Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Acute and Radiation and Syndrome [Words]
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[PMID]: 29519544
[Au] Autor:Di Serafino L; Turturo M; Lanzone S; Marano M; Scognamiglio G; Trimarco B; Cirillo P; Esposito G; D'Agostino C
[Ad] Address:Division of Cardiology, Di Venere Hospital, Bari, Italy; Division of Cardiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. Electronic address: luigi.diserafino@unina.it.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of the Effect of Dual-Axis Rotational Coronary Angiography Versus Conventional Coronary Angiography on Frequency of Acute Kidney Injury, X-Ray Exposure Time, and Quantity of Contrast Medium Injected.
[So] Source:Am J Cardiol;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1913
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dual-axis rotational coronary angiography (DARCA) has already been shown to reduce both the amount of contrast medium and radiation exposure compared with conventional coronary angiography (CCA). However, a clinical benefit of such imaging modality has never been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of DARCA to prevent acute kidney injury (AKI) compared with CCA. Consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography were enrolled to DARCA (n = 80) or CCA (n = 80). Patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction or previously underwent coronary artery bypass graft were excluded. The 2 groups were homogeneous in terms of both clinical and procedural characteristics. Total x-ray time and total amount of contrast medium were significantly lower in the DARCA group compared with the CCA group (x-ray time 3.2 minutes [1.8 to 7.0] vs 5.1 minutes [2.6 to 9.9], p = 0.002; contrast medium amount 40 ml [31 to 116] vs 80 ml [50 to 150], p <0.001). AKI more often occurred in the CCA group compared with the DARCA group (16 [20%] vs 4 [5%], p = 0.007). Moreover, in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), AKI more often occurred in the CCA group compared with the DARCA group (ACS patients, 6 [29%] vs 2 [6%], p = 0.04, and PCI patients, 11 [33%] vs 0 [0%], p <0.001). In addition, in patients with high pretest probability of coronary artery disease, AKI more often occurred in the CCA group compared with the DARCA group (11 [55%] vs 2 [6%], p <0.001). In conclusion, DARCA significantly reduces both x-ray exposure and amount of contrast medium usage, thereby reducing the occurrence of AKI compared with CCA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29509947
[Au] Autor:Dainiak N
[Ad] Address:Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), 1299 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.
[Ti] Title:Medical management of acute radiation syndrome and associated infections in a high-casualty incident.
[So] Source:J Radiat Res;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1349-9157
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A high-casualty incident may result in a significant human toll due to the inability of a community to meet the health care demands of the population. A successful medical response requires health care facilities to not only communicate and integrate medical services, meet surge capacity, protect health care workers and implement triage and treatment protocols, but also to provide the venue for clinical management of acute radiation injuries and their associated infections. Today, clinical management is primarily guided by the recommendations of a Consultancy that were made at the World Health Organization (WHO). This international consensus was reached on evidence-based, clinical management of each of the four sub-syndromes that compose acute radiation syndrome (ARS), including the hematopoietic subsyndrome (HS), gastrointestinal subsyndrome (GIS), neurovascular subsyndrome (NVS) and cutaneous subsyndrome (CS). Major findings in studies meeting inclusion criteria for management strategies for HS were that (i) no randomized controlled studies of medical countermeasures have been (or will likely ever be) performed for ARS cases, (ii) the data for management of HS are restricted by the lack of comparator groups, and (iii) reports of countermeasures for management of injury to non-hematopoietic organs are often incompletely described. Here, (i) recommendations made in Geneva are summarized; (ii) the analysis of countermeasures for HS is updated by review of two additional cases and extended to published reports not meeting inclusion criteria; and (iii) guidelines are provided for management of microbial infections based upon patient risk for prolonged immunosuppression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jrr/rry004

  3 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29445080
[Au] Autor:Jalili-Firoozinezhad S; Prantil-Baun R; Jiang A; Potla R; Mammoto T; Weaver JC; Ferrante TC; Kim HJ; Cabral JMS; Levy O; Ingber DE
[Ad] Address:Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
[Ti] Title:Modeling radiation injury-induced cell death and countermeasure drug responses in a human Gut-on-a-Chip.
