Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Anaplasmosis [Words]
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  1 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510749
[Au] Autor:Sprong H; Azagi T; Hoornstra D; Nijhof AM; Knorr S; Baarsma ME; Hovius JW
[Ad] Address:Centre for Zoonoses & Environmental Microbiology, Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands. hein.sprong@rivm.nl.
[Ti] Title:Control of Lyme borreliosis and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):145, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lyme borreliosis (LB) and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases (TBDs) are diseases that emerge from interactions of humans and domestic animals with infected ticks in nature. Nature, environmental and health policies at (inter)national and local levels affect the risk, disease burden and costs of TBDs. Knowledge on ticks, their pathogens and the diseases they cause have been increasing, and resulted in the discovery of a diversity of control options, which often are not highly effective on their own. Control strategies involving concerted actions from human and animal health sectors as well as from nature managers have not been formulated, let alone implemented. Control of TBDs asks for a "health in all policies" approach, both at the (inter)national level, but also at local levels. For example, wildlife protection and creating urban green spaces are important for animal and human well-being, but may increase the risk of TBDs. In contrast, culling or fencing out deer decreases the risk for TBDs under specific conditions, but may have adverse effects on biodiversity or may be societally unacceptable. Therefore, in the end, nature and health workers together must carry out tailor-made control options for the control of TBDs for humans and animals, with minimal effects on the environment. In that regard, multidisciplinary approaches in environmental, but also medical settings are needed. To facilitate this, communication and collaboration between experts from different fields, which may include patient representatives, should be promoted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2744-5

  2 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29272385
[Au] Autor:Kingry LC; Anacker M; Pritt B; Bjork J; Respicio-Kingry L; Liu G; Sheldon S; Boxrud D; Strain A; Oatman S; Berry J; Sloan L; Mead P; Neitzel D; Kugeler KJ; Petersen JM
[Ad] Address:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Fort Collins, CO.
[Ti] Title:Surveillance for and Discovery of Borrelia Species in US Patients Suspected of Tickborne Illness.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2017 Dec 20.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Tick-transmitted Borrelia species fall into two heterogeneous bacterial complexes comprised of multiple species, the relapsing fever (RF) group and the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato group, which are the causative agents of Lyme borreliosis (LB), the most common tickborne disease in the northern hemisphere. Geographic expansion of human LB in the United States and discovery of emerging Borrelia pathogens underscores the importance of surveillance for disease causing Borrelia. Methods: De-identified clinical specimens, submitted by providers throughout the United States, for patients suspected of LB, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, or babesiosis, were screened using a Borrelia genus level TaqMan PCR. Borrelia species and sequence types (STs) were characterized by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) utilizing next generation sequencing. Results: Among the 7,292 tested specimens tested, five different Borrelia species were identified: two causing LB, B. burgdorferi (n=25) and B. mayonii (n=9), and three RF borreliae, B. hermsii (n=1), B. miyamotoi (n=8), and CandidatusB. johnsonii (n=1), a species previously detected only in the bat tick, Carios kelleyi. ST diversity was greatest for B. burgdorferi positive specimens, with new STs identified primarily among synovial fluids. Conclusion: These results demonstrate broad PCR screening followed by MLST is a powerful surveillance tool for uncovering the spectrum of Borrelia species causing human disease, improving understanding of their geographic distribution, and investigating the correlation between B. burgdorferi STs and joint involvement. Detection of CandidatusB. johnsonii in a patient with suspected tickborne disease suggests this species may be a previously undetected cause of illness in humans with exposure to bat ticks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1107

