Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Anesthetics [Words]
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[PMID]: 29098494
[Au] Autor:Manatpon P; Kofke WA
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. Panumart.Manatpon@uphs.upenn.edu.
[Ti] Title:Toxicity of inhaled agents after prolonged administration.
[So] Source:J Clin Monit Comput;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2614
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inhaled anesthetics have been utilized mostly for general anesthesia in the operating room and oftentimes for sedation and for treatment of refractory status epilepticus and status asthmaticus in the intensive care unit. These contexts in the ICU setting are related to potential for prolonged administration wherein potential organ toxicity is a concern. Over the last decade, several clinical and animal studies of neurotoxicity attributable to inhaled anesthetics have been emerging, particularly in extremes of age. This review overviews potential for and potential mechanisms of neurotoxicity and systemic toxicity of prolonged inhaled anesthesia and clinical scenarios where inhaled anesthesia has been used in order to assess safety of possible prolonged use for sedation. High dose inhaled agents are associated with postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) and other situations. However, thus far no strong indication of problematic neuro or organ toxicity has been demonstrated after prolonged use of low dose volatile anesthesia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10877-017-0077-0

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[PMID]: 29095263
[Au] Autor:Zhang W; Wu H
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Anesthesiology bDepartment of Obstetrics, Affiliated Women and Children's Hospital of Jiaxing University, Jiaxing, China.
[Ti] Title:ED50 of intrathecal ropivacaine for cesarean section under prophylactic infusion of phenylephrine: A consort study.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(44):e8319, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Studies have reported that prophylactic continuous infusion of phenylephrine during spinal anesthesia for cesarean section can decrease the spread of local anesthetics. We investigated the ED50 of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine in parturient women undergoing cesarean section under prophylactic infusion of phenylephrine. METHODS: Sixty parturient women were allocated into 2 groups in this prospective study. Group P received 0.5 mL kg h of phenylephrine (5 mg/50 mL) at the start of intrathecal injection, and Group C (control group) received the same volume of saline. The dose of intrathecal ropivacaine for each subject was decided through up-down allocation method. The initial dose was set as 7.5 mg. Successful anesthesia was defined as the level of T6 or above achieved within 15 minutes after intrathecal injection and no additional epidural drug or venous analgesia to complete operation. The Massey formula was applied to calculate the ED50 of intrathecal ropivacaine in both groups. RESULTS: The ED50 of hyperbaric ropivacaine determined by up-and-down method was 7.2 mg (95% confidence interval (CI), 6.8-7.6 mg) in the Group P, and 6.8 mg (95% CI, 6.4-7.2 mg) in the Group C, there was significant difference between the 2 groups (P < .5). The ED50 of intrathecal ropivacaine increases compared with Group C when phenylephrine is prophylactic infused to prevent spinal induced hypotension in cesarean section. CONCLUSION: The ED50 of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine is 7.2 mg when phenylephrine is prophylactic infused to prevent spinal induced hypotension in cesarean section, and more ropivacaine demands on spinal anesthesia for cesarean section (www.chictr.org.cn, registration number: ChiCTR-RIC-17011650).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008319

  3 / 73731 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29095194
[Au] Autor:Kalaria SS; Boukovalas S; Padilla PL; Tran JP; Li RT; Phillips LG
[Ad] Address:From the *Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, and School of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX.
[Ti] Title:Liposomal Bupivacaine May Benefit Select Reduction Mammaplasty Patients.
[So] Source:Ann Plast Surg;, 2017 Oct 31.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3708
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Postoperative pain control can be challenging in reduction mammaplasty patients. This study compares perioperative liposomal bupivacaine (Exparel; Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc, San Diego, Calif) with standard local anesthetics to determine if liposomal bupivacaine decreases opioid and antiemetic use, impacting length of stay and complication rates, thus improving patient outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective review of 170 reduction mammaplasty patients was performed. Patients were divided into groups based on local anesthetic used (bupivacaine only and liposomal bupivacaine) and into subgroups based on obesity classification. Length of hospital stay; pain scores immediately postoperatively, at discharge, and at follow-up; and postoperative analgesics and antiemetics were compared. Further analysis was performed after weight stratification within pre- and postmenopausal categories. RESULTS: Liposomal bupivacaine resulted in less pain than bupivacaine immediately postoperatively and at discharge in obesity class I (P = 0.021 and P = 0.018). In obesity class II, antiemetic use was lower in the liposomal bupivacaine group (P = 0.012). Length of stay was persistently lower with liposomal bupivacaine for premenopausal women, and this difference was significant in obesity class I (P = 0.038). In premenopausal women, discharge pain scores were lower in the overweight liposomal bupivacaine group (P = 0.034) and analgesic use was lower in obesity class III (P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Liposomal bupivacaine decreases postoperative pain, opioid, and antiemetic use in select patients. Liposomal bupivacaine might not be equally efficacious in pain reduction in obese or postmenopausal women given the theoretical increased absorption by adipose tissue. In addition, liposomal bupivacaine may have a dose-dependent effect, and weight-based dosing should be investigated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SAP.0000000000001232