[So] Source:Cell Death Dis;9(2):223, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:2041-4889
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Studies on human intestinal injury induced by acute exposure to γ-radiation commonly rely on use of animal models because culture systems do not faithfully mimic human intestinal physiology. Here we used a human Gut-on-a-Chip (Gut Chip) microfluidic device lined by human intestinal epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells to model radiation injury and assess the efficacy of radiation countermeasure drugs in vitro. Exposure of the Gut Chip to γ-radiation resulted in increased generation of reactive oxygen species, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and DNA fragmentation, as well as villus blunting, disruption of tight junctions, and compromise of intestinal barrier integrity. In contrast, pre-treatment with a potential prophylactic radiation countermeasure drug, dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), significantly suppressed all of these injury responses. Thus, the human Gut Chip may serve as an in vitro platform for studying radiation-induced cell death and associate gastrointestinal acute syndrome, in addition to screening of novel radio-protective medical countermeasure drugs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41419-018-0304-8

  4 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29502528
[Au] Autor:Ude CC; Miskon A; Idrus RBH; Abu Bakar MB
[Ad] Address:Bio-artifical Organ and Regenerative Medicine Unit, National Defence University of Malaysia, Sungai Besi Camp, 57000, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Application of stem cells in tissue engineering for defense medicine.
[So] Source:Mil Med Res;5(1):7, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:2054-9369
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The dynamic nature of modern warfare, including threats and injuries faced by soldiers, necessitates the development of countermeasures that address a wide variety of injuries. Tissue engineering has emerged as a field with the potential to provide contemporary solutions. In this review, discussions focus on the applications of stem cells in tissue engineering to address health risks frequently faced by combatants at war. Human development depends intimately on stem cells, the mysterious precursor to every kind of cell in the body that, with proper instruction, can grow and differentiate into any new tissue or organ. Recent reports have suggested the greater therapeutic effects of the anti-inflammatory, trophic, paracrine and immune-modulatory functions associated with these cells, which induce them to restore normal healing and tissue regeneration by modulating immune reactions, regulating inflammation, and suppressing fibrosis. Therefore, the use of stem cells holds significant promise for the treatment of many battlefield injuries and their complications. These applications include the treatment of injuries to the skin, sensory organs, nervous system tissues, the musculoskeletal system, circulatory/pulmonary tissues and genitals/testicles and of acute radiation syndrome and the development of novel biosensors. The new research developments in these areas suggest that solutions are being developed to reduce critical consequences of wounds and exposures suffered in warfare. Current military applications of stem cell-based therapies are already saving the lives of soldiers who would have died in previous conflicts. Injuries that would have resulted in deaths previously now result in wounds today; similarly, today's permanent wounds may be reduced to tomorrow's bad memories with further advances in stem cell-based therapies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s40779-018-0154-9

  5 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501068
[Au] Autor:Dant JT; Reeves G; Stricklin D
[Ad] Address:1Arlington Division,Applied Research Associates Inc,Arlington,Virginia.
[Ti] Title:Automated Translation of Clinical Parameters in Evaluating Acute Radiation Injury: Results From a Mass Casualty Exercise.
[So] Source:Disaster Med Public Health Prep;:1-5, 2018 Mar 04.
[Is] ISSN:1938-744X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: A radiological disaster could result in a large number of patients potentially exposed to harmful levels of radiation. Currently, early triage of patients for radiation exposure relies heavily on a clinical evaluation of signs and symptoms. However, detailed clinical assessment takes significant time and requires specialized training to accurately interpret the results. METHODS: During planning of a recent exercise, SMEs estimated that it would take up to 15 minutes per patient. Patient load would quickly overwhelm the number of qualified clinicians providing treatment. In this exercise organized by the NATO RTG HFM 222, we examined using automated translation of clinical data to facilitate clinic evaluations. We used two triage evaluation approaches; REAC/TS and METREPOL. These approaches allowed us to translate tabulated clinical data, first into categorical data for grouping patients, and then into recommendations for follow-up diagnostics and care. RESULTS: The organizers provided clinical evaluations of 191 case studies that were estimated to require up to 50 total hours for completion. However, using our application, we were able to evaluate all cases in less than 2 minutes. CONCLUSION: This study clearly demonstrates the need for automated tools to help translate clinical data for effective patient triage after a nuclear or radiological incident. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;page 1 of 5).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1017/dmp.2017.126

  6 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29197678
[Au] Autor:Ketterl TG; Chow EJ; Leisenring WM; Goodman P; Koves IH; Petryk A; Steinberger J; Baker KS
[Ad] Address:Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Electronic address: tketterl@fredhutch.org.
