Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Adansonia [Words]
References found : 109 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 11 go to page                         

  1 / 109 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29091868
[Au] Autor:Owoyele BV; Bakare AO
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria. Electronic address: deleyele@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Analgesic properties of aqueous bark extract of Adansonia digitata in Wistar rats.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;97:209-212, 2017 Oct 26.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The study investigated the analgesic effect of the aqueous extract of the bark of Adansonia digitata using Wistar rats. Thirty Wistar rats weighing between 150 and 170g of either sex were used for the study. Animal were picked randomly and grouped into six with each group made up of five animals (3 females and 2 males). Oral administration of 10ml/kg of normal saline were given to control group; 5mg/kg of indomethacin to reference group; and 25mg/kg, 50mg/kg, 100mg/kg or 200mg/kg of aqueous extracts of Adansonia digitata to each of the test groups respectively.Hotplate and formalin paw-licking tests were used for nociceptive assessment. Animals treated with aqueous bark extract of Adansonia digitata showed significantly (p<0.05) prolonged response time to thermal stimuli (4.42±0.11s) compared with control group (3.29±0.29s) in a dose dependent manner. Results formalin paw-licking test showed that at early phase, animals administered with aqueous bark extract of Adansonia digitata significantly (p<0.05) have reduced paw-licking time (47.88±3.48-40.80±3.85s) compared with the control group (91.51±7.32s). In the late phase, aqueous bark extract of Adansoni adigitata significantly (p<0.05) reduced the paw-licking time (43.57±2.6-25.49±3.46s) compared with the control group (66.31±5.04s). It is hereby concluded that aqueous bark extract of A. digitata possesses a strong analgesic effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29084687
[Au] Autor:Mumtaz T; Rizwani GH; Shareef H
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Analgesic activities of crude ethanolic extract and various fractions of Adansonia digitata L. grown at the sindh province of Pakistan.
[So] Source:Pak J Pharm Sci;30(5):1657-1663, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1011-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The current study aimed to evaluate the analgesic effects of crude extract and fractions of leaves of Adansonia digitata L. (Malvaceae). Fresh leaves were collected, dried under shade and then powdered. Moreover, powder was usedto extract with Ethanol and concentrated under reduced pressure, followed by partitioning with organic solvents i.e. Hexane, Ethylacetate, Butanol and Aqueous. These fractions were analyzed for analgesic effect at dose of 50, 100, 200; mg/kg body weight by acetic acid induced writhing, tail flick and hot plate analgesic models. No acute oral toxicity was observed and extracts considered being saved at a dose of 50-3000 mg/kg body weight. Orally administered extract of A. digitata showed analgesic activity described by decrease in writhes counts which was contrast to control. Significant (P<0.05-0.001) increased in latency period in hot plate analgesic test when compared Diclofenac sodium (50 mg/kg) which is used as a standard drug. Furthermore, in tail flick test a dose of (50, 100, 200mg/kg body weight) of extracts exhibited significant (P<0.05-0.001) analgesia which is dose dependent when compared to control group. These findings of analgesic testing have revealed that leaves extract of this nutritional plants possess remarkable antinociceptive effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28880962
[Au] Autor:Gaisberger H; Kindt R; Loo J; Schmidt M; Bognounou F; Da SS; Diallo OB; Ganaba S; Gnoumou A; Lompo D; Lykke AM; Mbayngone E; Nacoulma BMI; Ouedraogo M; Ouédraogo O; Parkouda C; Porembski S; Savadogo P; Thiombiano A; Zerbo G; Vinceti B
[Ad] Address:Bioversity International, Via dei Tre Denari 472/a, Maccarese (Rome), Italy.
[Ti] Title:Spatially explicit multi-threat assessment of food tree species in Burkina Faso: A fine-scale approach.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0184457, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Over the last decades agroforestry parklands in Burkina Faso have come under increasing demographic as well as climatic pressures, which are threatening indigenous tree species that contribute substantially to income generation and nutrition in rural households. Analyzing the threats as well as the species vulnerability to them is fundamental for priority setting in conservation planning. Guided by literature and local experts we selected 16 important food tree species (Acacia macrostachya, Acacia senegal, Adansonia digitata, Annona senegalensis, Balanites aegyptiaca, Bombax costatum, Boscia senegalensis, Detarium microcarpum, Lannea microcarpa, Parkia biglobosa, Sclerocarya birrea, Strychnos spinosa, Tamarindus indica, Vitellaria paradoxa, Ximenia americana, Ziziphus mauritiana) and six key threats to them (overexploitation, overgrazing, fire, cotton production, mining and climate change). We developed a species-specific and spatially explicit approach combining freely accessible datasets, species distribution models (SDMs), climate models and expert survey results to predict, at fine scale, where these threats are likely to have the greatest impact. We find that all species face serious threats throughout much of their distribution in Burkina Faso and that climate change is predicted to be the most prevalent threat in the long term, whereas overexploitation and cotton production are the most important short-term threats. Tree populations growing in areas designated as 'highly threatened' due to climate change should be used as seed sources for ex situ conservation and planting in areas where future climate is predicting suitable habitats. Assisted regeneration is suggested for populations in areas where suitable habitat under future climate conditions coincides with high threat levels due to short-term threats. In the case of Vitellaria paradoxa, we suggest collecting seed along the northern margins of its distribution and considering assisted regeneration in the central part where the current threat level is high due to overexploitation. In the same way, population-specific recommendations can be derived from the individual and combined threat maps of the other 15 food tree species. The approach can be easily transferred to other countries and can be used to analyze general and species specific threats at finer and more local as well as at broader (continental) scales in order to plan more selective and efficient conservation actions in time. The concept can be applied anywhere as long as appropriate spatial data are available as well as knowledgeable experts.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Conservation of Natural Resources/methods
Food
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acacia
Adansonia
Anacardiaceae
Annona
Balanites
Bombax
Burkina Faso
Climate Change
Ecosystem
Olacaceae
Tamarindus
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171016
[Lr] Last revision date:171016
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170908
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184457

