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[PMID]: 29497757
[Au] Autor:Galletta EE; Goral M
[Ad] Address:Department of Speech-Language Pathology, New York University Langone Health, New York.
[Ti] Title:Response Time Inconsistencies in Object and Action Naming in Anomic Aphasia.
[So] Source:Am J Speech Lang Pathol;27(1S):477-484, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1558-9110
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: The effect of repeated naming on both object and action picture naming in individuals with anomic aphasia is explored. We asked whether repeatedly naming the same items leads to improved accuracy and reduced response latency. Method: Ten individuals with anomic aphasia and 6 healthy adults, 3 young and 3 old, named a set of 27 object pictures and a set of 27 action pictures presented 1 at a time on a computer screen. We examined accuracy and response times (RTs) across the 2 blocks of 10 repeated trials. Results: Results demonstrated higher accuracy and faster RTs for object than for action naming for all participants, with lower accuracy rates and slower RTs for the people with aphasia (PWA) compared with the healthy individuals, and diverging patterns of change across trials. Unlike the healthy participants, whose RTs decreased across trials, PWA continued to demonstrate variability in response latencies across the trials. Conclusions: Our preliminary results suggest that measuring RT may be useful in characterizing retrieval difficulty in anomic aphasia and that the retrieval processes in PWA, even in those who experience mild anomia, may be less efficient or different from those processes in neurologically healthy individuals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0168

  2 / 1735 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29497750
[Au] Autor:Minkina I; Martin N; Spencer KA; Kendall DL
[Ad] Address:Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA.
[Ti] Title:Links Between Short-Term Memory and Word Retrieval in Aphasia.
[So] Source:Am J Speech Lang Pathol;27(1S):379-391, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1558-9110
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: This study explored the relationship between anomia and verbal short-term memory (STM) in the context of an interactive activation language processing model. Method: Twenty-four individuals with aphasia and reduced STM spans (i.e., impaired immediate serial recall of words) completed a picture-naming task and a word pair repetition task (a measure of verbal STM). Correlations between verbal STM and word retrieval errors made on the picture-naming task were examined. Results: A significant positive correlation between naming accuracy and verbal span length was found. More intricate verbal STM analyses examined the relationship between picture-naming error types (i.e., semantic vs. phonological) and 2 measures of verbal STM: (a) location of errors on the word pair repetition task and (b) imageability and frequency effects on the word pair repetition task. Results indicated that, as phonological word retrieval errors (relative to semantic) increase, bias toward correct repetition of high-imageability words increases. Conclusions: Results suggest that word retrieval and verbal STM tasks likely rely on a partially shared temporary linguistic activation process.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1044/2017_AJSLP-16-0194

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[PMID]: 29486491
[Au] Autor:Silkes JP
[Ad] Address:Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle.
[Ti] Title:Masked Repetition Priming Treatment for Anomia.
[So] Source:J Speech Lang Hear Res;:1-23, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1558-9102
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: Masked priming has been suggested as a way to directly target implicit lexical retrieval processes in aphasia. This study was designed to investigate repeated use of masked repetition priming to improve picture naming in individuals with anomia due to aphasia. Method: A single-subject, multiple-baseline design was used across 6 people with aphasia. Training involved repeated exposure to pictures that were paired with masked identity primes or sham primes. Two semantic categories were trained in series for each participant. Analyses assessed treatment effects, generalization within and across semantic categories, and effects on broader language skills, immediately and 3 months after treatment. Results: Four of the 6 participants improved in naming trained items immediately after treatment. Improvements were generally greater for items that were presented in training with masked identity primes than items that were presented repeatedly during training with masked sham primes. Generalization within and across semantic categories was limited. Generalization to broader language skills was inconsistent. Conclusion: Masked repetition priming may improve naming for some individuals with anomia due to aphasia. A number of methodological and theoretical insights into further development of this treatment approach are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0192