[Ti] Title:Adipokines, Inflammation, and Adiposity in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors.
[So] Source:Biol Blood Marrow Transplant;24(3):622-626, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1523-6536
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Adult survivors of acute leukemia in childhood have a higher-than-expected frequency of obesity and are at increased risk for metabolic syndrome and early mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adipose tissue has been recognized as an endocrine and paracrine organ that secretes various adipokines involved in metabolic regulation and inflammatory processes. In this study, we examined inflammatory factors (IL-6 and TNF-α) and adipokines (adiponectin, leptin), in addition to body composition and adiposity, in cancer survivors who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) during childhood compared with sibling controls. Over 2-year survivors of HCT for hematologic malignancies during childhood were recruited from 2 institutions along with a control population of siblings. Participants underwent evaluation for body composition, anthropometric measurements, and assessment of CVD risk factors and adipokines. Cases were stratified by radiation exposure in the preparative regimen (total body irradiation [TBI] + central nervous system [CNS] irradiation, TBI only, chemotherapy only) and adjusted least squares means were estimated for each adipokine and adjusted by age, sex, race, Tanner stage, and percent fat mass (PFM) percentiles (0-24, 25-74, 75+). A total of 151 HCT survivors and 92 siblings underwent evaluation. Significant differences in mean adipokine levels were detected between survivors and siblings; leptin was significantly higher and adiponectin significantly lower in HCT survivors who received TBI with or without CNS irradiation compared with siblings. IL-6 was significantly higher in all groups of HCT survivors compared with siblings. Body mass index (BMI) was similar in survivors and controls, although PFM was significantly higher in all groups of HCT survivors and lean body mass (LBM) was lower in survivors who received TBI with or without CNS radiation compared with siblings. HCT survivors showed an unfavorable profile of inflammation, adipokines, and adiposity, despite similar BMI as controls. Higher PFM and lower LBM may contribute to these findings. TBI exposure is correlated with greater severity of these observations. Increasing LBM may represent a tangible target for mitigating the high cardiometabolic risks of HCT survivors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29494324
[Au] Autor:Port M; Pieper B; Dörr HD; Hübsch A; Majewski M; Abend M
[Ad] Address:Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Correlation of Radiation Dose Estimates by DIC with the METREPOL Hematological Classes of Disease Severity.
[So] Source:Radiat Res;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-5404
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The degree of severity of hematologic acute radiation syndrome (HARS) may vary across the range of radiation doses, such that dose alone may be a less reliable predictor of clinical course. We sought to elucidate the relationship between absorbed dose and risk of clinically relevant HARS in humans. We used the database SEARCH (System for Evaluation and Archiving of Radiation Accidents based on Case Histories), which contains the histories of radiation accident victims. From 153 cases we extracted data on dose estimates using the dicentric assay to measure individual biological dosimetry. The data were analyzed according to the corresponding hematological response categories of clinical significance (H1-4). These categories are derived from the medical treatment protocols for radiation accident victims (METREPOL) and represent the clinical outcome of HARS based on severity categories ranging from 1-4. In addition, the category H0 represents a post-exposure hematological response that is within the normal range for nonexposed individuals. Age at exposure, gender and ethnicity were considered as potential confounders in unconditional cumulative logistic regression analysis. In most cases, victims were Caucasian (82.4%) and male (92.8%), who originated from either the Chernobyl (69.3%) or Goiânia (10.5%) accident, and nearly 60% were aged 20-40 years at time of exposure. All individuals were whole-body exposed (mean 3.8 Gy, stdev ±3.1), and single exposures were predominantly reported (79%). Seventy percent of victims in category H0 were exposed to ≤1 Gy, with rapidly decreasing proportions of H0 seen at doses up to 5 Gy. There were few HARS H4 cases reported at exposed dose of 1-2 Gy, while 82% of H4 cases received doses of >5 Gy. HARS H1-3 cases varied among dose ranges from 1-5 Gy. In summary, single whole-body radiation doses <1 Gy and >5 Gy corresponded in general with H0 and H3-4, respectively, and this was consistent with medical expectations. This underlines the usefulness of dose estimates for HARS prediction. However, whole-body doses between 1-5 Gy poorly corresponded to HARS H1-3. The dose range of 1-5 Gy was of limited value for medical decision-making regarding, e.g., hospitalization for H2-3, but not H1 and treatment decisions that differ between H1-3. Also, there were some H0 cases at high doses and H2-4 cases at low doses, thereby challenging an individual recommendation based solely on dose.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1667/RR14936.1

  8 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29491314
[Au] Autor:Takahashi H; Kimura T; Yuki N; Yoshioka A
[Ad] Address:Departments of Neurology, National Hospital Organization Maizuru Medical Center, Japan.