  4 / 73731 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29094418
[Au] Autor:Schaefer MS; Kranke P; Weibel S; Kreysing R; Ochel J; Kienbaum P
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Total intravenous anesthesia vs single pharmacological prophylaxis to prevent postoperative vomiting in children: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Paediatr Anaesth;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1460-9592
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Postoperative nausea and postoperative vomiting are frequent but often missed complications after general anesthesia in pediatric patients. Because inhaled anesthetics are known to trigger postoperative vomiting, total intravenous anesthesia is often administered in high-risk children to avoid the use of inhalational anesthesia. Since inhalational anesthesia might be advantageous in some situations, the question is raised whether administration of pharmacological prophylaxis offers equal protection from postoperative vomiting compared with total intravenous anesthesia alone. AIM: The aim of this systematic review was to compare total intravenous anesthesia with single-drug pharmacological prophylaxis for the protection of postoperative vomiting in pediatric patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review (EMBASE, MEDLINE, and CENTRAL) with meta-analysis on randomized controlled trials including patients <18 years of age undergoing general anesthesia, with one group receiving propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia and another group receiving inhalational anesthesia with single pharmacological prophylaxis. Primary outcome was the overall incidence for postoperative vomiting. Secondary outcomes included early and late postoperative vomiting, the need for postoperative antiemetic medication, time to first oral intake, duration of stay in the postanesthesia care unit, and any adverse events defined as such by the respective authors. Risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using a random effects model with inverse variance weighting. RESULTS: Four randomized controlled trials including 558 children were included in the final analysis. All patients underwent strabismus surgery. Total intravenous anesthesia and single pharmacological prophylaxis were equally effective in preventing overall postoperative vomiting (RR 0.99 [95% CI 0.77; 1.27]; 4 trials), as well as vomiting in the early (1.48 [0.78; 2.83]; 4 trials) and late (0.89 [0.56;1.42]; 2 trials) postoperative period. There was no difference in the need for postoperative antiemetic medication. Although patients resumed drinking and eating significantly earlier following total intravenous anesthesia (MD -1.40 hours [-2.01; -0.80], P < .001), the duration of PACU stay did not differ between groups. The incidence of intraoperative oculocardiac reflex was the only reported adverse event, which was more likely to occur after total intravenous anesthesia (1.86 [1.01; 3.41]). CONCLUSION: Single pharmacological prophylaxis appears equally effective compared with total intravenous anesthesia in preventing postoperative vomiting in pediatric patients. However, during strabismus surgery, total intravenous anesthesia increases the risk for bradycardia due to oculocardiac reflex. Thus, when anesthesia is maintained with inhalational anesthetics, its emetogenic effects can sufficiently be compensated by the addition of a single prophylactic antiemetic medication.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pan.13268

  5 / 73731 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29069016
[Au] Autor:Wang X; Wu X; Liu K; Xia L; Lin X; Liu W; Gao Z
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai 9th People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine bShanghai Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Topical cryoanesthesia for the relief of pain caused by steroid injections used to treat hypertrophic scars and keloids.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(43):e8353, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Intralesional steroid injections are the standard treatment for hypertrophic scars and keloids. The procedure is, however, quite painful and is unpopular with patients because of this. Topical application of anesthetic creams, such as Ametop gel (tetracaine) and EMLA cream (lidocaine and prilocaine), has limited efficacy because of poor drug penetration. The onset of the analgesic effect is also slow, which means that the use of topical anesthetics is time-consuming in clinical practice.We hypothesized that a commercially available cryotip could be used to provide fast-acting topical cryoanesthesia that would reduce the pain associated with steroid injections.Thirty patients with hypertrophic scars or keloids were enrolled in the study. Scars were injected with the steroid, triamcinolone acetonide, with or without prior application of the cryotip (-10 C) for 15 seconds. The degree of pain was evaluated in each case using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the verbal descriptor scale (VDS), together with any side-effects caused by application of the cryotip.The VAS pain scores showed a statistically significant (P < .01) difference between the pretreated and the control scars (pain scores 7.87  1.31 and 2.7  1.37, respectively). The VDS pain scores also showed a statistically significant (P < .01) difference between the pretreated and the control scars. And its average scores were 7.89  0.32 and 2.68  0.25, respectively.Application of the cryotip before injection could provide a rapid and effective means of reducing the pain associated with steroid injections. Painless would result in better therapeutic effect.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anesthetics, Local/administration & dosage
Cryoanesthesia/instrumentation
Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage
Pain/drug therapy
Triamcinolone Acetonide/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Cicatrix, Hypertrophic/drug therapy
Cryoanesthesia/methods
Female
Humans
Injections, Intralesional/adverse effects
Injections, Intralesional/methods
Keloid/drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pain/etiology
Pain Measurement
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anesthetics, Local); 0 (Glucocorticoids); F446C597KA (Triamcinolone Acetonide)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171025
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008353

