Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Adrenal and Insufficiency [Words]
References found : 12404 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1241 go to page                         

  1 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29508432
[Au] Autor:Philpott H; Dougherty MK; Reed CC; Caldwell M; Kirk D; Torpy DJ; Dellon ES
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Lyell McEwin and Modbury Hospitals, Northern Adelaide Local Health Network (NALHN), University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Systematic review: adrenal insufficiency secondary to swallowed topical corticosteroids in eosinophilic oesophagitis.
[So] Source:Aliment Pharmacol Ther;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2036
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Swallowed topical corticosteroids are prescribed for eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but there is a theoretical risk of adrenal insufficiency from their use. AIMS: To determine if the use of topical corticosteroids to treat EoE is associated with the development of adrenal insufficiency. METHOD: We conducted a systematic review of the published literature from January 1, 1950 to April 1, 2017 using Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and Cochrane Central. Studies and meeting abstracts were included that described patients with EoE who received swallowed topical corticosteroids and any investigation for adrenal insufficiency. RESULTS: The search revealed 1610 unique publications, and 17 met inclusion criteria. There were 7 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), 6 prospective observational studies, 3 retrospective observational studies, and 1 case report. Cortisol measurements were performed on 596 individuals with EoE who received topical corticosteroids. Adrenal testing was abnormal, as defined by each study, in 94/596 patients (crude rate of 15.8%). Only 2 studies were considered to have a low risk of bias, being randomised controlled trials that estimated adrenal insufficiency in the active treatment and placebo groups, before and after treatment. None of the seven randomised controlled trials demonstrated statistically significantly different rates of adrenal insufficiency between topical corticosteroid and placebo over treatment intervals of 2-12 weeks. CONCLUSION: Topical corticosteroids were associated with adrenal insufficiency in a minority of patients. Most cases came from uncontrolled observational studies, with widely varying definitions of adrenal insufficiency. Longer follow-up and larger controlled studies are needed to quantify the risk of adrenal insufficiency with maintenance topical corticosteroid therapy in EoE.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/apt.14573