  4 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28880083
[Au] Autor:Kouteu PAN; Blin J; Baréa B; Barouh N; Villeneuve P
[Ad] Address:Institut International d'Ingénierie de l'Eau et de l'Environnement (2iE), Laboratoire Biomasse Énergie et Biocarburants (LBEB) , Rue de la Science, 01 BP 594, Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso.
[Ti] Title:Solvent-Free Biodiesel Production Catalyzed by Crude Lipase Powder from Seeds: Effects of Alcohol Polarity, Glycerol, and Thermodynamic Water Activity.
[So] Source:J Agric Food Chem;65(39):8683-8690, 2017 Oct 04.
[Is] ISSN:1520-5118
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of crude lipase powders made from Adansonia grandidieri and Jatropha mahafalensis seeds for the synthesis of fatty acid alkyl esters in a solvent-free system. The influence of the nature of the alcohol, the amount of glycerol, and hydration of the powder was investigated. Results showed that the activity of these crude lipase powders was inversely proportional to the alcohol polarity and the amount of the glycerol in the reaction medium. To ensure optimum activity, A. grandidieri and J. mahafalensis powders must be conditioned to a water activity of 0.33 and 0.66. To obtain a fatty acid ethyl ester yield greater than 95% with A. grandidieri, ethanol should be introduced at an amount corresponding to a triacylglycerol to ethanol molar ratio of 2:1 every 15 h for 96 h and use 25% of preconditioned crude lipase powders (2 additions of 12.5%).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171004
[Lr] Last revision date:171004
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.jafc.7b03094

