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[PMID]: 29181866
[Au] Autor:Petrussa E; Boscutti F; Vianello A; Casolo V
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Plant Biology, Department of Agricultural, Food, Animal and Environmental Sciences, University of Udine, Udine, Italy.
[Ti] Title:'Last In-First Out': seasonal variations of non-structural carbohydrates, glucose-6-phosphate and ATP in tubers of two Arum species.
[So] Source:Plant Biol (Stuttg);, 2017 Nov 27.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8677
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Knowledge on the metabolism of polysaccharide reserves in wild species is still scarce. In natural sites we collected tubers of Arum italicum Mill. and A. maculatum L. - two geophytes with different apparent phenological timing, ecology and chorology - during five stages of the annual cycle in order to understand patterns of reserve accumulation and degradation. Both the entire tuber and its proximal and distal to shoot portion were utilised. Pools of non-structural carbohydrates (glucose, sucrose and starch), glucose-6-phosphate and ATP were analysed as important markers of carbohydrate metabolism. In both species, starch and glucose content of the whole tuber significantly increased from sprouting to the maturation/senescence stages, whereas sucrose showed an opposite trend; ATP and glucose-6-phosphate were almost stable and dropped only at the end of the annual cycle. Considering the two different portions of the tuber, both ATP and glucose-6-phosphate concentrations were higher in proximity to the shoot in all seasonal stages, except the flowering stage. Our findings suggest that seasonal carbon partitioning in the underground organ is driven by phenology and occurs independently of seasonal climate conditions. Moreover, our results show that starch degradation, sustained by elevated ATP and glucose-6-phosphate pools, starts in the peripheral, proximal-to-shoot portion of the tuber, consuming starch accumulated in the previous season, as a 'Last In-First Out' mechanism of carbohydrate storage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171230
[Lr] Last revision date:171230
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/plb.12673

  2 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27840488
[Au] Autor:Zakerin S; Fahimi S; Rezghi M
[Ad] Address:Traditional Medicine and Materia Medica Research Center and Department of Traditional Pharmacy, School of Traditional Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Anti-Freckles Herbal Treatment in Iranian Traditional Medicine.
[So] Source:Iran J Med Sci;41(3 Suppl):S22, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:0253-0716
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Freckles are numerous pigmented spots of the skin, mainly confined to the face, even arms and back. Although freckles are light-brown macules, most frequently observed in individuals with red or blond hair, they are common to Asian people too. Freckles increase in number, size, and depth of pigmentation during the summer months. Histologically, freckles show increased production of melanin pigment by a normal number of melanocytes. Freckles commonly stop spreading before adolescence and last for life, but could sometimes be subtle in adulthood. Treatments are often requested for cosmetic purposes. Before the advent of lasers, treatment modalities for pigmentary disorders included surgical excision, dermabrasion, chemical bleaching, and peeling. These treatments may lead to unwanted side effects of potential scarring or undesired pigmentation changes. In Iranian traditional medicine (ITM), freckles have been known as well. "Namash" was the term used by ITM scholars to indicate freckles. There is a wide range of plants, which were prescribed by Iranian physicians for the treatment of freckles. The purpose of this study is to find the most frequent useful herbs for freckles as mentioned in ITM references. METHODS: Seven ITM references were studied for anti-freckles medicines. The references were Canon of Medicine (Avicenna), Alhavi (Razes) Tuhfat ul-Momineen (Momen tonekaboni), Makhzan-ul-Adwiah (Aghili), Ikhtiyarat Badi'i (Ansari), Al-abnia An-Haghyegh el-advia (Heravi), and al-jami li-mufradat al-adwiyawa al-aghdhiya (Ibn al-Baitar). Moreover, plants were ordered according to their repetition in the references. Afterwards, traditional names of the selected plants were matched with the scientific names using botanical text references. RESULTS: This study demonstrated that Myristica fragrans Houtt, Cicer arietema L., Eruca sativa Lam., Lilium candidium L., Amygdalus communis L., Arum italicum L. were the most frequent herbs mentioned in ITM references for the treatment of freckles. CONCLUSION: Herbs mentioned in this article could be appropriate candidates for future studies in the field of freckles treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1611
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  3 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27516655
[Au] Autor:Zakerin S; Fahimi S; Rezghi M
[Ad] Address:Traditional Medicine and Materia Medica Research Center and Department of Traditional Pharmacy, School of Traditional Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Anti-Freckles Herbal Treatment in Iranian Traditional Medicine.
