loss of lipopolysaccharide, symmetric rupture, metabolic changes affecting osmoprotective amino acids, and overexpression of efflux pumps are involved in this process. Several genetic elements modulate these mechanisms, but only three of them have been described so far in A. baumannii clinical isolates such as mutations in pmrCAB, lpxACD, and lpsB. Elucidation of genotypic profiles and resistance mechanisms are necessary for control and fight against resistance to polymyxins in A. baumannii, thereby protecting this class for future treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10096-018-3223-9

  4 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522784
[Au] Autor:Alves Braga I; Amaral de Campos P; Pinto Gontijo Filho P; Marques Ribas R
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Multi-Hospital Point Prevalence Study of Healthcare-Associated Infections in 28 Adult Intensive Care Units in Brazil.
[So] Source:J Hosp Infect;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2939
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) represents a major problem for patient safety worldwide. AIM: To provide an up-to-date picture of the extent, aetiology, risk factors and patterns of infections in intensive care units (ICUs) in 28 Brazilian hospitals of different sizes. METHODS: A one-day point prevalence survey in 2016 enrolled the ICU of hospitals from the 12 meso regions located in the State of Minas Gerais, Southeast region of Brazil. Hospitals were classified as university or non-university hospitals. All patients with >48h of admission to the study ICUs at the time of the survey were included. FINDINGS: We studied 303 patients, of whom 155 (51.2%) were infected; 123 (79.4%) of these had at least one ICU-acquired infection. The most frequent ICU-acquired infections were pneumonia (53.0%) and bloodstream infection (27.6%).119 bacterial isolates were cultured, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii 27.1%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27.1%, and Staphylococcus aureus 39.0%. According to type of infection, the commonest pathogens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.4%) in pneumonia, coagulase-negative staphylococci (23.4%) and Enterobacteriaceae (23.4%) in bloodstream infections and Enterobacteriaceae in urinary tract infections. CONCLUSION: Our study found that the overall prevalence of ICU-acquired infections in surveyed Brazilian hospitals was higher than that reported in most European countries and the USA. A greater proportion of infections were caused by non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria. These observations, along with a high rate of antimicrobial use, illustrates the urgent need for HAIs to be a priority in the public health agenda of Brazil.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521242
[Au] Autor:Nicolau DP; Rodrigueza BA; Girottoa JE
[Ad] Address:Center for Anti-Infective Research and Development. United States.
[Ti] Title:Ceftazidime/avibactam and Ceftolozane/tazobactam: Novel Therapy for Multidrug Resistant Gram Negative Infections in Children.
[So] Source:Curr Pediatr Rev;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1875-6336
[Cp] Country of publication:United Arab Emirates
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) infections has become a significant problem in both the developing countries and in the United States (U.S.). Specifically, MDR gram-negative infections are emerging, affecting not only adults but children as well. The specific gram-negative organisms that have been most concerning within the pediatric population include MDR P. aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae, and Acinetobacter spp. The increase in antimicrobial resistance rates are associated with various mechanisms, with, one of the most common being the production of beta-lactamases. Both ceftazidime/avibactam (CZA) and ceftolozane/tazobactam (C/T) are two recently approved antibiotics in the U.S. While both of these agents are inhibitors of beta-lactamase enzymes, there are differences between them that are important to understand. At this time the data in children for these agents are extremely limited.. The aim of this review is to describe the characteristics of these agents and their potential uses in pediatric patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/1573396314666180308150908

  6 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519734
[Au] Autor:Rineh A; Bremner JB; Hamblin MR; Ball AR; Tegos GP; Kelso MJ
[Ad] Address:School of Chemistry and Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Attaching NorA efflux pump inhibitors to methylene blue enhances antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation of Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii in vitro and in vivo.
[So] Source:Bioorg Med Chem Lett;, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3405
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics is a public health concern worldwide due to the increasing failure of standard antibiotic therapies. Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (aPDI) is a promising non-antibiotic alternative for treating localized bacterial infections that uses non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and kill microbes. Phenothiazinium photosensitizers like methylene blue (MB) and toluidine blue O are hydrophobic cations that are naturally expelled from bacterial cells by multidrug efflux pumps, which reduces their effectiveness. We recently reported the discovery of a NorA efflux pump inhibitor-methylene blue (EPI-MB) hybrid compound INF55-(Ac)en-MB that shows enhanced photodynamic inactivation of the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) relative to MB, both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the surprising observation that INF55-(Ac)en-MB and two related hybrids bearing the NorA efflux pump inhibitors INF55 and INF271 also show enhanced aPDI activity in vitro (relative to MB) against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii, despite neither species expressing the NorA pump. Two of the hybrids showed superior effects to MB in murine aPDI infection models. The findings motivate wider exploration of aPDI with EPI-MB hybrids against Gram-negative pathogens and more detailed studies into the molecular mechanisms underpinning their activity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29411661
[Au] Autor:Kidd JM; Kuti JL; Nicolau DP
[Ad] Address:a Center for Anti-Infective Research and Development , Hartford Hospital , Hartford , CT , USA.
[Ti] Title:Novel pharmacotherapy for the treatment of hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by resistant gram-negative bacteria.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Pharmacother;19(4):397-408, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7666
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) are among the most prevalent infections in hospitalized patients, particularly those in the intensive care unit. Importantly, the frequency of multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative (GN) bacteria as the bacteriologic cause of HABP/VABP is increasing. These include MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Few antibiotics are currently available when such MDR Gram-negatives are encountered and older agents such as polymyxin B, colistin (polymyxin E), and tigecycline have typically performed poorly in HABP/VABP. Areas covered: In this review, the authors summarize novel antibiotics which have reached phase 3 clinical trials including patients with HABP/VABP. For each agent, the spectrum of activity, pertinent pharmacological characteristics, clinical trial data, and potential utility in the treatment of MDR-GN HABP/VABP is discussed. Expert opinion: Novel antibiotics currently available, and those soon to be, will expand opportunities to treat HABP/VABP caused by MDR-GN organisms and minimize the use of more toxic, less effective drugs. However, with sparse clinical data available, defining the appropriate role for each of the new agents is challenging. In order to maximize the utility of these antibiotics, combination therapy and the role of therapeutic drug monitoring should be investigated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/14656566.2018.1438408