  3 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29202206
[Au] Autor:Koh FX; Kho KL; Kisomi MG; Wong LP; Bulgiba A; Tan PE; Lim YAL; Nizam QNH; Panchadcharam C; Tay ST
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Ehrlichia and Anaplasma Infections: Serological Evidence and Tick Surveillance in Peninsular Malaysia.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;55(2):269-276, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Little information is available on human anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis in Southeast Asia despite increasing reports of the detection of Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in the ticks. We report herein the serological findings against the tick-borne pathogens in a group of animal farm workers (n = 87) and indigenous people (n = 102) in Peninsular Malaysia. IgG antibodies against Ehrlichia chaffeensis were detected from 29.9% and 34.3% of farm workers and indigenous people, respectively, using commercial indirect immunofluorescence assays. Comparatively, only 6.9% of the indigenous people but none of the animal farm workers were seropositive to Anaplasma phagocytophilum. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Anaplasmataceae was used to identify Anaplastamataceae in ticks collected from various locations adjacent to the areas where the serological survey was conducted. In this study, a total of 61.5% of ticks infesting farm animals, 37.5% of ticks infesting peri-domestic animals in rural villages, 27.3% of ticks collected from wildlife animals, and 29.1% of questing ticks collected from forest vegetation were positive for Anaplasmataceae DNA. Sequence analyses of 16S rRNA gene region (238 bp) provide the identification for Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma platys, A. phagocytophilum, and Anaplasma spp. closely related to Candidatus Cryptoplasma californiense in ticks. E. chaffeensis DNA was not detected from any ticks, instead, Ehrlichia sp. strain EBm52, Ehrlichia mineirensis and Candidatus Ehrlichia shimanensis are the only Ehrlichia sp. identified from cattle ticks in this study. Further investigation is required to ascertain the occurrence of zoonotic transmission of Ehrlichia and Anaplasma infections in Peninsular Malaysia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjx204

  4 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29503011
[Au] Autor:McFee RB
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency/Family Medicine, Debusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, Lincoln Memorial University, United States.
[Ti] Title:Tick borne illness - Anaplasmosis.
[So] Source:Dis Mon;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8194
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29415034
[Au] Autor:Csordas BG; Cunha RC; Garcia MV; da Silva SS; Leite FL; Andreotti R
[Ad] Address:Programa de Pós-graduação em Doenças Infecciosas e Parasitárias, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Bolsista de Doutorado pela Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil.
[Ti] Title:Molecular characterization of the recombinant protein RmLTI-BmCG-LTB: Protective immunity against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191596, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is found in several tropical and subtropical regions of the world. This parasite transmits pathogens that cause disease, such as babesiosis (Babesia bovis and B. bigemina) and anaplasmosis (Anaplasma marginale). Tick infestations cause enormous livestock losses, and controlling tick infestations and the transmission of tick-borne diseases remains a challenge for the livestock industry. Because the currently available commercial vaccines offer only partial protection against R. (B.) microplus, there is a need for more efficient vaccines. Several recombinant antigens have been evaluated using different immunization strategies, and they show great promise. This work describes the construction and immunological characterization of a multi-antigen chimera composed of two R. (B.) microplus antigens (RmLTI and BmCG) and one Escherichia coli antigen (B subunit, LTB). The immunogenic regions of each antigen were selected and combined to encode a single polypeptide. The gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli. For all of the experiments, two groups (treated and control) of four Angus heifers (3-6 months old) were used. The inoculation was performed via intramuscular injection with 200 µg of purified recombinant chimeric protein and adjuvated. The chimeric protein was recognized by specific antibodies against each subunit and by sera from cattle inoculated with the chimera. Immunization of RmLTI-BmCG-LTB cattle reduced the number of adult female ticks by 6.29% and vaccination of cattle with the chimeric antigen provided 55.6% efficacy against R. (B.) microplus infestation. The results of this study indicate that the novel chimeric protein is a potential candidate for the future development of a more effective vaccine against R. (B.) microplus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191596

