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Search on : Alice and in and Wonderland and Syndrome [Words]
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[PMID]: 29272995
[Au] Autor:Kadia BM; Ekabe CJ; Agborndip E
[Ad] Address:Foumbot District Hospital, Foumbot, Cameroon. benjaminmomokadia@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Primary care challenges of an obscure case of "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome in a patient with severe malaria in a resource-constrained setting: a case report.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;17(1):789, 2017 12 22.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome (AIWS) is a rare neurological abnormality characterized by distortions of visual perceptions, body schema and experience of time. AIWS has been reported in patients with various infections such as infectious mononucleosis, H1N1 influenza, Cytomegalovirus encephalitis, and typhoid encephalopathy. However, AIWS occurring in a patient with severe malaria is less familiar and could pose serious primary care challenges in a low-income context. CASE PRESENTATION: A 9-year-old male of black African ethnicity was brought by his parents to our primary care hospital because for 2 days he had been experiencing intermittent sudden perceptions of his parents' heads and objects around him either "shrinking" or "expanding". The visual perceptions were usually brief and resolved spontaneously. One week prior to the onset of the visual problem, he had developed an intermittent high grade fever that was associated with other severe constitutional symptoms. Based on the historical and clinical data that were acquired, severe malaria was suspected and this was confirmed by hyperparasitaemia on blood film analysis. The patient was treated with quinine for 10 days. Apart from a single episode of generalized tonic-clonic seizures that was observed on the first day of treatment, the overall clinical progress was good. The visual illusions completely resolved and no further abnormalities were recorded during 3 months of follow-up. CONCLUSION: Symptoms of AIWS usually resolve spontaneously or after treatment of an underlying cause. In our case, the successful treatment of severe malaria coincided with a complete regression of AIWS whose aetiology was poorly-elucidated given the resource constraints. In any case, the good outcome of our patient aligns with previous reports on acute AIWS that highlight a limited need for excessive investigation and treatment modalities which are, in passing, predominantly unaffordable in resource-limited primary care settings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180120
[Lr] Last revision date:180120
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-017-2918-3

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[PMID]: 28449649
[Au] Autor:Yokoyama T; Okamura T; Takahashi M; Momose T; Kondo S
[Ad] Address:Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan.
[Ti] Title:A case of recurrent depressive disorder presenting with Alice in Wonderland syndrome: psychopathology and pre- and post-treatment FDG-PET findings.
[So] Source:BMC Psychiatry;17(1):150, 2017 04 27.
[Is] ISSN:1471-244X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a rare neuropsychiatric syndrome that typically manifests in distortion of extrapersonal visual image, altered perception of one's body image, and a disturbed sense of the passage of distance and time. Several conditions have been reported to contribute to AIWS, although its biological basis is still unknown. Here, we present the first case demonstrating a clear concurrence of recurrent depressive disorder and AIWS. The clinical manifestations and pre- and post-treatment fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomographic (FDG-PET) images provide insights into the psychopathological and biological basis of AIWS. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a 63-year-old Japanese male who developed two distinct episodes of major depression concurrent with AIWS. In addition to typical AIWS perceptual symptoms, he complained of losing the ability to intuitively grasp the seriousness of news and the value of money, which implies disturbance of high-order cognition related to estimating magnitude and worth. Both depression and AIWS remitted after treatment in each episode. Pre-treatment FDG-PET images showed significant hypometabolism in the frontal cortex and hypermetabolism in the occipital and parietal cortex. Post-treatment images showed improvement of these abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical co-occurrence of depressive episodes and presentation of AIWS can be interpreted to mean that they have certain functional disturbances in common. In view of incapacity, indifference, devitalization, altered perception of one's body image, and disturbed sense of time and space, the features of AIWS analogous to those of psychotic depression imply a common psychopathological basis. These high-order brain dysfunctions are possibly associated with the metabolic abnormalities in visual and parietotemporal association cortices that we observed on the pre- and post-treatment FDG-PET images in this case, while the hypometabolism in the frontal cortex is probably associated with depressive symptoms.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alice in Wonderland Syndrome/diagnosis
Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alice in Wonderland Syndrome/complications
Alice in Wonderland Syndrome/diagnostic imaging
Alice in Wonderland Syndrome/physiopathology
Depressive Disorder, Major/complications
Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnostic imaging
Depressive Disorder, Major/physiopathology
Diagnosis, Differential
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Frontal Lobe/diagnostic imaging
Frontal Lobe/physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parietal Lobe/diagnostic imaging
Parietal Lobe/physiopathology
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0Z5B2CJX4D (Fluorodeoxyglucose F18)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180118
[Lr] Last revision date:180118
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12888-017-1314-2

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[PMID]: 29074056
[Au] Autor:Farooq O; Fine EJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Pediatric Neurology, Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York; Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. Electronic address: ofarooq3@buffalo.edu.