  2 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29523633
[Au] Autor:Brue T; Amodru V; Castinetti F
[Ad] Address:T Brue, Endocrinology, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Marseille (AP-HM) La Timone and Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France thierry.brue@ap-hm.fr.
[Ti] Title:MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Management of Cushing's syndrome during Pregnancy: solved and unsolved questions.
[So] Source:Eur J Endocrinol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1479-683X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:With fewer than 200 reported cases, Cushing's syndrome (CS) in pregnancy remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. In normal pregnancies, misleading signs may be observed such as striae or hypokalemia, while plasma cortisol and urinary free cortisol may rise up to 2-3-fold. While the dexamethasone suppression test is difficult to use, reference values for salivary cortisol appear valid. The predominant cause is adrenal adenoma (sometimes without decreased ACTH), rather than Cushing's disease. There are considerable imaging pitfalls in Cushing's disease. Aberrant receptors may, in rare cases, lead to increased cortisol production during pregnancy in response to HCG, LHRH, glucagon, vasopressin or after a meal. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rare and has poor prognosis. Active CS during pregnancy is associated with a high rate of maternal complications: hypertension or preeclampsia, diabetes, fractures; more rarely, cardiac failure, psychiatric disorders, infection and maternal death. Increased fetal morbidity includes prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, and less prevalently stillbirth, spontaneous abortion, intrauterine death, and hypoadrenalism. Therapy is also challenging. Milder cases can be managed conservatively by controlling comorbidities. Pituitary or adrenal surgery should ideally be performed during the second trimester and patients should then be treated for adrenal insufficiency. Experience with anticortisolic drugs is limited. Metyrapone was found to allow control of hypercortisolism, with a risk of worsening hypertension. Cabergoline may be an alternative option. The use of other drugs is not advised because of potential teratogenicity and/or lack of information. Non-hormonal (mechanical) contraception is recommended until sustained biological remission is obtained.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29522979
[Au] Autor:Penna-Martinez M; Filmann N; Bogdanou D; Shoghi F; Huenecke S; Schubert R; Herrmann E; Koehl U; Husebye ES; Badenhoop K
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University Hospital, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Electronic address: Marissa.Penna-Martinez@kgu.de.
[Ti] Title:High-dose vitamin D in Addison's disease regulates T-cells and monocytes: A pilot trial.
[So] Source:Nutrition;49:66-73, 2017 Dec 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1244
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: On the basis of the immunomodulatory actions of vitamin D (VD), we investigated the effects of high-dose VD therapy over a 3 mo period on the immune response in patients with Addison's disease (AD). METHODS: This randomized, controlled, crossover trial included 13 patients with AD who received either cholecalciferol (4000 IU/d) for 3 mo followed by 3 mo placebo oil or the sequential alternative placebo followed by verum. Glucocorticoid replacement doses remained stable. The primary outcome measures were changes in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D ) levels and immune cells including T helper cells (Th; CD3 CD4 ), late-activated Th cells (CD3 CD4 HLA-DR ), regulatory T cells (CD3 CD4 CD25 CD127 ), cytotoxic T cells (Tc; CD3 CD8 ), late-activated Tc cells (CD3 CD8 HLA-DR ), and monocytes. The explorative analysis included the correlation of changes with VD-related gene polymorphisms and 21-hydroxylase antibody titers. RESULTS: Ten of 13 patients (77%) were VD deficient. Median 25(OH)D concentrations increased significantly to 41.5 ng/ml (median changes: 19.95 ng/ml; P = 0.0005) after 3 mo of cholecalciferol treatment. Within the T-cells, only the late-activated Th (median changes: 1.6%; P = 0.02) and late-activated Tc cells (median changes: 4.05%; P = 0.03) decreased, whereas monocytes (median changes: 1.05%; P = 0.008) increased after VD therapy. T-cell changes were associated with two polymorphisms (CYP27B1-rs108770012 and VDR-rs10735810), but no changes in the 21-hydroxylase antibody titers were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Three months of treatment with cholecalciferol achieved sufficient 25(OH)D levels and can regulate late-activated T-cells and monocytes in patients with AD. Explorative analysis revealed potential genetic contributions. This pilot trial provides novel insights about immunomodulation in AD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29518865
[Au] Autor:Zhang JP; Guo QH; Mu YM; Lyu ZH; Gu WJ; Yang GQ; Du J; Ba JM; Lu JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China.
[Ti] Title:[Clinical characteristics of central diabetes insipidus: a retrospective analysis of 230 cases].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi;57(3):201-205, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:0578-1426
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To evaluate the clinical characteristics and etiologies of central diabetes insipidus (CDI). The clinical data of 230 patients with CDI in the Department of Endocrinology of Chinese PLA General Hospital from 2008 June to 2014 December were collected and analyzed retrospectively. The three most common causes of CDI were idiopathic CDI, lymphocytic hypophysitis and intracranial germ cell tumors. Among all the CDI, the idiopathic CDI accounted for 37.48%. There were significant differences in age onset and gender distribution among the different causes of CDI. The patients with intracranial germ cell tumors [age of onset(19.2±10.2) years] were younger than the other types of CDI. Germ cell tumors patients were more common in male, and lymphocytic hypophysitis patients were more common in female. The most frequent abnormality of anterior pituitary in patients with CDI was growth hormone deficiency, followed by hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency and hypothyroidism. The dysfunction of thyroid axis and adrenal axis in patients with germ cell tumor was more common than those in patients with idiopathic and lymphocytic hypophysitis. The most common causes of central diabetes insipidus were idiopathic CDI, lymphocytic hypophysitis and intracranial germ cell tumors. There were differences in age of onset, gender distribution and abnormal production of anterior pituitary hormones among all causes of CDI patients.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0578-1426.2018.03.010

