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Search on : Agoraphobia [Words]
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[PMID]: 29522942
[Au] Autor:Gulpers B; Lugtenburg A; Zuidersma M; Verhey FRJ; Voshaar RCO
[Ad] Address:VIRENZE-RIAGG Maastricht, METggz Maastricht, Regional Institute for Mental Health Care in Outpatients, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Maastricht University Medical Center, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS) / Alzheimer Centre Limburg and Department of Psychiatry and Psychology / MUMC, M
[Ti] Title:Anxiety disorders and figural fluency: A measure of executive function.
[So] Source:J Affect Disord;234:38-44, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2517
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Anxiety possibly interferes with executive functioning, although most studies rely on anxiety symptoms or lack control for comorbid depression. The objective of the present study is to examine the association between executive functioning and (individual) anxiety disorders with ak,ld without controlling for depression. METHOD: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder with and without agoraphobia, agoraphobia, social phobia, as well as depressive disorder according to DSM-IV criteria were assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview in 82,360 community-dwelling people participating in the Lifelines cohort. Figural fluency as a measure of executive functioning was assessed with the Ruff Figural Fluency Test (RFTT). Linear regression analyses with the RFFT score as the dependent variable and psychiatric diagnosis as independent variables (dummies) were performed, adjusted for potential confounders. Multivariate results are presented with and without adjustment for depression. RESULTS: Presence of any anxiety disorder was associated with worse performance on the RFFT (B = - 0.78, SE = 0.32, p = .015), independent of depression. No dose-response relationship with the number of anxiety disorders was found. Only agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder were significantly associated with the RFFT score in the multivariate models. Agoraphobia remained significant when further adjusted for depressive disorder (B = - 1.14, SE = 0.41, p < .01), while GAD did not (B = 0.013, SE = 0.431, p = .975). LIMITATIONS: Executive function was tested by only one measure, namely figural fluency. CONCLUSION: Agoraphobia is associated with worse executive functioning. Treatment of agoraphobia could be influenced by the executive dysfunction which clinicians should be aware of when regular treatment fails.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29394251
[Au] Autor:Feinstein JS; Khalsa SS; Yeh HW; Wohlrab C; Simmons WK; Stein MB; Paulus MP
[Ad] Address:Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Examining the short-term anxiolytic and antidepressant effect of Floatation-REST.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0190292, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Floatation-REST (Reduced Environmental Stimulation Therapy) reduces sensory input to the nervous system through the act of floating supine in a pool of water saturated with Epsom salt. The float experience is calibrated so that sensory signals from visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, thermal, tactile, vestibular, gravitational and proprioceptive channels are minimized, as is most movement and speech. This open-label study aimed to examine whether Floatation-REST would attenuate symptoms of anxiety, stress, and depression in a clinical sample. Fifty participants were recruited across a spectrum of anxiety and stress-related disorders (posttraumatic stress, generalized anxiety, panic, agoraphobia, and social anxiety), most (n = 46) with comorbid unipolar depression. Measures of self-reported affect were collected immediately before and after a 1-hour float session, with the primary outcome measure being the pre- to post-float change score on the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory. Irrespective of diagnosis, Floatation-REST substantially reduced state anxiety (estimated Cohen's d > 2). Moreover, participants reported significant reductions in stress, muscle tension, pain, depression and negative affect, accompanied by a significant improvement in mood characterized by increases in serenity, relaxation, happiness and overall well-being (p < .0001 for all variables). In reference to a group of 30 non-anxious participants, the effects were found to be more robust in the anxious sample and approaching non-anxious levels during the post-float period. Further analysis revealed that the most severely anxious participants reported the largest effects. Overall, the procedure was well-tolerated, with no major safety concerns stemming from this single session. The findings from this initial study need to be replicated in larger controlled trials, but suggest that Floatation-REST may be a promising technique for transiently reducing the suffering in those with anxiety and depression. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03051074.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anxiety/therapy
Depression/therapy
Sensory Deprivation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190292