  5 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28784541
[Au] Autor:Li XN; Sun J; Shi H; Yu LL; Ridge CD; Mazzola EP; Okunji C; Iwu MM; Michel TK; Chen P
[Ad] Address:Food Composition and Methods Development Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA; College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Profiling hydroxycinnamic acid glycosides, iridoid glycosides, and phenylethanoid glycosides in baobab fruit pulp (Adansonia digitata).
[So] Source:Food Res Int;99(Pt 1):755-761, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7145
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) is a magnificent tree revered throughout Africa and is becoming recognized for its high nutritional and medicinal values. Despite numerous reports on the pharmacological potential, little is known about its chemical compositions. In this study, four hydroxycinnamic acid glycosides (1-4), six iridoid glycosides (5-10), and three phenylethanoid glycosides (11-13) were isolated from the dried baobab fruit pulp. Their structures were determined by means of spectroscopic analyses, including HRMS, H and C NMR and 2D experiments (COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and ROESY). All 13 compounds isolated were reported for the first time in the genus of Adansonia. An ultra high-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution accurate-mass mass spectrometry (UHPLC HRAM MS) method was used to conduct further investigation of the chemical compositions of the hydro-alcohol baobab fruit pulp extract. Hydroxycinnamic acid glycosides, iridoid glycosides and phenylethanoid glycosides were found to be the main components in baobab fruit pulp.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170815
[Lr] Last revision date:170815
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28731216
[Au] Autor:Chadare FJ; Madode YE; Fanou-Fogny N; Kindossi JM; Ayosso JO; Honfo SH; Kayodé AP; Linnemann AR; Hounhouigan DJ
[Ad] Address:Laboratoire de Sciences des Aliments, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d'Abomey-Calavi (LSA/FSA/UAC), Abomey-Calavi, Benin.
[Ti] Title:Indigenous food ingredients for complementary food formulations to combat infant malnutrition in Benin: a review.
[So] Source:J Sci Food Agric;, 2017 Jul 21.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0010
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper reviews indigenous Beninese food resources as potential ingredients for complementary infant foods with the aim to develop affordable formulations for low-income households in each agro-ecological zone of the country. Potential ingredients were selected on their documented nutritional value. The selected foods encompass 347 food resources, namely 297 plant products from home gardens or collected from natural vegetation and 50 animals, either domesticated or from the wild. The compiled data reveal that the distribution of the available food resources was unbalanced between agro-ecological zones. Only a few animal ingredients are obtainable in northern Benin. Most resources are seasonal, but their availability may be extended. A high variation was observed in energy and nutrient contents. Antinutritional factors were identified in some resources, but processing techniques were reported to reduce their presence in meals. In general, ingredients from local tree foods (Adansonia digitata, Parkia biglobosa) were adequate as sources of nutrients for complementary infant foods. Based on this review, local foods for the development of complementary food formulas for Beninese infants and children may be selected for each agro-ecological zone. The approach used is exemplary for other sub-Saharan African countries in need of complementary infant foods. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170912
[Lr] Last revision date:170912
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/jsfa.8568

  7 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28413912
[Au] Autor:Garvey R; Clegg M; Coe S
[Ad] Address:Functional Food Centre, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
[Ti] Title:The acute effects of baobab fruit ( Adansonia digitata) on satiety in healthy adults.
[So] Source:Nutr Health;23(2):83-86, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0260-1060
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The baobab fruit is high in both dietary fibre and polyphenols and therefore may increase satiety. The aim of the study was to measure the effects of baobab fruit extract on satiety. METHODS: The study was conducted on 20 healthy participants. The study was a one-day single-blind crossover design. Participants were randomised to either a test smoothie consisting of 15 g of baobab extract or a control smoothie without the addition of baobab. Subjective ratings of satiety were taken on visual analogue scales immediately pre-consumption and then post-consumption, and energy intake at a post ad libitum meal was recorded. RESULTS: Subjective measures of hunger were reduced following the test smoothie compared with the control ( p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in calorie intake at an ad libitum meal. CONCLUSIONS: This research has positive implications for the use of baobab for reducing hunger, possibly having a positive effect on weight maintenance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170623
[Lr] Last revision date:170623
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1177/0260106017704361

  8 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28369733
[Au] Autor:Lindshield S; Danielson BJ; Rothman JM; Pruetz JD
[Ad] Address:Department of World Languages and Cultures, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.
[Ti] Title:Feeding in fear? How adult male western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) adjust to predation and savanna habitat pressures.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;163(3):480-496, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: We evaluated risk-sensitive foraging in adult male western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) occupying a savanna environment at Fongoli, Senegal. The aim of this study was to determine how the risks of predation and heat stress influenced their behavior while feeding on a key food, fruit of the baobab tree (Adansonia digitata). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Proximity of fruiting baobab trees to anthropogenic landmarks were compared to food intake, feeding rate, and behavioral indicators of fear in adult males (N = 11) at Fongoli. Additionally, we compared foraging to vegetative habitats, baobab ripe fruit nutritive quality, surface water availability, and foraging party composition. RESULTS: Fruit abundance increased with proximity to anthropogenic landmarks, and chimpanzees exhibited higher frequencies of antipredator behaviors as they approached these risky areas. However, predation risk did not deter adult males from visiting these fruiting trees; instead, risky foraging bouts were associated with higher food intakes and longer feeding times. Additionally, higher feeding rates were observed in open-canopy habitats, and this behavior may have minimized their risk of heat stress. CONCLUSIONS: Adaptations that minimize predation risk are widespread in mammalian prey species, but these traits are poorly understood in chimpanzees. Great apes encounter few nonhuman predators capable of successfully capturing and killing them; thus, such events are rarely observed. Although people rarely hunt chimpanzees in Senegal, we found that adult males perceived humans as predators and adjusted their behavior while foraging in risky habitats. From an applied perspective, risk-taking behavior is important for understanding and mitigating the problem of crop-feeding in locations where chimpanzees and humans live in sympatry.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ecosystem
Feeding Behavior/physiology
Pan troglodytes/physiology
Predatory Behavior/physiology
Stress, Physiological/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Anthropology, Physical
Fear
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170821
[Lr] Last revision date:170821
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170404
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23221