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[PMID]: 29477839
[Au] Autor:Gajardo-Vidal A; Lorca-Puls DL; Crinion JT; White J; Seghier ML; Leff AP; Hope TMH; Ludersdorfer P; Green DW; Bowman H; Price CJ
[Ad] Address:Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom; Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad del Desarrollo, Concepcion 4070001, Chile. Electronic address: andrea.gajardo.11@uc
[Ti] Title:How distributed processing produces false negatives in voxel-based lesion-deficit analyses.
[So] Source:Neuropsychologia;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3514
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this study, we hypothesized that if the same deficit can be caused by damage to one or another part of a distributed neural system, then voxel-based analyses might miss critical lesion sites because preservation of each site will not be consistently associated with preserved function. The first part of our investigation used voxel-based multiple regression analyses of data from 359 right-handed stroke survivors to identify brain regions where lesion load is associated with picture naming abilities after factoring out variance related to object recognition, semantics and speech articulation so as to focus on deficits arising at the word retrieval level. A highly significant lesion-deficit relationship was identified in left temporal and frontal/premotor regions. Post-hoc analyses showed that damage to either of these sites caused the deficit of interest in less than half the affected patients (76/162 = 47%). After excluding all patients with damage to one or both of the identified regions, our second analysis revealed a new region, in the anterior part of the left putamen, which had not been previously detected because many patients had the deficit of interest after temporal or frontal damage that preserved the left putamen. The results illustrate how (i) false negative results arise when the same deficit can be caused by different lesion sites; (ii) some of the missed effects can be unveiled by adopting an iterative approach that systematically excludes patients with lesions to the areas identified in previous analyses, (iii) statistically significant voxel-based lesion-deficit mappings can be driven by a subset of patients; (iv) focal lesions to the identified regions are needed to determine whether the deficit of interest is the consequence of focal damage or much more extensive damage that includes the identified region; and, finally, (v) univariate voxel-based lesion-deficit mappings cannot, in isolation, be used to predict outcome in other patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1735 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29246487
[Au] Autor:Kurland J; Liu A; Stokes P
[Ad] Address:University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Communication Disorders, United States. Electronic address: jkurland@comdis.umass.edu.
[Ti] Title:Practice effects in healthy older adults: Implications for treatment-induced neuroplasticity in Aphasia.
[So] Source:Neuropsychologia;109:116-125, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3514
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In treating aphasic individuals with anomia, practice naming pictures leads to better performance as measured by accuracy and reaction time. The neurocognitive mechanisms supporting such improvements remain elusive, in part due to gaps in understanding the influence of practice on neurotypical older adults. The current study investigated the influence of practice naming one set of low frequency pictures of actions and objects in 18 healthy older adults, ten of whom were tested twice approximately one month apart. Both item and task practice effects were observed in improved accuracy and response latencies naming pictures in the scanner. This same facilitation effect was observed in neuroimaging results. For example, a significant main effect of practice was observed in bilateral precuneus and left inferior parietal lobule, characterized by greater activity for naming practiced vs. unpracticed pictures. This difference was significantly diminished in subsequent runs after exposure to unpracticed pictures. Whole brain analyses across two sessions showed that practice effects were specific to practice, i.e., there were not similar observable changes in contrasts examining actions vs. objects over time. These findings have important implications for understanding treatment-induced neuroplasticity in anomia treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 1735 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29380657
[Au] Autor:Meyer AM; Tippett DC; Turner RS; Friedman RB
[Ad] Address:a Center for Aphasia Research and Rehabilitation , Georgetown University Medical Center , Washington , DC , USA.
[Ti] Title:Long-Term maintenance of anomia treatment effects in primary progressive aphasia.
[So] Source:Neuropsychol Rehabil;:1-25, 2018 Jan 30.
[Is] ISSN:1464-0694
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study examined the maintenance of anomia treatment effects in primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Following baseline testing, a phonological treatment and an orthographic treatment were administered over the course of six months. The treatment stimuli consisted of nouns that were consistently named correctly at baseline (Prophylaxis items) and/or nouns that were consistently named incorrectly at baseline (Remediation items). Naming accuracy was measured at baseline, and it was measured at 1 month, 8 months, and 15 months post-treatment. The change in naming accuracy from baseline to each post-treatment evaluation was calculated within each treatment condition, and within a matched untrained condition. The change in naming accuracy was then compared between the three conditions. The results of these analyses indicate that phonological and orthographic treatments are both effective in the Prophylaxis and Remediation of anomia in all three variants of PPA. For Prophylaxis items, some of the effects of each treatment can persist for as long as 15 months post-treatment. These long-term treatment effects were more robust in the orthographic treatment condition and for participants with the semantic variant of PPA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/09602011.2018.1425146