[Ti] Title:A Case of Stroke-like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy (SMART) Syndrome Followed by Cerebral Infarction.
[So] Source:Intern Med;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 36-year-old man with a history of irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed headache with cortical dysfunction lasting for 4 weeks. The clinical features were consistent with stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome. Six months later, he developed cerebral infarction due to occlusions of the left anterior and middle cerebral arteries. This is the first case report describing SMART syndrome followed by severe cerebral infarction. Although an association between the two episodes was not assumed, this case indicates that protective therapies against infarction might need to be considered for patients with SMART syndrome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.9579-17

  9 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28463155
[Au] Autor:Nanda RH; Ganju RG; Schreibmann E; Chen Z; Zhang C; Jegadeesh N; Cassidy R; Deng C; Eaton BR; Esiashvili N
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: rhazari@emory.edu.
[Ti] Title:Correlation of Acute and Late Brainstem Toxicities With Dose-Volume Data for Pediatric Patients With Posterior Fossa Malignancies.
[So] Source:Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys;98(2):360-366, 2017 06 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-355X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Radiation-induced brainstem toxicity after treatment of pediatric posterior fossa malignancies is incompletely understood, especially in the era of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The rates of, and predictive factors for, brainstem toxicity after photon RT for posterior fossa tumors were examined. METHODS AND MATERIALS: After institutional review board approval, 60 pediatric patients treated at our institution for nonmetastatic infratentorial ependymoma and medulloblastoma with IMRT were included in the present analysis. Dosimetric variables, including the mean and maximum dose to the brainstem, the dose to 10% to 90% of the brainstem (in 10% increments), and the volume of the brainstem receiving 40, 45, 50, and 55 Gy were recorded for each patient. Acute (onset within 3 months) and late (>3 months of RT completion) RT-induced brainstem toxicities with clinical and radiographic correlates were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. RESULTS: Patients aged 1.4 to 21.8 years underwent IMRT or volumetric arc therapy postoperatively to the posterior fossa or tumor bed. At a median clinical follow-up period of 2.8 years, 14 patients had developed symptomatic brainstem toxicity (crude incidence 23.3%). No correlation was found between the dosimetric variables examined and brainstem toxicity. Vascular injury or ischemia showed a strong trend toward predicting brainstem toxicity (P=.054). Patients with grade 3 to 5 brainstem toxicity had undergone treatment to significant volumes of the posterior fossa. CONCLUSION: The results of the present series demonstrate a low, but not negligible, risk of brainstem radiation necrosis for pediatric patients with posterior fossa malignancies treated with IMRT. No specific dose-volume correlations were identified; however, modern treatment volumes might help limit the incidence of severe toxicity. Additional work investigating inherent biologic sensitivity might also provide further insight into this clinical problem.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Stem/radiation effects
Cerebellar Neoplasms/radiotherapy
Ependymoma/radiotherapy
Infratentorial Neoplasms/radiotherapy
Medulloblastoma/radiotherapy
Radiation Injuries/pathology
Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Disease
Adolescent
Brain Stem/pathology
Cerebellar Neoplasms/pathology
Cerebellar Neoplasms/surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Ependymoma/pathology
Ependymoma/surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infratentorial Neoplasms/pathology
Infratentorial Neoplasms/surgery
Male
Medulloblastoma/pathology
Medulloblastoma/surgery
Necrosis/etiology
Radiotherapy Dosage
Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated/methods
Time Factors
Tumor Burden
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 8012 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29372565
[Au] Autor:Franco JV; Turk T; Jung JH; Xiao YT; Iakhno S; Garrote V; Vietto V
[Ad] Address:Argentine Cochrane Centre, Instituto Universitario Hospital Italiano, Potosí 4234, Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina, C1199ACL.
