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[PMID]: 29480431
[Au] Autor:Camargo JA
[Ad] Address:Unidad Docente de Ecología, Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad de Alcalá, 28805, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. julio.camargo@uah.es.
[Ti] Title:Responses of aquatic macrophytes to anthropogenic pressures: comparison between macrophyte metrics and indices.
[So] Source:Environ Monit Assess;190(3):173, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2959
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Macrophyte responses to anthropogenic pressures in two rivers of Central Spain were assessed to check if simple metrics can exhibit a greater discriminatory and explanatory power than complex indices at small spatial scales. Field surveys were undertaken during the summer of 2014 (Duraton River) and the spring of 2015 (Tajuña River). Aquatic macrophytes were sampled using a sampling square (45 × 45 cm). In the middle Duraton River, macrophytes responded positively to the presence of a hydropower dam and a small weir, with Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton pectinatus being relatively favored. Index of Macrophytes (IM) was better than Macroscopic Aquatic Vegetation Index (MAVI) and Fluvial Macrophyte Index (FMI) in detecting these responses, showing positive and significant correlations with total coverage, species richness, and species diversity. In the upper Tajuña River, macrophytes responded both negatively and positively to the occurrence of a trout farm effluent and a small weir, with Leptodictyum riparium and Veronica anagallis-aquatica being relatively favored. Although IM, MAVI, and FMI detected both negative and positive responses, correlations of IM with total coverage, species richness, and species diversity were higher. Species evenness was not sensitive enough to detect either positive or negative responses of aquatic macrophytes along the study areas. Overall, traditional and simple metrics (species composition, total coverage, species richness, species diversity) exhibited a greater discriminatory and explanatory power than more recent and complex indices (IM, MAVI, FMI) when assessing responses of aquatic macrophytes to anthropogenic pressures at impacted specific sites.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10661-018-6549-y

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[PMID]: 29348085
[Au] Autor:Khan RU; Mehmood S; Khan SU
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany, University of Science & Technology Bannu, KPK, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Toxic effect of common poisonous plants of district Bannu, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.
[So] Source:Pak J Pharm Sci;31(1):57-67, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1011-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present paper was a part of Ph.D research work, conducted during the year 2014, in which 87 poisonous plants belonging to 54 genera, were collected, documented and preserved in the herbarium of Bannu, Department of Botany UST, Bannu Khyber Pakhtunkwa Pakistan. The plants were identified botanically, arranged alphabetically along with their Latin name, family name, common name, poisonous parts, toxicity, affects, toxin and their effects. Aim of the study was to induce awareness in the local people of district Bannu about the poisonous effects of the commonly used plants. Data about poisonous effect were collected from the local experienced and mostly old age people through questionnaire. Some information were collected from a number of veterinary texts and literature. The most important plants genera studied in the area were Brassica 6 species (11.11%), Lathyrus 5 spp (9.26%), Astragalus, Euphorbia and Prunus were with 4 spp (7.40%). Datura, Jatropha, Ranunculus, Solanum and Sorghum were with 3 spp (5.56%) while Allium, Amaranthus, Chenopodium, Melilotus and Taxus were with 2 spp (3.70%). These 15 genera contribute 48 species (55.17 %) while the remaining 39 genera have single species each and contribute 44.83% to the total poisonous flora of the research area. Other important poisonous plants were Anagallis arvensis L., Cannabis sativa, Datura stramonium L., D. metel L., Euphorbia species, Heliotropium europaeum, Ipomoea tricolor, Jatropha curcas, Lolium temulentum L., Malus domestica, Mangifera indica L., Medicago sativa L., Melilotus alba Desr., M. officinalis (L.) Lam., Mirabilis jalapa L., Narcissus tazetta, Nicotiana tabacum L., Sorghum halepense (L) Pers., and Xanthium strumarium. It was concluded that the local population had poor knowledge about the poisonous effect of the plants and the present research work was anticipated for use by health care professionals, veterinarians, farmers, homeowners, as well as botanically curious individuals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180119
[Lr] Last revision date:180119
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29272716
[Au] Autor:Kroflic A; Germ M; Golob A; Stibilj V
[Ad] Address:"Jozef Stefan" Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
[Ti] Title:Does extensive agriculture influence the concentration of trace elements in the aquatic plant Veronica anagallis-aquatica?