  7 / 1735 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29289335
[Au] Autor:Woollams AM; Patterson K
[Ad] Address:Neuroscience and Aphasia Research Unit, School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. Electronic address: anna.woollams@manchester.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:Cognitive consequences of the left-right asymmetry of atrophy in semantic dementia.
[So] Source:Cortex;, 2017 Dec 05.
[Is] ISSN:1973-8102
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Semantic dementia (SD) is a condition in which atrophy to the anterior temporal lobes (ATL) produces a selective deterioration of conceptual knowledge. As this atrophy is always bilateral but usually asymmetrical, differences in performance of the two SD subgroups-with left > right (L > R) versus right > left (R > L) atrophy-constitute a major source of evidence regarding the roles of the left and right sides of this region. We explored this issue using large scale case-series methodology, with a pool of 216 observations of neuropsychological data from 72 patients with SD. Anomia was significantly more severe in the L > R subgroup, even when cases from the two subgroups were matched on severity of comprehension deficits. For subgroups matched on the degree of anomia, we show that asymmetry of atrophy also affected both the nature of the naming errors produced, and the degree of a semantic category effect (living things vs artefacts). A comparison across tasks varying in their loading on verbal and visual processing revealed a greater deficit in object naming for L > R cases and in a picture-based semantic association test for R > L cases; this held true whether severity across subgroups was controlled using pairwise matching or statistically via principal components analysis. Importantly, the size of our sample allowed us to demonstrate considerable individual variation within each of the L > R and R > L subgroups, with consequent overlap between them. Our results paint a clear picture of how asymmetry of atrophy affects cognitive performance in SD, and we discuss the results in terms of two mechanisms that could contribute to these differences: variation in the information involved in semantic representations in the left and right ATL, and preferential connectivity between each ATL and other more modality specific intra-hemispheric regions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 171231
[Lr] Last revision date:171231
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 1735 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29128469
[Au] Autor:Trebuchon A; Lambert I; Guisiano B; McGonigal A; Perot C; Bonini F; Carron R; Liegeois-Chauvel C; Chauvel P; Bartolomei F
[Ad] Address:Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, INS, Inst Neurosci Syst, Marseille, France; APHM, Hôpital de la Timone, Service de Neurophysiologie Clinique, Marseille, France. Electronic address: agnes.trebuchon@univ-amu.fr.
[Ti] Title:The different patterns of seizure-induced aphasia in temporal lobe epilepsies.
[So] Source:Epilepsy Behav;, 2017 Nov 08.
[Is] ISSN:1525-5069
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Ictal language disturbances may occur in dominant hemisphere temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but little is known about the precise anatomoelectroclinical correlations. This study investigated the different facets of ictal aphasia in intracerebrally recorded TLE. METHODS: Video-stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) recordings of 37 seizures in 17 right-handed patients with drug-resistant TLE were analyzed; SEEG electroclinical correlations between language disturbance and involvement of temporal lobe structures were assessed. In the clinical analysis, we separated speech disturbance from loss of consciousness. RESULTS: According to the region involved, different patterns of ictal aphasia in TLE were identified. Impaired speech comprehension was associated with posterior lateral involvement, anomia and reduced verbal fluency with anterior mediobasal structures, and jargonaphasia with basal temporal involvement. The language production deficits, such as anomia and low fluency, cannot be simply explained by an involvement of Broca's area, since this region was not affected by seizure discharge. SIGNIFICANCE: Assessment of language function in the early ictal state can be successfully performed and provides valuable information on seizure localization within the temporal lobe as well as potentially useful information for guiding surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171112
[Lr] Last revision date:171112
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 1735 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29088349
[Au] Autor:Thompson HE; Woollams AM
[Ad] Address:School of Psychology, University of Surrey, UK.
[Ti] Title:Reduced neural 'effort' after naming treatment in anomia.
[So] Source:Brain;140(11):2773-2775, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2156
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/brain/awx264

  10 / 1735 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29067331
[Au] Autor:Roncero C; Kniefel H; Service E; Thiel A; Probst S; Chertkow H
[Ad] Address:Bloomfield Centre for Research in Aging, Lady Davis Institute of Research, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Inferior parietal transcranial direct current stimulation with training improves cognition in anomic Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia.
[So] Source:Alzheimers Dement (N Y);3(2):247-253, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2352-8737
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: We evaluated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can improve picture-naming abilities in subjects with anomic Alzheimer or frontotemporal dementias. METHODS: Using a double-blind crossover design, 10 participants were trained on picture naming over a series of 10 sessions with either 30 minutes of anodal (2 mA) tDCS stimulation to the left inferior parieto-temporal region (P3) or sham stimulation. We evaluated performance on a trained picture-naming list, an equivalent untrained list, and additional neuropsychological tasks. RESULTS: Participants improved significantly more receiving real stimulation rather than sham stimulation (40% vs. 19%,  < .01), lasting at least 2 weeks after stimulation. Furthermore, these participants showed a small increase for untrained picture-naming items and digit span when they received real stimulation but a decrease when sham stimulation was received. DISCUSSION: tDCS stimulation has promise as a treatment for anomia in demented individuals and the effect can generalize to unstudied items as well as other cognitive abilities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171029
[Lr] Last revision date:171029
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.trci.2017.03.003


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