[Ti] Title:Non-pharmacological interventions for treating chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD012551, 2018 Jan 26.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a common disorder in which the two main clinical features are pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. There are currently many approaches for its management, using both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. The National Institute of Health - Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score is a validated measure commonly used to measure CP/CPPS symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of non-pharmacological therapies for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). SEARCH METHODS: We performed a comprehensive search using multiple databases, trial registries, grey literature and conference proceedings with no restrictions on the language of publication or publication status. The date of the latest search of all databases was August 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials. Inclusion criteria were men with a diagnosis of CP/CPPS. We included all available non-pharmacological interventions. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently classified studies and abstracted data from the included studies, performed statistical analyses and rated quality of evidence (QoE) according to the GRADE methods. MAIN RESULTS: We included 38 unique studies with 3290 men with CP/CPPS across 23 comparisons.1. Acupuncture: (three studies, 204 participants) based on short-term follow-up, acupuncture reduces prostatitis symptoms in an appreciable number of participants compared with sham procedure (mean difference (MD) in total NIH-CPSI score -5.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) -7.32 to -4.26, high QoE). Acupuncture likely results in little to no difference in adverse events (moderate QoE). It probably also decreases prostatitis symptoms compared with standard medical therapy in an appreciable number of participants (MD -6.05, 95% CI -7.87 to -4.24, two studies, 78 participants, moderate QoE).2. Circumcision: (one study, 713 participants) based on short-term follow-up, early circumcision probably decreases prostatitis symptoms slightly (NIH-CPSI score MD -3.00, 95% CI -3.82 to -2.18, moderate QoE) and may not be associated with a greater incidence of adverse events compared with control (a waiting list to be circumcised, low QoE).3. Electromagnetic chair: (two studies, 57 participants) based on short-term follow-up, we are uncertain of the effects of the use of an electromagnetic chair on prostatitis symptoms. It may be associated with a greater incidence of adverse events compared with sham procedure (low to very low QoE).4. Lifestyle modifications: (one study, 100 participants) based on short-term follow-up, lifestyle modifications may be associated with a greater improvement in prostatitis symptoms in an appreciable number of participants compared with control (risk ratio (RR) for improvement in NIH-CPSI scores 3.90, 95% CI 2.20 to 6.92, very low QoE). We found no information regarding adverse events.5. Physical activity: (one study, 85 participants) based on short-term follow-up, a physical activity programme may cause a small reduction in prostatitis symptoms compared with control (NIH-CPSI score MD -2.50, 95% CI -4.69 to -0.31, low QoE). We found no information regarding adverse events.6. Prostatic massage: (two studies, 115 participants) based on short-term follow-up, we are uncertain whether the prostatic massage reduces or increases prostatitis symptoms compared with control (very low QoE). We found no information regarding adverse events.7. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy: (three studies, 157 participants) based on short-term follow-up, extracorporeal shockwave therapy reduces prostatitis symptoms compared with control (NIH-CPSI score MD -6.18, 95% CI -7.46 to -4.89, high QoE). These results may not be sustained at medium-term follow-up (low QoE). This treatment may not be associated with a greater incidence of adverse events (low QoE).8. Transrectal thermotherapy compared to medical therapy: (two studies, 237 participants) based on short-term follow-up, transrectal thermotherapy alone or in combination with medical therapy may decrease prostatitis symptoms slightly when compared with medical therapy alone (NIH-CPSI score MD -2.50, 95% CI -3.82 to -1.18, low QoE). One included study reported that participants may experience transient adverse events.9. Other interventions: there is uncertainty about the effects of other interventions included in this review. We found no information regarding psychological support or prostatic surgery. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Some of the interventions can decrease prostatitis symptoms in an appreciable number without a greater incidence of adverse events. The QoE was mostly low. Future clinical trials should include a full report of their methods including adequate masking, consistent assessment of all patient-important outcomes including potential treatment-related adverse events and appropriate sample sizes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chronic Pain/therapy
Pelvic Pain/therapy
Prostatitis/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acupuncture Therapy/adverse effects
Acupuncture Therapy/methods
Adult
Chronic Disease
Circumcision, Male/adverse effects
Electromagnetic Radiation
Exercise
Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy/adverse effects
Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy/methods
Humans
Hyperthermia, Induced/adverse effects
Hyperthermia, Induced/methods
Life Style
Male
Massage/methods
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180127
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD012551.pub2


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