  9 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28317543
[Au] Autor:Cruywagen EM; Slippers B; Roux J; Wingfield MJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Tree Health Biotechnology (CTHB), Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0083, South Africa. Electronic address: elsie.cruwyagen@fa
[Ti] Title:Phylogenetic species recognition and hybridisation in Lasiodiplodia: A case study on species from baobabs.
[So] Source:Fungal Biol;121(4):420-436, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-6146
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lasiodiplodia species (Botryosphaeriaceae, Ascomycota) infect a wide range of typically woody plants on which they are associated with many different disease symptoms. In this study, we determined the identity of Lasiodiplodia isolates obtained from baobab (Adansonia species) trees in Africa and reviewed the molecular markers used to describe Lasiodiplodia species. Publicly available and newly produced sequence data for some of the type strains of Lasiodiplodia species showed incongruence amongst phylogenies of five nuclear loci. We conclude that several of the previously described Lasiodiplodia species are hybrids of other species. Isolates from baobab trees in Africa included nine species of Lasiodiplodia and two hybrid species. Inoculation trials with the most common Lasiodiplodia species collected from these trees produced significant lesions on young baobab trees. There was also variation in aggressiveness amongst isolates from the same species. The apparently widespread tendency of Lasiodiplodia species to hybridise demands that phylogenies from multiple loci (more than two and preferably four or more) are compared for congruence prior to new species being described. This will avoid hybrids being incorrectly described as new taxa, as has clearly occurred in the past.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adansonia/microbiology
Ascomycota/classification
Ascomycota/isolation & purification
DNA, Fungal/genetics
Phylogeny
Recombination, Genetic
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Africa
Ascomycota/genetics
Plant Diseases/microbiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Fungal)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170926
[Lr] Last revision date:170926
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170321
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 109 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Athayde, Margareth L
Full text

[PMID]: 28265358
[Au] Autor:Irondi EA; Akintunde JK; Agboola SO; Boligon AA; Athayde ML
[Ad] Address:Biochemistry Unit Department of Biosciences and Biotechnology Kwara State University Malete, P.M.B. 1530 Ilorin Nigeria.
[Ti] Title:Blanching influences the phenolics composition, antioxidant activity, and inhibitory effect of leaves extract on -amylase, -glucosidase, and aldose reductase.
[So] Source:Food Sci Nutr;5(2):233-242, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2048-7177
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:( . ) leaves serve as food and has several medicinal uses in many parts of the world. This study evaluated the influence of blanching on the phenolics composition, antioxidant activity, and inhibitory effect of methanol extract of . leaves on the activities of some key enzymes ( -amylase, -glucosidase, and aldose reductase) implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in vitro. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis revealed that the leaves had appreciable levels of flavonoids and phenolic acids, including catechin, epicatechin, rutin, quercitrin, quercetin, kaempferol, and luteolin (flavonoids); gallic, chlorogenic, caffeic, and ellagic acids (phenolic acids). Blanching caused significant ( < 0.05) decrease in the flavonoids and phenolic acids contents; DPPH* (2,2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical) and ABTS* [2,2-azinobis (3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation] scavenging ability; reducing power; and Fe -induced lipid peroxidation inhibitory capacity of the extract. Similarly, the inhibitory effect of the extract on the activities of -amylase, -glucosidase, and aldose reductase was significantly ( < 0.05) reduced due to blanching. Thus, . leaves extract could be effective for the management of T2D due to its flavonoids and phenolic acids content, antioxidant properties, and inhibitory potency on the activities of -amylase, -glucosidase, and aldose reductase. However, blanching militated against the levels of these functional attributes of the leaves and, therefore, may not be recommended for their optimal retention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/fsn3.386


page 1 of 11 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information