  3 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29383412
[Au] Autor:Ströhle A; Fydrich T
[Ad] Address:Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Campus Charité Mitte, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117, Berlin, Deutschland. andreas.stroehle@charite.de.
[Ti] Title:Angsterkrankungen: Welche Psychotherapie für wen? [Anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?]
[So] Source:Nervenarzt;89(3):271-275, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1433-0407
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:According to the Federal Healthcare Survey (Bundesgesundheitssurvey), approximately 15% of the German population fulfil the diagnostic criteria for at least one anxiety disorder within (any) 1 year. Women are affected approximately twice as often as men. The study by the Robert Koch Institute included the systematic assessment of panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobias; therefore, the question for both those affected and the treating therapist is "anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?" is of great clinical and healthcare political importance. We therefore review the available literature for answering three more specific questions: 1) what are the most suitable forms of psychotherapy, 2) which psychotherapy is most promising for an individual patient and diagnosis (differential evaluation of indications) and 3) what is the best approach to nonresponse or avoidance of the treatment offered? National and international guidelines agree that cognitive behavioral therapy is the psychotherapy of first choice in most patients with anxiety disorders. In cases of nonresponse or lack of availability of the appropriate therapy, psychodynamic therapy or pharmacotherapy can also be recommended. For individualized treatment recommendations we do not have empirical evidence. Also, no evidence-based (individual) recommendations are available for non-responders;however, there are some preferred strategies based on a clinical consensus.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00115-018-0481-9

  4 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29212135
[Au] Autor:Keefe JR; Milrod BL; Gallop R; Barber JP; Chambless DL
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
[Ti] Title:What is the effect on comorbid personality disorder of brief panic-focused psychotherapy in patients with panic disorder?
[So] Source:Depress Anxiety;35(3):239-247, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6394
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: No studies of psychotherapies for panic disorder (PD) have examined effects on comorbid personality disorders (PersD), yet half such patients have a PersD. METHODS: In a randomized trial for PD with and without agoraphobia comparing Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (PFPP), PersD was assessed pre-to-post treatment with the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnosis of Axis-II Disorders (SCID-II). For patients completing therapy (n = 118, 54 with PersD), covariance between panic and SCID-II criteria improvements was analyzed. SCID-II diagnostic remission and recovery were evaluated. Comparative efficacy of PFPP versus CBT for improving PersD was analyzed both for the average patient, and as a function of PersD severity. RESULTS: 37 and 17% of PersD patients experienced diagnostic PersD remission and recovery, respectively. Larger reductions in PersD were related to more panic improvement, with a modest effect size (r = 0.28). Although there was no difference between treatments in their ability to improve PersD for the average patient (d = 0.01), patients meeting more PersD criteria did better in PFPP compared to CBT (P = .007), with PFPP being significantly superior at 11 criteria and above (d = 0.66; 3 more criteria lost). CONCLUSIONS: PersD presenting in the context of primary PD rarely resolves during psychotherapies focused on PD, and change in PersD only moderately tracks panic improvements, indicating non-overlap of the constructs. Patients receiving panic-focused psychotherapies may require additional treatment for their PersD. PFPP may be superior at improving severe PersD, but replication of this finding is required.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/da.22708

  5 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29175809
[Au] Autor:Christoforou M; Sáez Fonseca JA; Tsakanikos E
[Ad] Address:Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Two Novel Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Mobile Apps for Agoraphobia: Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(11):e398, 2017 Nov 24.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Despite the large body of literature demonstrating the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral treatments for agoraphobia, many patients remain untreated because of various barriers to treatment. Web-based and mobile-based interventions targeting agoraphobia may provide a solution to this problem, but there is a lack of research investigating the efficacy of such interventions. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to evaluate for the first time the effectiveness of a self-guided mobile-based intervention primarily targeting agoraphobic symptoms, with respect to a generic mobile app targeting anxiety. METHODS: A Web-based randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared a novel mobile app designed to target agoraphobia (called Agoraphobia Free) with a mobile app designed to help with symptoms of anxiety in general (called Stress Free). Both interventions were based on established cognitive behavioral principles. We recruited participants (N=170) who self-identified as having agoraphobia and assessed them online at baseline, midpoint, and end point (posttreatment) over a period of 12 weeks. The primary outcome was symptom severity measured by the Panic and Agoraphobia Scale. RESULTS: Both groups had statistically significant improvements in symptom severity over time (difference -5.97, 95% CI -8.49 to -3.44, P<.001 for Agoraphobia Free and -6.35, 95% CI -8.82 to -3.87, P<.001 for Stress Free), but there were no significant between-group differences on the primary outcome (difference 0.38, 95% CI -1.96 to 3.20, P=.64). CONCLUSIONS: This is, to our knowledge, the first RCT to provide evidence that people who identify as having agoraphobia may equally benefit from a diagnosis-specific and a transdiagnostic mobile-based intervention. We also discuss clinical and research implications for the development and dissemination of mobile mental health apps. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 98453199; http://www.isrctn.com /ISRCTN98453199 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6uR5vsdZw).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.7747