  6 / 73731 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28935596
[Au] Autor:Harloff-Helleberg S; Nielsen LH; Nielsen HM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen , Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Animal models for evaluation of oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals.
[So] Source:J Control Release;268:57-71, 2017 Sep 19.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4995
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biopharmaceuticals are increasingly important for patients and the pharmaceutical industry due to their ability to treat and, in some cases, even cure chronic and potentially life-threatening diseases. Most biopharmaceuticals are administered by injection, but intensive focus on development of systems for oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals may result in new treatment modalities to increase the patient compliance and reduce product cost. In the preclinical development phase, use of experimental animal models is essential for evaluation of new formulation designs. In general, the limited oral bioavailability of biopharmaceuticals, of just a few percent, is expected, and therefore, the animal models and the experimental settings must be chosen with utmost care. More knowledge and focus on this topic is highly needed, despite experience from the numerous studies evaluating animal models for oral drug delivery of small molecule drugs. This review highlights and discusses pros and cons of the most currently used animal models and settings. Additionally, it also looks into the influence of anesthetics and sampling methods for evaluation of drug delivery systems for oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals primarily with examples on insulin.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 73731 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28881034
[Au] Autor:Lv X; Yan J; Jiang J; Zhou X; Lu Y; Jiang H
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:MicroRNA-27a-3p suppression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ contributes to cognitive impairments resulting from sevoflurane treatment.
[So] Source:J Neurochem;143(3):306-319, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1471-4159
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sevoflurane is the most widely used anaesthetic administered by inhalation. Exposure to sevoflurane in neonatal mice can induce learning deficits and abnormal social behaviours. MicroRNA (miR)-27a-3p, a short, non-coding RNA that functions as a tumour suppressor, is up-regulated after inhalation of anaesthetic, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) is one of its target genes. The objective of this study was to investigate how the miR-27a-3p-PPAR-γ interaction affects sevoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. A luciferase reporter assay was employed to identify the interaction between miR-27a-3p and PPAR-γ. Primary hippocampal neuron cultures prepared from embryonic day 0 C57BL/6 mice were treated with miR-27a-3p inhibitor or a PPAR-γ agonist to determine the effect of miR-27a-3p and PPAR-γ on sevoflurane-induced cellular damage. Cellular damage was assessed by a flow cytometry assay to detect apoptotic cells, immunofluorescence to detect reactive oxygen species, western blotting to detect NADPH oxidase 1/4 and ELISA to measure inflammatory cytokine levels. In vivo experiments were performed using a sevoflurane-induced anaesthetic mouse model to analyse the effects of miR-27a-3p on neurotoxicity by measuring the number of apoptotic neurons using the Terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl Transferase Mediated Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) method and learning and memory function by employing the Morris water maze test. Our results revealed that PPAR-γ expression was down-regulated by miR-27a-3p following sevoflurane treatment in hippocampal neurons. Down-regulation of miR-27a-3p expression decreased sevoflurane-induced hippocampal neuron apoptosis by decreasing inflammation and oxidative stress-related protein expression through the up-regulation of PPAR-γ. In vivo tests further confirmed that inhibition of miR-27a-3p expression attenuated sevoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis and learning and memory impairment. Our findings suggest that down-regulation of miR-27a-3p expression ameliorated sevoflurane-induced neurotoxicity and learning and memory impairment through the PPAR-γ signalling pathway. MicroRNA-27a-3p may, therefore, be a potential therapeutic target for preventing or treating sevoflurane-induced neurotoxicity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anesthetics, Inhalation/toxicity
Cognition Disorders/chemically induced
Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects
Methyl Ethers/toxicity
MicroRNAs/metabolism
PPAR gamma/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Newborn
Apoptosis/drug effects
Apoptosis/genetics
Cells, Cultured
Disease Models, Animal
Gene Expression Regulation/genetics
Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein/metabolism
Hippocampus/cytology
Maze Learning/physiology
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
MicroRNAs/genetics
Neurons/drug effects
Neurons/metabolism
PPAR gamma/genetics
RNA, Small Interfering/pharmacology
Reaction Time/drug effects
Reaction Time/genetics
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
Tubulin/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anesthetics, Inhalation); 0 (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein); 0 (Methyl Ethers); 0 (MicroRNAs); 0 (Mirn27 microRNA, mouse); 0 (PPAR gamma); 0 (RNA, Small Interfering); 0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); 0 (Tubulin); 0 (beta3 tubulin, mouse); 38LVP0K73A (sevoflurane)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170907
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/jnc.14208