[So] Source:Ecotoxicol Environ Saf;150:123-128, 2018 Apr 15.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2414
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study describes the influence of extensive agriculture on the concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Cd, Se, Pb and Zn in sediments and in the aquatic plant Veronica anagallis-aquatica. The investigation, spanning 4 years, was conducted on three watercourses in Slovenia (Psata, Lipsenjscica and Zerovniscica) flowing through agricultural areas. The different sampling sites were chosen on the basis of the presence of different activities in these regions: dairy farming, stock raising and extensive agriculture. The concentrations of the selected elements in sediments and V. anagallis-aquatica were below the literature background values. The distribution of the selected elements among different plant parts (roots, stems and leaves) were also investigated. The majority of the studied elements, with the exception of Zn and Cu, were accumulated mainly in root tissues.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28389355
[Au] Autor:Soberón JR; Sgariglia MA; Pastoriza AC; Soruco EM; Jäger SN; Labadie GR; Sampietro DA; Vattuone MA
[Ad] Address:Cátedra de Fitoquímica, Instituto de Estudios Farmacológicos "Dr. A.R. Sampietro", Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Ayacucho 471, T4000INI San Miguel de Tucumán, Tucumán, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Godo
[Ti] Title:Antifungal activity and cytotoxicity of extracts and triterpenoid saponins obtained from the aerial parts of Anagallis arvensis L.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;203:233-240, 2017 May 05.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Anagallis arvensis L. (Primulaceae) is used in argentinean northwestern traditional medicine to treat fungal infections. We are reporting the isolation and identification of compounds with antifungal activity against human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, and toxicity evaluation. AIM OF THE STUDY: to study the antifungal activity of extracts and purified compounds obtained form A. arvensis aerial parts, alone and in combinations with fluconazole (FLU), and to study the toxicity of the active compounds. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Disk diffusion assays were used to perform an activity-guided isolation of antifungal compounds from the aerial parts of A. arvensis. Broth dilution checkerboard and viable cell count assays were employed to determine the effects of samples and combinations of FLU + samples against Candida albicans. The chemical structures of active compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Genotoxic and haemolytic effects of the isolated compounds were determined. RESULTS: Four triterpenoid saponins (1-4) were identified. Anagallisin C (AnC), exerted the highest inhibitory activity among the assayed compounds against C. albicans reference strain (ATCC 10231), with MIC-0 =1µg/mL. The Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI=0.129) indicated a synergistic effect between AnC (0.125µg/mL) and FLU (0.031µg/mL) against C. albicans ATCC 10231. AnC inhibited C. albicans 12-99 FLU resistant strain (MIC-0 =1µg/mL), and the FICI=0.188 indicated a synergistic effect between AnC (0.125µg/mL) and fluconazole (16µg/mL). The combination AnC+ FLU exerted fungicidal activity against both C. albicans strains. AnC exerted inhibitory activity against C. albicans ATCC 10231 sessile cells (MIC 0=0.5µg/mL and MIC =1µg/mL) and against C. albicans 12-99 sessile cells (MIC 0=0.75µg/mL and MIC =1.25µg/mL). AnC exerted haemolytic effect against human red blood cells at 15µg/mL and did not exerted genotoxic effect on Bacillus subtilis rec strains. CONCLUSIONS: The antifungal activity and lack of genotoxic effects of AnC give support to the traditional use of A. arvensis as antifungal and makes AnC a compound of interest to expand the available antifungal drugs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170423
[Lr] Last revision date:170423
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 27246561
[Au] Autor:Ahmad A; Hadi F; Ali N; Jan AU