  5 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29506479
[Au] Autor:Kim YM; Seo GH; Kim GH; Ko JM; Choi JH; Yoo HW
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-Gu, Seoul, 05505, South Korea.
[Ti] Title:A case of an infant suspected as IMAGE syndrome who were finally diagnosed with MIRAGE syndrome by targeted Mendelian exome sequencing.
[So] Source:BMC Med Genet;19(1):35, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2350
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Adrenal hypoplasia is a rare congenital disorder, which can be classified into a non-syndromic form, without extra-adrenal features, and a syndromic form, with such features. Despite biochemical and molecular genetic evaluation, etiologic diagnosis cannot be performed in many patients with adrenal hypoplasia. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient in this case was a boy born at 31 weeks of gestation with a weight of 882 g (< 3rd percentile) to non-consanguineous parents. Genital examination showed micropenis and bilateral cryptorchidism. On the third day of life, he manifested hypotension with high urine output, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypernatriuria, high plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone level, and high plasma renin activity, suggesting acute adrenal insufficiency. The serum 17α-hydroxyprogesterone level was normal. Adrenal insufficiency improved following administration of hydrocortisone and 9α-fludrocortisone, but the patient died of recurrent infection at 4 months of age. He was suspected as IMAGE (Intrauterine growth restriction, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and Genital anomalies) syndrome. However, no mutation in CDKN1C was identified. Targeted exome sequencing using the TruSight One Sequencing Panel (Illumina) identified a heterozygous mutation of c.2944C > T (p.R982C) in exon 3 in SAMD9. CONCLUSION: This report describes the first Korean case of MIRAGE syndrome. The patient presented with severe primary adrenal insufficiency, intrauterine growth retardation, and recurrent infection. SAMD9 mutation should be considered in patients who present with adrenal hypoplasia and extra-adrenal phenotypes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12881-018-0546-4

  6 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29452421
[Au] Autor:Ueland GÅ; Methlie P; Øksnes M; Thordarson HB; Sagen J; Kellmann R; Mellgren G; Ræder M; Dahlqvist P; Dahl SR; Thorsby PM; Løvås K; Husebye ES
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Science and K.G, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
[Ti] Title:The short cosyntropintest revisited - new normal reference range using LCMSMS.
[So] Source:J Clin Endocrinol Metab;, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The cosyntropin test is used to diagnose adrenal insufficiency (AI) and non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCCAH). Current cutoffs for cortisol and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) are derived from non-standardized immunoassays. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS) offers direct measurement of steroids, prompting the need to re-establish normal ranges. Aim: Define cutoff values for cortisol and 17-OHP in serum by LCMSMS 30 and 60 minutes after intravenous administration of 250 µg tetracosactide acetate (Synachten©) to healthy volunteers, and compare LCMSMS with routine immunoassays. Methods: Cosyntropin testing of healthy subjects (n=138) and patients referred for evaluation of adrenocortical function (n=94). Steroids were assayed by LCMSMS and compared with two immunoassays used in routine diagnostics (Immulite and Roche platforms). Cutoff level for cortisol was defined as the 2.5% percentile in healthy subjects not using oral estrogens (n =121), and for 17-OHP as the 97.5% percentile. Results: Cortisol cutoff levels for LCMSMS were 412 and 485 nmol/L at 30 and 60 minutes, respectively. Applying the new cutoffs, 13/60 (22%) who had AI according to conventional criteria, now had a normal test result. For 17-OHP the cutoff levels were 8.9 and 9.0 nmol/L at 30 and 60 minutes, respectively. Conclusions: Using LCMSMS, cutoff levels for cortisol and 17-OHP after cosyntropin stimulation are lower than those based on immunoassays, possibly since cross-reactivity between steroid intermediates and cortisol is eliminated. This reduces the number of false positive tests for AI and false negative test for NCCAH.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1210/jc.2017-02602