[Ti] Title:Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: A Historical and Medical Review.
[So] Source:Pediatr Neurol;, 2017 Aug 24.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5150
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Alice in Wonderland syndrome is a disorienting neurological condition that affects human perception to the senses of vision, hearing, touch, sensation, and the phenomenon of time. Individuals affected with Alice in Wonderland syndrome can experience alterations in their perception to the size of objects or their own body parts, known as metamorphopsias. It is known to occur in conditions including migraine, epilepsy, as well as certain intoxicants and infectious diseases. The name refers to Lewis Carrol's well-known children's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, in which the title character experiences alterations of sensation in which she felt that her body had grown too tall or too small, or parts of her body were changing shape, size, or relationship to the rest of her body. The syndrome was described in 1952 by Caro Lippman, and given its name in 1955 by John Todd. The metamorphopsias characteristic of this condition are also sometimes referred to as Lilliputian hallucinations, as a reference to the fictional island of Lilliput in the novel Gulliver's Travels, written by Jonathan Swift in 1726. As such, many literary and medical publications have roots in the description of this syndrome. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literary and historical significance of Alice in Wonderland syndrome, as well as to provide the reader with a medical overview of the condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 28658652
[Au] Autor:Pitron V; de Vignemont F
[Ad] Address:Institut Jean Nicod, UMR 8129, ENS/EHESS/CNRS, IEC, PSL Research University, 29 rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France; AP-HP, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Ouest, Service de Psychiatrie de l'adulte et du sujet âgé, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France. Electronic address: victor.pitron@ens.fr.
[Ti] Title:Beyond differences between the body schema and the body image: insights from body hallucinations.
[So] Source:Conscious Cogn;53:115-121, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2376
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The distinction between the body schema and the body image has become the stock in trade of much recent work in cognitive neuroscience and philosophy. Yet little is known about the interactions between these two types of body representations. We need to account not only for their dissociations in rare cases, but also for their convergence most of the time. Indeed in our everyday life the body we perceive does not conflict with the body we act with. Are the body image and the body schema then somehow reshaping each other or are they relatively independent and do they only happen to be congruent? On the basis of the study of bodily hallucinations, we consider which model can best account for the body schema/body image interactions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170715
[Lr] Last revision date:170715
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28596463
[Au] Autor:Kikuchi R; Akaike S
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Ushioda General Hospital.
[Ti] Title:[Prosopometamorphopsia].
[So] Source:Brain Nerve;69(6):607-613, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1881-6096
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:Facial perception relies on both configural processing and analytical processing. Seventeen years ago, Haxby and colleagues proposed an influential neural model in which a core system and an extended system were involved in facial processing. Herein, first analyze configural processing on the basis of the Haxby model. We review previous findings from published electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies, and describe previously reported clinical cases, and finally we discuss our own clinical cases an findings. Based on this work we have sketched out a new framework for facial perception suggesting that suggests that the extended system includes more widely distributed regions than originally expected.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Facial Expression
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Vision Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alice in Wonderland Syndrome
Brain Mapping
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171020
[Lr] Last revision date:171020
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170610
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.11477/mf.1416200792

  6 / 113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28189272
[Au] Autor:O'Toole P; Modestino EJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, United States. Electronic address: potoole@bu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: A real life version of Lewis Carroll's novel.