  6 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500125
[Au] Autor:Khan R; Ali A
[Ad] Address:Division of Hematology, Oncology and Blood & Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA. Electronic address: rafiullah@uiowa.edu.
[Ti] Title:Non-traumatic splenic rupture in a patient with human granulocytic anaplasmosis and focused review of the literature.
[So] Source:Ticks Tick Borne Dis;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1877-9603
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report a rare case of a 53-year-old man with no significant past medical history who reported multiple tick bites within a 2-month period. The patient reported not "feeling well" for the 2 ½ weeks. He complained of generalized body aches, pains, and chills. He did not report nausea, vomiting, or yellowish discoloration of the eyes or skin. He presented to the emergency room with syncope preceded by severe abdominal pain. Upon presentation, he was pale and hypotensive. He had not experienced any trauma. Computed tomography revealed a splenic rupture, hemoperitoneum, and active extravasation of contrast material. The estimated amount of hemoperitoneum was 1.5 liters of blood. Subsequently, an infectious disease work-up revealed a positive Anaplasma phagocytophilum polymerase reaction in blood. The patient was aggressively resuscitated, and a splenectomy was performed followed by doxycycline therapy. He successfully recovered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29491236
[Au] Autor:Gaowa; Wulantuya; Yin X; Cao M; Guo S; Ding C; Yuhua L; Jianchang L; Kawabata H; Ando S; Su H; Shimada M; Takamoto N; Shimamura Y; Masuda S; Ohashi N
[Ad] Address:Inner Mongolia Key Laboratory of Tick-borne Zoonotic Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, College of Hetao, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.
[Ti] Title:Human Infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Inner Mongolia, China.
[So] Source:Jpn J Infect Dis;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1884-2836
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an obligate intracellular bacterium and causes febrile illness in humans and livestock. A 49-year-old woman was suffering from feverish symptom, fatigue, arthralgia, general body pain, and anorexia for 2 weeks. Later, she visited Bayan Nur Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Hospital in Inner Mongolia, China. Molecular-based diagnostic analysis of the patient's blood revealed that A. phagocytophilum p44 DNA was positive, but Brucella omp31, spotted fever group Rickettsia gltA, Orientia tsutsugamushi 16S rDNA, and Ehrlichia p28 were negative. The amino acid sequences of 9 A. phagocytophilum p44 clones obtained from the patient shared 44-100% similarity among them and closely related to those of previously-identified p44 clones from canis familiaris (accession no. KJV64194) and from Ixodes persulcatus tick (no. BAN28309). Serological tests using the patient's serum showed that IgM and IgG titers to A. phagocytophilum antigens were 160 and 20, respectively, determined by indirect immunofluorescence assay and the reaction to recombinant P44 proteins (rP44-1, rP44-18ES, and/or rP44-47) were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Thus, the results obtained in this study strongly suggests that the patient was infected with A. phagocytophilum. To our knowledge, this is a first case of human anaplasomosis infection in Inner Mongolia autonomous region.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.7883/yoken.JJID.2017.450

  8 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29483058
[Au] Autor:Tembo S; Collins NE; Sibeko-Matjila KP; Troskie M; Vorster I; Byaruhanga C; Oosthuizen MC
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Services, Box 19, Mungwi, Zambia; Vectors and Vector-borne Diseases Research Programme, Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort 0110, South Africa.
[Ti] Title:Occurrence of tick-borne haemoparasites in cattle in the Mungwi District, Northern Province, Zambia.
[So] Source:Ticks Tick Borne Dis;, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1877-9603
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Little is known about the occurrence of haemoparasites in cattle in communal grazing areas of Mungwi District of Northern Province, Zambia. Clinical signs and post mortem lesions are pathognomonic of mixed tick-borne infections especially babesiosis, anaplasmosis and East Coast fever. The main objective of this study was to screen selected communal herds of cattle for tick-borne haemoparasites, and identify the tick vectors associated with the high cattle mortalities due to suspected tick-borne diseases in the local breeds of cattle grazing along the banks of the Chambeshi River in Mungwi District, Northern Province, Zambia. A total of 299 cattle blood samples were collected from July to September 2010 from Kapamba (n = 50), Chifulo (n = 102), Chisanga (n = 38), Kowa (n = 95) and Mungwi central (n = 14) in the Mungwi District. A total of 5288 ticks were also collected from the sampled cattle from April to July 2011. DNA was extracted from the cattle blood and the hypervariable region of the parasite small subunit rRNA gene was amplified and subjected to the reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay. The results of the RLB assay revealed the presence of tick-borne haemoparasites in 259 (86.6%) cattle blood samples occurring either as single (11.0%) or mixed (75.6%) infections. The most prevalent species present were the benign Theileria mutans (54.5%) and T. velifera (51.5%). Anaplasma marginale (25.7%), Babesia bovis (7.7%) and B. bigemina (3.3%) DNA were also detected in the samples. Only one sample (from Kapamba) tested positive for the presence of T. parva. This was an unexpected finding; also because the tick vector, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, was identified on animals from Kowa (14.0%), Chisanga (8.5%), Chifulo (6.0%) and Kapamba (1.4%). One sample (from Kapamba) tested positive for the presence of Ehrlichia ruminantium even though Amblyomma variegatum ticks were identified from 52.9% of the sampled animals from all study areas. There was significant positive association between T. mutans and T. velifera (p < 0.001) infections, and between A. marginale and B. bovis (p = 0.005). The presence of R. microplus tick vectors on cattle was significantly associated with B. bovis (odds ratio, OR = 28.4, p < 0.001) and A. marginale (OR = 42.0, p < 0.001) infections, while A. variegatum presence was significantly associated with T. mutans (OR = 213.0, p < 0.001) and T. velifera (OR = 459.0, p < 0.001) infections. Rhipicephalus decoloratus was significantly associated with B. bigemina (OR = 21.6, p = 0.004) and A. marginale (OR = 28.5, p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis showed a significant association between location and tick-borne pathogen status for A. marginale (p < 0.001), T. mutans (p = 0.004), T. velifera (p = 0.003) and T. taurotragi (p = 0.005). The results of our study suggest that the cause of cattle mortalities in Mungwi during the winter outbreaks is mainly due to A. marginale, B. bovis and B. bigemina infections. This was confirmed by the clinical manifestation of the disease in the affected cattle and the tick species identified on the animals. The relatively low prevalence of T. parva, B. bigemina, B. bovis and E. ruminantium could indicate the existence of endemic instability with a pool of susceptible cattle and the occurrence of disease outbreaks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29453420
[Au] Autor:Tokarz R; Mishra N; Tagliafierro T; Sameroff S; Caciula A; Chauhan L; Patel J; Sullivan E; Gucwa A; Fallon B; Golightly M; Molins C; Schriefer M; Marques A; Briese T; Lipkin WI
[Ad] Address:Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. rt2249@columbia.edu.
[Ti] Title:A multiplex serologic platform for diagnosis of tick-borne diseases.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):3158, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tick-borne diseases are the most common vector-borne diseases in the United States, with serology being the primary method of diagnosis. We developed the first multiplex, array-based assay for serodiagnosis of tick-borne diseases called the TBD-Serochip. The TBD-Serochip was designed to discriminate antibody responses to 8 major tick-borne pathogens present in the United States, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia miyamotoi, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Rickettsia rickettsii, Heartland virus and Powassan virus. Each assay contains approximately 170,000 12-mer linear peptides that tile along the protein sequence of the major antigens from each agent with 11 amino acid overlap. This permits accurate identification of a wide range of specific immunodominant IgG and IgM epitopes that can then be used to enhance diagnostic accuracy and integrate differential diagnosis into a single assay. To test the performance of the TBD-Serochip, we examined sera from patients with confirmed Lyme disease, babesiosis, anaplasmosis, and Powassan virus disease. We identified a wide range of specific discriminatory epitopes that facilitated accurate diagnosis of each disease. We also identified previously undiagnosed infections. Our results indicate that the TBD-Serochip is a promising tool for a differential diagnosis not available with currently employed serologic assays for TBDs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-21349-2