  7 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29444197
[Au] Autor:Odom DC; Gronowski AM; Odom E; Clutter W; Thoelke M
[Ad] Address:Division of Hospital Medicine, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. dodom@wustl.edu.
[Ti] Title:A Single, Post-ACTH Cortisol Measurement to Screen for Adrenal Insufficiency in the Hospitalized Patient.
[So] Source:J Hosp Med;:E1-E5, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1553-5606
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cosyntropin stimulation testing (CST) is used to screen patients for adrenal insufficiency (AI). Traditionally, CST includes baseline cortisol concentration, the administration of cosyntropin, and cortisol concentration at 30 and 60 minutes poststimulation. There is debate surrounding the utility of testing and cut-off points for concentrations at each time point. OBJECTIVE: To determine if a single cortisol measurement at 30 or 60 minutes could replace the traditional approach. DESIGN: looked retrospectively at inpatients who underwent standard, high-dose CST (n = 702) and evaluated the number of patients who would screen positive for AI by using a single time point (30 or 60 minutes) compared with the traditional CST. SETTING: A tertiary-care, academic medical center. PATIENTS: Hospital inpatients present between January 2012 and September 2013. RESULTS: Of tests, 84.3% were normal, which was defined as at least 1 cortisol concentration of 18 mcg/dL or higher at any time after stimulation. The average 60-minute concentration was higher than the average 30-minute concentration (P < .001). A single 60-minute concentration is 100% concordant with the full CST in the intensive care unit (ICU) subgroup and 99.6% concordant in floor patients. A single 30-minute concentration is significantly less concordant, 91.9% and 86.9%, in the ICU and floor subgroups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, a single 60-minute cortisol concentration to screen for AI was 99.7% concordant with the traditional CST, and the positive percent agreement was 98%. Fewer false-positive screens would occur with a single 60-minute cortisol concentration compared with a single 30-minute concentration (P < .001). High-dose CST screening may safely be interpreted with single 60-minute poststimulation cortisol serum concentrations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.12788/jhm.2928

  8 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29512963
[Au] Autor:Makaya T; Gilbert J; Ryan F; Watts W
[Ad] Address:Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, England.
[Ti] Title:Adrenal insufficiency, steroid sick day rules and the paediatric endocrine nurse.
[So] Source:Nurs Child Young People;30(2):26-31, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2046-2344
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Clinical governance processes are important for improving patient care. Patients with adrenal insufficiency are at significant risk if they have an adrenal crisis and require steroid therapy. Families should receive education on managing illness or stress, that is, steroid sick day rules. Most of this education is delivered by children's nurses. Two local cases of mortality related to adrenal insufficiency were reviewed and a questionnaire audit was undertaken to compare the steroid sick day rules education provided to patients and their families with published standards. Most training (75%) was delivered by nurses. Most families/patients (94%) had received written information on oral dosing for steroid sick day rules, and were confident about when/how to double up oral steroid doses (78%). Fewer families recalled being given written information about the emergency hydrocortisone injection (53%), and fewer were confident about how to give the injection (46%). Several important changes and modifications to clinical practice have been implemented in response to the clinical governance findings. These include setting up notification 'red flags' on patients' electronic records and holding specialist family teaching sessions on steroid sick day rules.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.7748/ncyp.2018.e1022

  9 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29512322
[Au] Autor:Major A; Chacko K
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Internal Medicine Residency Training Program, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Colorado, Aurora, USA.
[Ti] Title:Routine vaccinations as a precipitant of adrenal crisis in adrenal insufficiency.
[So] Source:Intern Med J;48(3):360-361, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1445-5994
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/imj.13720

  10 / 12404 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29501407
[Au] Autor:Bamborschke D; Pergande M; Becker K; Körber F; Dötsch J; Vierzig A; Weber LT; Cirak S
[Ad] Address:Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
[Ti] Title:A novel mutation in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase causing congenital brain malformation.
[So] Source:Brain Dev;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7131
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Recently recessive mutations in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1) have been published as a cause of syndromic congenital nephrotic syndrome with adrenal insufficiency. We have identified a case with fetal hydrops and brain malformations due to a mutation in SGPL1. CASE REPORT: We report a patient presenting with severe fetal hydrops, congenital nephrotic syndrome and adrenal calcifications. MRI imaging showed generalized cortical atrophy with simplified gyral pattern and hypoplastic temporal lobes as well as cerebellar hypoplasia and hyperintensity in the pons. The boy deceased at 6 weeks of age. Via whole exome sequencing, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift mutation c.1233delC (p.Phe411Leufs 56) in SGPL1. CONCLUSION: In our patient, we describe a novel mutation in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1) leading to severe brain malformation. Neurodevelopmental phenotypes have been reported earlier, but not described in detail. To this end, we present a review on all published SGPL1-mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations focusing on neurodevelopmental outcomes. We hypothesized on the severe neurological phenotypes, which might be due to disruption of neuronal autophagy. Mutations in SGPL1 shall be considered in the differential diagnosis of fetal hydrops as well as congenital brain malformations and neuropathies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 1241 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information