[So] Source:Brain Dev;39(6):470-474, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7131
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Alice in Wonderland Syndrome was originally coined by Dr. John Todd in 1955. The syndrome is named after the sensations experienced by the character Alice in Lewis Carroll's novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome consists of metamorphopsia (seeing something in a distorted fashion), bizarre distortions of their body image, and bizarre perceptual distortions of form, size, movement or color. Additionally, patients with Alice in Wonderland Syndrome can experience auditory hallucinations and changes in their perception of time. Currently, there is no known specific cause of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome. However, theories point to infections such as the Epstein-Barr virus, medications such as topiramate and associated migraines. Neuroimaging studies have revealed brain regions involved with the manifestation of symptoms. These include the temporo-parietal junction within the temporal lobe and the visual pathway, specifically the occipital lobe. There are no current treatments for Alice in Wonderland Syndrome. Further research is needed to find better treatments for Alice in Wonderland Syndrome and to elucidate the exact cause or causes of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170507
[Lr] Last revision date:170507
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28081974
[Au] Autor:García-Cabo C; Fernández-Domínguez J; García-Rodríguez R; Mateos Marcos V
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Neurología, Centro Médico de Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias, España. Electronic address: c.garciacabo@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Síndrome de Alicia en el País de las Maravillas como primera y única manifestación de un ictus isquémico. Alice in Wonderland syndrome as the initial and sole manifestation of ischaemic stroke.
[So] Source:Neurologia;, 2017 Jan 09.
[Is] ISSN:1578-1968
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng; spa
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170113
[Lr] Last revision date:170113
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27924353
[Au] Autor:Lewandowski K; Bartlett RH
[Ad] Address:Klinik für Anästhesiologie, Intensivmedizin und Schmerztherapie, Elisabeth-Krankenhaus, Klara-Kopp-Weg 1, 45138, Essen, Deutschland. k.lewandowski@contilia.de.
[Ti] Title:Der alte Mann und die "I sea U" : Essay über Vertrauen, Schicksal und Evidenz ­ im Stil von Hemingway. [The old man and the I sea U : Essay on faith, fate and evidence - after the manner of Hemingway].
[So] Source:Anaesthesist;66(1):34-44, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1432-055X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Robert Bartlett, emeritus Professor of surgery at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, USA, transformed classical works of world literature (Charles Dickens: A Christmas Carol, Lewis Carroll: Alice in Wonderland) into teaching aids for advanced training in intensive care medicine. He recently turned his hand to the well-known work of Ernest Hemingway: the Nobel Prize winning novel The Old Man and the Sea. Subsequent to Robert Bartlett's essay this article provides background information and comments on the current problems in modern intensive care medicine addressed in his essay.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Critical Care
Literature
Teaching Materials
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy
Sepsis/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170916
[Lr] Last revision date:170916
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00101-016-0239-3

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[PMID]: 27318928
[Au] Autor:Dieguez S; Lopez C
[Ad] Address:Laboratory for Cognitive and Neurological Sciences, Unité de Neurologie, Département de Médecine, Université de Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:The bodily self: Insights from clinical and experimental research.
[So] Source:Ann Phys Rehabil Med;60(3):198-207, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1877-0665
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This review article summarizes neuropsychological descriptions of abnormal body representations in brain-damaged patients and recent neuroscientific investigations of their sensorimotor underpinnings in healthy participants. The first part of the article describes unilateral disorders of the bodily self, such as asomatognosia, feelings of amputation, supernumerary phantom limbs and somatoparaphrenia, as well as descriptions of non-lateralized disorders of the bodily self, including Alice in Wonderland syndrome and autoscopic hallucinations. Because the sensorimotor mechanisms of these disorders are unclear, we focus on clinical descriptions and insist on the importance of reporting clinical cases to better understand the full range of bodily disorders encountered in neurological diseases. The second part of the article presents the advantages of merging neuroscientific approaches of the bodily self with immersive virtual reality, robotics and neuroprosthetics to foster the understanding of the multisensory, motor and neural mechanisms of bodily representations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 170613
[Lr] Last revision date:170613
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 113 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27174609
[Au] Autor:Yrondi A; Schmitt L; Arbus C
[Ad] Address:Service de psychiatrie et psychologie médicale, CHU Toulouse Purpan, 330, avenue de Grande-Bretagne, 31059 Toulouse, France; UMR 825, Inserm, CHU Toulouse Purpan, 31059 Toulouse, France. Electronic address: antoineyrondi@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Syndrome d'Alice au pays des merveilles : prodrome d'un épisode dépressif à caractéristique mélancolique. ["Alice in wonderland syndrome", a precursor of depressive disorder with melancholic characteristics].
[So] Source:Encephale;43(5):495-497, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0013-7006
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 171002
[Lr] Last revision date:171002
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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