  10 / 2026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29306724
[Au] Autor:Saleem S; Ijaz M; Farooqi SH; Rashid MI; Khan A; Masud A; Aqib AI; Hussain K; Mehmood K; Zhang H
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, 54600 Lahore, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:First molecular evidence of equine granulocytic anaplasmosis in Pakistan.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;180:18-25, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Anaplasma phagocytophilum (A. phagocytophilum) is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes equine granulocytic anaplasmosis (EGA) disease in equines. This pathogen has zoonotic potential, which makes it very important to be detected and controlled as early as possible. This study was aimed to assess the molecular prevalence, associated risk factors of EGA along with its effects on various hematological parameters. This study revealed an overall 10.67% prevalence in equine. Horses showed highest prevalence followed by mules and donkeys presenting 11.86, 10.53 and 9.43% prevalence, respectively. The samples were confirmed for anaplasmosis through sequencing. The BLAST queries confirmed very high homology of our isolates with Chinese and Japanese isolates of A. phagocytophilum (Accession no's; KX505303, KY242456 and LC002836). The phylogenetic analysis found the study isolates clustered with each other and this cluster closely resembled Chinese isolate of A. bovis (FJ169957), A. phagocytophilum (HQ872464) and A. phagocytophilum (NR_044762) human isolate from northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. The key risk factors identified for occurrence of EGA in equine species on the basis of univariable analysis were sex of animal, housing type, tick infestation, previous tick history and tick control status, type of acaricides used, rearing system and farm hygiene, respectively. The hematological parameters like Hemoglobin (Hb), Total Leukocyte Count (TLC), Total Erythrocytes Count (TEC), and granulocytes were decreased in diseased animals. The mules showed no typical hematological variations which make sense for its nature as carrier of infection to the susceptible species. This is the first molecular evidence of EGA in Pakistan. The disease needs to be handled seriously as it has zoonotic potential. The animals should be properly attended in disease conditions as leukopenia, neutropenia and lymphopenia can aggravate the condition by making the animal prone to secondary infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:In-Process


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