  8 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29260856
[Au] Autor:Iyer R; Moussa SH; Durand-Réville TF; Tommasi R; Miller A
[Ad] Address:Entasis Therapeutics , 35 Gatehouse Drive , Waltham , Massachusetts 02451 , United States.
[Ti] Title:Acinetobacter baumannii OmpA Is a Selective Antibiotic Permeant Porin.
[So] Source:ACS Infect Dis;4(3):373-381, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:2373-8227
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OmpA is a conserved, abundantly expressed outer membrane porin in Acinetobacter baumannii whose presumed role in antibiotic permeation has not been clearly demonstrated. In this report, we use a titratable heterologous expression system to express OmpA in isolation and demonstrate selective passage of small molecule antibiotics through OmpA . ETX2514, a recently discovered broad-spectrum ß-lactamase inhibitor, in combination with sulbactam, is currently in clinical testing for the treatment of drug-resistant A. baumannii infections. We demonstrate that ETX2514 permeates OmpA and potentiates the activity of sulbactam in an OmpA -dependent manner. In addition, we show that small modifications in the structure of ETX2514 differentially affect its passage through OmpA , revealing unique structure-porin-permeation relationships. Finally, we confirm the contribution of OmpA to bacterial fitness using a murine thigh model of A. baumannii infection. These results, combined with the high sequence homology of OmpA across Acinetobacter spp., suggest that optimization of antibiotic entry through OmpA may prove to be a feasible medicinal chemistry design strategy for future antibacterial discovery efforts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1021/acsinfecdis.7b00168

  9 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29215335
[Au] Autor:Djordjevic ZM; Folic MM; Jankovic SM
[Ad] Address:Clinic of Control Hospital Infections, Kragujevac Centre Clinical, Kragujevac, Serbia.
[Ti] Title:Previous Antibiotic Exposure and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of spp. and aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Nosocomial Infections.
[So] Source:Balkan Med J;34(6):527-533, 2017 12 01.
[Is] ISSN:2146-3131
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The alarming spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing healthcare-associated infections has been extensively reported in recent medical literature. AIMS: To compare trends in antimicrobial consumption and development of resistance among isolates of spp. and that cause hospital infections. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: A study was conducted in a tertiary healthcare institution in central Serbia, during the 7-year period between January 2009 and December 2015. The incidence rate of infections caused by or , as well as their resistance density to commonly used antibiotics, were calculated. Utilization of antibiotics was expressed as the number of defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days. RESULTS: A statistically significant increase in resistance density in 2015 compared to the first year of observation was noted for , but not for , to third-generation cephalosporins (p=0.008), aminoglycosides (p=0.005), carbapenems (p=0.003), piperacillin/tazobactam (p=0.025), ampicillin/sulbactam (p=0.009) and tigecycline (p=0.048). CONCLUSION: Our study showed that there is an association between the resistance density of spp. and utilization of carbapenems, tigecycline and aminoglycosides. A multifaceted intervention is needed to decrease the incidence rate of and hospital infections, as well as their resistance density to available antibiotics.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology
Acinetobacter/drug effects
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Cross Infection/drug therapy
Cross Infection/microbiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial/drug effects
Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acinetobacter/isolation & purification
Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data
Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification
Serbia/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4274/balkanmedj.2016.1844

  10 / 7547 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515090
[Au] Autor:Zhao F; Lan XQ; Du Y; Chen PY; Zhao J; Zhao F; Lee WH; Zhang Y
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Subtropical Medicinal Edible Resources Development and Utilization in Yunnan Province, Department of Biology and Chemistry, Puer University, Puer Yunnan 665000, China.
[Ti] Title:King cobra peptide OH-CATH30 as a potential candidate drug through clinic drug-resistant isolates.
[So] Source:Zool Res;39(2):87-96, 2018 Mar 18.
[Is] ISSN:2095-8137
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are considered as important candidate therapeutic agents, which exert potent microbicidal properties against bacteria, fungi and some viruses. Based on our previous findings king cobra cathelicidin (OH-CATH) is a 34-amino acid peptide that exerts strong antibacterial and weak hemolytic activity. The aim of this research is to evaluate the efficacy of both OH-CATH30 and its analog D-OH-CATH30 against clinical isolates comparing with routinely utilized antibiotics in vitro. In this study, 584 clinical isolates were tested (spanning 2013-2016) and the efficacy of the candidate peptides and antibiotics were determined by a broth microdilution method according to the CLSI guidelines. Among the 584 clinical isolates, 85% were susceptible to OH-CATH30 and its analogs. Both L- and D-OH-CATH30 showed higher efficacy against (toward) Gram-positive bacteria and stronger antibacterial activity against nearly all Gram-negative bacteria tested compare with antibiotics. The highest bactericidal activity was detected against Acinetobacter spp., including multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The overall efficacy of OH-CATH30 and its analogs was higher than that of the 9 routinely used antibiotics. OH-CATH30 is a promising candidate drug for the treatment of a wide variety of bacterial infections which are resistant to many routinely used antimicrobial agents.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.24272/j.issn.2095-8137.2018.025


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