  8 / 73731 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28808114
[Au] Autor:Ho AM; Fleming ML; Mizubuti GB
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
[Ti] Title:Anesthetic neurotoxicity and the developing brain.
[So] Source:CMAJ;189(32):E1028-E1029, 2017 08 14.
[Is] ISSN:1488-2329
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anesthetics/adverse effects
Brain/drug effects
Brain/embryology
Neurotoxicity Syndromes/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Humans
Neurons/drug effects
Neurotoxicity Syndromes/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anesthetics)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170815
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1503/cmaj.170313

  9 / 73731 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28598907
[Au] Autor:Sinha S; Schreiner AJ; Biernaskie J; Nickerson D; Gabriel VA
[Ad] Address:From the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Departments of Clinical Neurosciences, Pediatrics and Surgery, Faculty of Medicine (S.S., V.A.G.) Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (S.S., J.B.), Faculty of Medicine (A.J.S., V.A.G.), University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Calgary Firefighters' Burn Treatment Centre (D.N., V.A.G.); and Section of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery (D.N.), University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Treating pain on skin graft donor sites: Review and clinical recommendations.
[So] Source:J Trauma Acute Care Surg;83(5):954-964, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:2163-0763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Split-thickness skin grafting is the most common reconstructive procedure in managing burn injuries. Harvesting split-thickness skin creates a new partial thickness wound referred to as the donor site. Pain at the donor site is reported to be one of the most distressing symptoms during the early postoperative period. Here, we (a) identify strategies for managing donor site pain, (b) assess the quality of individual studies, and (c) formulate evidence-based recommendations based on the amount and consistency of evidence. Our analysis revealed five distinct approaches to minimize donor site pain. These include: continuous subcutaneous local anesthetic infusion (three studies), subcutaneous anesthetic injection (five studies), topical agents (six studies), nonpharmacological interventions (three studies), and wound dressings (18 studies). Available randomized control trials typically evaluated pain on standardized scales (i.e. Visual Analog Scale, Numerical Rating Scale), and compared the experimental group with standard care. Recommended treatments include: (a) subcutaneous anesthetic injection of adrenaline-lidocaine; (b) ice application; (c) topical agents, such as lidocaine and bupivacaine; and (d) hydrocolloid- and polyurethane-based wound dressings accompanied with fibrin sealant. Methodologically sound randomized control trials examining the efficacy of modified tumescent solution, ropivacaine, plasma therapy, noncontact ultrasound, and morphine gels are lacking and should be a priority for future research.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anesthetics, Local/therapeutic use
Bandages
Cryotherapy
Pain Management
Skin Transplantation/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Autografts
Burns/surgery
Humans
Infusions, Intralesional
Injections, Intralesional
Pain/etiology
Postoperative Complications/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anesthetics, Local)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170609
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000001615

  10 / 73731 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28545733
[Au] Autor:Dong H; Zhang FJ; Wang FY; Wang YY; Guo J; Kanhar GM; Chen J; Liu J; Zhou C; Yan M; Chen X
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education of China, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
[Ti] Title:Simultaneous on-line monitoring of propofol and sevoflurane in balanced anesthesia by direct resistive heating gas chromatography.
[So] Source:J Chromatogr A;1506:93-100, 2017 Jul 14.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3778
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In balanced anesthesia, sevoflurane and propofol are often used in combination to achieve a better anesthetic effect. However, methods for on-line monitoring of concentrations of the two anesthetics in patients are still rare in clinical. This study proposed a non-invasive method utilizing a fast gas chromatograph combined with a surface acoustic wave sensor (Fast GC-SAW) to simultaneously on-line monitor sevoflurane and propofol in patients' exhaled gas. By using the direct resistive heating capillary column, the single detection time of Fast GC-SAW system was significantly shortened to 90s, as well as the size reduced to (40cm30cm20cm). Besides, in the calibration of sevoflurane, Fast GC-SAW system showed a good linear correlation (R =0.9925, P<0.01) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), which ensured the reliability and accuracy of the Fast GC-SAW system. Finally, clinical experiments on patients under balanced anesthesia were conducted. The varied concentrations measured by Fast GC-SAW extraordinarily matched the clinical usages of these two anesthetics.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anesthetics, Inhalation/analysis
Automation/methods
Chromatography, Gas/methods
Methyl Ethers/analysis
Propofol/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anesthetics, Inhalation/administration & dosage
Balanced Anesthesia
Chromatography, Gas/instrumentation
Female
Humans
Male
Propofol/administration & dosage
Reproducibility of Results
[Pt] Publication type:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anesthetics, Inhalation); 0 (Methyl Ethers); 38LVP0K73A (sevoflurane); YI7VU623SF (Propofol)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170526
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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