  6 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29492960
[Au] Autor:Dold M; Bartova L; Mendlewicz J; Souery D; Serretti A; Porcelli S; Zohar J; Montgomery S; Kasper S
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:Clinical correlates of augmentation/combination treatment strategies in major depressive disorder.
[So] Source:Acta Psychiatr Scand;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0447
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This multicenter, multinational, cross-sectional study aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes associated with augmentation/combination treatment strategies in major depressive disorder (MDD). METHOD: Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment features of 1410 adult MDD patients were compared between MDD patients treated with monotherapy and augmentation/combination medication using descriptive statistics, analyses of covariance (ancova), and Spearman's correlation analyses. RESULTS: 60.64% of all participants received augmentation and/or combination strategies with a mean number of 2.18 ± 1.22 simultaneously prescribed psychiatric drugs. We found male gender, older age, Caucasian descent, higher weight, low educational status, absence of occupation, psychotic symptoms, melancholic and atypical features, suicide risk, in-patient treatment, longer duration of hospitalization, some psychiatric comorbidities (panic disorder, agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and bulimia nervosa), comorbid somatic comorbidity in general and concurrent hypertension, thyroid dysfunction, diabetes, and heart disease in particular, higher current and retrospective Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total scores, treatment resistance, and higher antidepressant dosing to be significantly associated with augmentation/combination treatment. These findings were corroborated when examining the number of concurrently administered psychiatric drugs in the statistical analyses. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a clear association between augmentation/combination strategies and treatment-resistant/difficult-to-treat MDD conditions characterized by severe symptomatology and high amount of psychiatric and somatic comorbidities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/acps.12870

  7 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29475102
[Au] Autor:Laurito LD; Loureiro CP; Dias RV; Vigne P; de Menezes GB; Freire RC; Stangier U; Fontenelle LF
[Ad] Address:Obsessive, Compulsive, and Anxiety Spectrum Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Predictors of benzodiazepine use in a transdiagnostic sample of panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;262:237-245, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We investigated the rates of current and past benzodiazepine (BZD) use in a sample of 102 subjects attending specialized anxiety disorder clinics, including panic disorder (PD; N = 36), social anxiety disorder (SAD; N = 28) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; N = 38) patients. Almost 56% of the entire sample was using BZDs at the moment of the assessment, and 74.5% described having used them at some point during their lifetimes. The duration of psychiatric treatment and a lifetime history of PD, but not any other "transdiagnostic" measure of severity (such as the Panic and Agoraphobia Scale, the Social Phobia Inventory, the Dimensional Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-36, and the Beck Inventories) were independent risk factors for current prescription of BZDs. Patients who continued to use BZDs differed from patients who stopped them by being older (both currently and when firstly seen in the clinic), by having a later age at onset of their most significant anxiety disorder, by being more agoraphobic/avoidant, and by believing to be less capable of stopping their BZDs for the fear of not being able to sleep.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29376460
[Au] Autor:Naudé PJW; Roest AM; Stein DJ; de Jonge P; Doornbos B
[Ad] Address:a Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health , Brain Behaviour Unit, University of Cape Town , Cape Town , South Africa.
[Ti] Title:Anxiety disorders and CRP in a population cohort study with 54,326 participants: The LifeLines study.
[So] Source:World J Biol Psychiatry;:1-10, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1814-1412
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Growing evidence indicates that inflammatory processes may play a role in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned about the involvement of inflammation, including C-reactive protein (CRP), in specific anxiety disorders. This study examines the relation between anxiety disorders and CRP. METHODS: Associations of serum CRP with anxiety disorders were determined in a large population study (n = 54,326 participants, mean age = 47 years; 59% female), the LifeLines cohort. Depressive and anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety phobia, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia and agoraphobia without panic disorder) were assessed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. RESULTS: Anxiety disorders, with the exception of social anxiety disorder, were significantly associated with increased CRP. After adjusting for demographics, life style factors, health factors, medication use, depression, and psychological stressors, CRP remained significantly associated with panic disorder with agoraphobia (ß = 0.01, P = .013). Moreover, CRP levels were significantly higher in people with panic disorder with agoraphobia compared to other anxiety disorders, independent of all covariates (F = 3.00, df = 4, P = .021). CONCLUSIONS: Panic disorder with agoraphobia is associated with increased CRP, although the effect size of this association is small. This indicates that neuroinflammatory mechanisms may play a potential role in its pathophysiology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/15622975.2018.1433325