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany, University of Malakand, Chakdara, Dir Lower, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Enhanced phytoremediation of cadmium polluted water through two aquatic plants Veronica anagallis-aquatica and Epilobium laxum.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;23(17):17715-29, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Toxic metal-contaminated water is a major threat to sustainable agriculture and environment. Plants have the natural ability to absorb and concentrate essential elements in its tissues from water solution, and this ability of plants can be exploited to remove heavy/toxic metals from the contaminated water. For this purpose, two plants Veronica anagallis-aquatica and Epilobium laxum were hydroponically studied. The effect of different fertilizers (NPK) and plant growth regulators (GA3 and IAA) were evaluated on growth, biomass, free proline, phenolics, and chlorophyll contents, and their role in Cd phytoaccumulation was investigated. Results showed that in both plants, fertilizer addition to media (treatment T4) produced the highest significant increase in growth, biomass (fresh and dry), cadmium concentration, proline, phenolics, and chlorophyll concentrations. The significant effect of GA3 in combination with NPK foliar spray (treatment T12) was observed on most of the growth parameters, Cd concentration, and proline and phenolic contents of the plants. The free proline and total phenolics showed positive correlation with cadmium concentration within plant tissues. Proline showed significantly positive correlation with phenolic contents of root and shoot. Veronica plant demonstrated the hyperaccumulator potential for cadmium as bioconcentration factor (BCF >1) which was much higher than 1, while Epilobium plant showed non-hyperaccumulator potential. It is recommended for further study to investigate the role of Veronica plant for other metals and to study the role of phenolics and proline contents in heavy metal phytoextraction by various plant species.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biodegradation, Environmental
Cadmium/metabolism
Epilobium/physiology
Veronica/physiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anagallis
Biomass
Cadmium/analysis
Chlorophyll
Fertilizers/analysis
Metals, Heavy/analysis
Plant Growth Regulators
Plant Roots/chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Fertilizers); 0 (Metals, Heavy); 0 (Plant Growth Regulators); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); 00BH33GNGH (Cadmium); 1406-65-1 (Chlorophyll)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160602
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-016-6960-2

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[PMID]: 26946117
[Au] Autor:Kroflic A; Germ M; Mechora S; Stibilj V
[Ad] Address:"Jozef Stefan" Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
[Ti] Title:Selenium and its compounds in aquatic plant Veronica anagallis-aquatica.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;151:296-302, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The uptake, distribution and determination of Se and its compounds in macrophyte Veronica anagallis-aquatica were investigated. V. anagallis-aquatica and sediments were sampled in years 2009-2011 and in 2013 in three Slovenian watercourses flowing through an agricultural area, where addition of Se in feedstuffs has been performed for about 25 years. Se content in sediments were up to 0.86 µg g(-1) and in whole plant varied from 0.186 to 1.535 µg g(-1), all on dry weight basis. Se content were measured also in different plant parts; highest content were found in roots and lowest in stems. Separation of extractable Se compounds was performed by ion exchange chromatography and for on-line detection inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used. The results showed that only approximately 24% of Se in the macrophyte was extracted using enzyme Protease XIV. Extractable Se in plant parts varied from 10.5% in roots to 29.6% in leaves. Identification of Se(IV) and Se(VI) was achieved but no Se-amino acids were detected even at highest Se content. According to our results, we assume that 25 years of Se addition in feedstuff shows minimal impact on Se content in the selected agricultural area.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Environmental Monitoring/methods
Selenium Compounds/analysis
Selenium/analysis
Veronica/chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromatography, Ion Exchange
Geologic Sediments/chemistry
Plant Leaves/chemistry
Plant Leaves/growth & development
Plant Roots/chemistry
Plant Roots/growth & development
Seasons
Slovenia
Veronica/growth & development
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Selenium Compounds); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); H6241UJ22B (Selenium)
[Em] Entry month:1611
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160307
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 26140277
[Au] Autor:Psaroudaki A; Nikoloudakis N; Skaracis G; Katsiotis A
[Ad] Address:Department of Crop Science, Laboratory of Plant Breeding and Biometry, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, Athens, Greece ; Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Crete, Tripitos, Sitia Greece.
[Ti] Title:Genetic structure and population diversity of eleven edible herbs of Eastern Crete.