  9 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451585
[Au] Autor:de Matos MB; de Mola CL; Trettim JP; Jansen K; da Silva RA; Souza LDM; Ores LDC; Molina ML; Coelho FT; Pinheiro RT; Quevedo LA
[Ad] Address:Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde e Comportamento, Universidade Católica de Pelotas (UCPel), Pelotas, RS, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Psychoactive substance abuse and dependence and its association with anxiety disorders: a population-based study of young adults in Brazil.
[So] Source:Rev Bras Psiquiatr;:0, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1809-452X
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between abuse of and dependence on different psychoactive substances and the presence of anxiety disorders in a sample of young adults from a city in southern Brazil. METHODS: Between 2007 and 2009, we carried out a cross-sectional, population-based study of individuals aged 18-24 years who lived in Pelotas, a city in southern Brazil. We evaluated anxiety disorders using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview 5.0 (MINI), and use of psychoactive substances with the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST 2.0/0MS). We used Fisher's exact test for univariate analysis, and Poisson regression models with robust variance for multivariable analysis. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 1,560 young adults. The overall prevalence of abuse/dependence was 26.9% for alcohol, 24.9% for tobacco, and 7.3% for illicit substances. Individuals with agoraphobia had a 32% higher prevalence of tobacco abuse/dependence (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.32 [95%CI 1.01-1.74]). Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) had a 2.41-fold (95%CI 1.22-4.77) and 1.76-fold (95%CI 1.00-3.11) higher prevalence of illicit substance abuse/dependence, respectively. CONCLUSION: In this population-based sample, we found associations between GAD, PTSD, and increased prevalence of illicit substance abuse/dependence. In addition, individuals with agoraphobia seem to have increased tobacco abuse/dependence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 3807 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451073
[Au] Autor:van der Velden PG; Pecoraro M; Houwerzijl MS; van der Meulen E
[Ad] Address:INTERVICT, 7899 Tilburg University , The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Mental Health Problems Among Whistleblowers: A Comparative Study.
[So] Source:Psychol Rep;:33294118757681, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1558-691X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Whistleblowers play a very important and indispensable role in society and health care sector, but their act may elicit retaliation and other negative effects, which may impact their mental health. The main aim of the present comparative study is to assess to what extent whistleblowers ( N = 27) more often suffer from severe mental health problems than other population-based groups in the Netherlands, i.e., matched controls ( N = 135), cancer patients ( N = 130), persons with (partial) work disabilities ( N = 194), physically "healthy" persons ( N = 200), and general population ( N = 1026), using the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey scales (for general mental health) and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised scales (for specific mental health problems: depression, anxiety, agoraphobia, interpersonal sensitivity and distrust, and sleeping problems). Logistic regression analyses showed that the prevalence of general mental health problems was much higher than among matched controls and people with work disabilities but similar to cancer patient when controlling for demographics. About 85% suffered from severe to very severe anxiety, depression, interpersonal sensitivity and distrust, agoraphobia symptoms, and/or sleeping problems, and 48% reached clinical levels of these specific mental health problems. These specific mental health problems were much more prevalent than among the general population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0033294118757681


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