[So] Source:J Biol Res (Thessalon);22(1):7, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1790-045X
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The present work aimed to investigate the genetic structure of 11 edible herbs grown in the wild of eastern Crete that are becoming vulnerable due to habitat destruction and unregulated harvesting. Thirty three populations (268 individuals) of Reichardia picroides, Scolymus hispanicus, Scandix pecten-veneris, Leontodon tuberosus, Cichorium spinosum, Sonchus asper ssp. glaucescens, Urospermum picroides, Prasium majus, Hypochoeris radicata, Centaurea raphanina ssp. raphanina and Anagallis arvensis were collected and identified from nine regions with distinct microclimate (Lassithi prefecture), and their genetic composition was studied by means of RAPD markers. RESULTS: A total of ten primers per population were used to detect genetic diversity and bootstrap analysis was conducted for clustering the samples. High levels of heterogeneity were revealed while the Analysis of Molecular Variance documented that variance was allocated mainly within populations and at a lesser extent among populations. Fst values among regions were moderate to high, suggesting partial population fragmentation. Bayesian structure analysis revealed fine genetic composition and substantial admixture between species present in different regions, although clustering was mainly geographically related. CONCLUSIONS: High altitude regions, with little residential and agricultural development (Kefala, Agrilos, Ziros and Tziritis), were the areas where high biodiversity was detected. On the other hand, coastal regions had lower biodiversity, probably due to degradation of their habitat.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150704
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s40709-015-0030-7

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[PMID]: 24997953
[Au] Autor:Mechora S; Germ M; Stibilj V
[Ad] Address:Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
[Ti] Title:Monitoring of selenium in macrophytes - the case of Slovenia.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;111:464-70, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper examines macrophytes from various locations in Slovenian streams for selenium (Se) content in an attempt to discover if Se contamination is present and if Se uptake varies between sampling sites. For this purpose, macrophytes and water from ten locations in the Notranjska and Central regions (Slovenia) with different land use in the catchment were sampled. To assess the environmental conditions of the streams the Riparian, Channel, and Environment (RCE) inventory was applied, which revealed that investigated stretches of streams fall into RCE classes III, IV and V. The concentration of Se in water at all locations was less than 1µgSeL(-1). The Se content in macrophytes differed between sampling sites, with the highest content of Se in samples from Zerovniscica stream and the lowest in samples from Lipsenjscica stream. The content of Se was the highest in moss samples (3038ngSeg(-1) DM) and in the amphibious species Veronica anagallis-aquatica (1507ngSeg(-1) DM).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Environmental Monitoring
Rivers/chemistry
Selenium/analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bryophyta/metabolism
Seasons
Selenium/metabolism
Slovenia
Veronica/metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); H6241UJ22B (Selenium)
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Cu] Class update date: 140707
[Lr] Last revision date:140707
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140707
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 24389558
[Au] Autor:Menendez-Baceta G; Aceituno-Mata L; Molina M; Reyes-García V; Tardío J; Pardo-de-Santayana M
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Biología (Botánica), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Darwin 2, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Medicinal plants traditionally used in the northwest of the Basque Country (Biscay and Alava), Iberian Peninsula.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;152(1):113-34, 2014 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Many ethnobotanical studies show that people in industrial countries still rely on their traditional knowledge of medicinal plants for self-treatment, although the trend might not be as common as some decades ago. Given the social and public health implications of ethnopharmacological practices, this survey aims at recording and analysing the medicinal plants used in the folk medicine of the Northwest of the Basque Country focusing on how medicinal plants knowledge and practices evolve. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fieldwork consisted of 265 orally consented semi-structured interviews with 207 informants about medicinal uses of plants. Interviews were conducted between September 2008 and January 2011. Informants were on average 76 years old (minimum 45, maximum 95), being more than half of them (112) men. Data collected were structured in use-reports (UR). Following informants' comments, medicinal use-reports were classified as abandoned-UR, when the informants reported that the use was only practiced in the past, and prevalent-UR, when the informants reported to continue the practice. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: A total of 2067 UR for 139 species that belong to 58 botanical families were recorded, being the most important families Asteraceae, Liliaceae sensu latu and Urticaceae. Some of the most important species are commonly used in other European areas (e.g., Chamaemelum nobile, Urtica dioica and Chelidonium majus). However, there are also plants commonly used in the area such as Helleborus viridis or Coronopus didymus, that are scarcely used in other areas, and whose record is an original contribution of the local pharmacopeia. It is also the case of remedies such as the use of Plantago leaves against strains in a local remedy called zantiritu. Overall, and for all variables analysed (total UR, medicinal use-categories, drug preparation and administration), the percentage of UR being currently practiced (prevalence ratio) was very low (near 30%) suggesting a strong decay in the use of traditional medicinal plants. Exceptionally, some species (Chamaemelum nobile, Verbena officinalis or Anagallis arvensis) had a high prevalence ratio, reflecting the fact that this erosion process is not evolving homogeneously. Informants also reported that new species and medicinal plant uses were entering into the local pharmacopeia via non-traditional sources such as books, courses, or the internet. These modern ways are now being used to spread some traditional remedies that in the past were only orally transmitted. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that traditional knowledge is continuously changing, evolving and adapting to the new social and environmental conditions. The image of the local folk medicine as a dying reality doomed to disappear should be reviewed. It also shows the need of a culturally sensitive approach by the official health systems to these practices.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ethnopharmacology
Medicine, Traditional
Plant Preparations/pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Data Collection
Ethnobotany
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phytotherapy
Spain
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Preparations)
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 140214
[Lr] Last revision date:140214
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140107
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 24365639
[Au] Autor:Bhatia H; Sharma YP; Manhas RK; Kumar K
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany, University of Jammu, Jammu-180001, J&K, India.
[Ti] Title:Ethnomedicinal plants used by the villagers of district Udhampur, J&K, India.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;151(2):1005-18, 2014 Feb 03.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: Plants are an integral part of life in many indigenous communities. Besides, being the source of food, fodder, fuel, etc., the use of plants as herbal medicines in curing several ailments goes parallel to the human civilization. Ethnopharmacology involves the investigation of the plants used by the traditional communities and further understand the pharmacological basis of these culturally important medicinal plants. Present study was conducted to enlist the medicinal plants used by the local inhabitants of Udhampur district of Jammu and Kashmir, India. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Direct interviews of the 182 informants were conducted. The data generated through interviews was analysed using quantitative tools like use-value, factor informant consensus and fidelity level. RESULTS: A total of 166 species of flowering plants belonging to 63 families and 145 genera were observed to be medicinal and used to cure 78 ailments. Medicinal plants were mainly from Asteraceae, Solanaceae, Lamiaceae, Poaceae, Fabaceae and Amaranthaceae families. Leaves were the most used plant part in the medicinal preparations. The most important medicinal species of the present study site as per the use-value (UV) were: Achyranthes aspera, Zanthoxylum armatum, Acorus calamus, Syzygium cumini, Phyllanthus emblica, Plumbago zeylanica etc. The important ailment categories classified on the basis of factor informant consensus (Fic) were diabetes, external parasite, liver complaints and gastrointestinal disorders. The maximum number of species was utilized to cure gastrointestinal and dermatological ailments. Important species for each ailment category were also assessed using fidelity level. It was found that the older informants provided more information about the ethnomedicinal plants, but this valuable treasure of traditional knowledge is depleting significantly with the decrease in age and increase in educational level. CONCLUSION: The results of present ethnobotanical survey reveal the rich wealth of indigenous knowledge associated with the villagers of Udhampur district. A number of plants with a high citation values have given some leads for the further pharmocological research. Apart from these highly cited plants, studies need to be done on some other promising plants like Anagallis arvensis, Euphorbia hirta, Ficus benghalensis, Fumaria indica, Prunus persica, Rubus ellipticus, Taraxacum officinale, Tribulus terrestris etc.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Medicine, Traditional
Plants, Medicinal/classification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Data Collection
Female
Humans
India
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Cu] Class update date: 140127
[Lr] Last revision date:140127
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131225
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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