[So] Source:Iran J Med Sci;41(3):S22, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:0253-0716
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Freckles are numerous pigmented spots of the skin, mainly confined to the face, even arms and back. Although freckles are light-brown macules, most frequently observed in individuals with red or blond hair, they are common to Asian people too. Freckles increase in number, size, and depth of pigmentation during the summer months. Histologically, freckles show increased production of melanin pigment by a normal number of melanocytes. Freckles commonly stop spreading before adolescence and last for life, but could sometimes be subtle in adulthood. Treatments are often requested for cosmetic purposes. Before the advent of lasers, treatment modalities for pigmentary disorders included surgical excision, dermabrasion, chemical bleaching, and peeling. These treatments may lead to unwanted side effects of potential scarring or undesired pigmentation changes. In Iranian traditional medicine (ITM), freckles have been known as well. "Namash" was the term used by ITM scholars to indicate freckles. There is a wide range of plants, which were prescribed by Iranian physicians for the treatment of freckles. The purpose of this study is to find the most frequent useful herbs for freckles as mentioned in ITM references. METHODS: Seven ITM references were studied for anti-freckles medicines. The references were Canon of Medicine (Avicenna), Alhavi (Razes) Tuhfat ul-Momineen (Momen tonekaboni), Makhzan-ul-Adwiah (Aghili), Ikhtiyarat Badi'i (Ansari), Al-abnia An-Haghyegh el-advia (Heravi), and al-jami li-mufradat al-adwiyawa al-aghdhiya (Ibn al-Baitar). Moreover, plants were ordered according to their repetition in the references. Afterwards, traditional names of the selected plants were matched with the scientific names using botanical text references. RESULTS: This study demonstrated that Myristica fragrans Houtt, Cicer arietema L., Eruca sativa Lam., Lilium candidium L., Amygdalus communis L., Arum italicum L. were the most frequent herbs mentioned in ITM references for the treatment of freckles. CONCLUSION: Herbs mentioned in this article could be appropriate candidates for future studies in the field of freckles treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1608
[Cu] Class update date: 160817
[Lr] Last revision date:160817
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160813
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  4 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27469097
[Au] Autor:Zhang S; Chen T; Li W; Dong Q; Xiong Y
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Energy Thermal Conversion and Control of Ministry of Education, School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China.
[Ti] Title:Physicochemical properties and combustion behavior of duckweed during wet torrefaction.
[So] Source:Bioresour Technol;218:1157-62, 2016 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2976
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Wet torrefaction of duckweed was carried out in the temperature range of 130-250°C to evaluate the effects on physicochemical properties and combustion behavior. The physicochemical properties of duckweed samples were investigated by ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, FTIR, XRD and SEM techniques. It was found that wet torrefaction improved the fuel characteristics of duckweed samples resulting from the increase in fixed carbon content, HHVs and the decrease in nitrogen and sulfur content and atomic ratios of O/C and H/C. It can be seen from the results of FTIR, XRD and SEM analyses that the dehydration, decarboxylation, solid-solid conversion, and condensation polymerization reactions were underwent during wet torrefaction. In addition, the results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in air indicated that wet torrefaction resulted in significant changes on combustion behavior and combustion kinetics parameters. Duckweed samples after wet torrefaction behaved more char-like and gave better combustion characteristics than raw sample.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arum/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biomass
Kinetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170202
[Lr] Last revision date:170202
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160730
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27348569
[Au] Autor:Kim HS; Guzman AR; Thapa HR; Devarenne TP; Han A
[Ad] Address:Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
[Ti] Title:Cover Image, Volume 113, Number 8, August 2016.
[So] Source:Biotechnol Bioeng;113(8):i, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0290
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cover Legend The cover image, by Arum Han et al., is based on the Article A droplet microfluidics platform for rapid microalgal growth and oil production analysis, DOI: 10.1002/bit.25930.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Microalgae
Microfluidic Analytical Techniques
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Microalgae/growth & development
Microalgae/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171006
[Lr] Last revision date:171006
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160628
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/bit.25778

  6 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27125594
[Au] Autor:Ali-Shtayeh MS; Jamous RM; Salameh NM; Jamous RM; Hamadeh AM
[Ad] Address:Biodiversity and Environmental Research Center-BERC, Til-Nablus, Palestine. Electronic address: msshtayeh@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Complementary and alternative medicine use among cancer patients in Palestine with special reference to safety-related concerns.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;187:104-22, 2016 Jul 01.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The use of CAM including herbal medicine as the most preferred CAM modality, among cancer patients who are taking prescription medications has shown to be highly prevalent worldwide as well as in several Middle Eastern countries, with a high percentage of the patients do not disclose their CAM use to treating physician. AIM OF THE STUDY: The current study aimed to evaluate the patterns of CAM use among two cohorts of cancer patients in Palestine over a three-year period, and to identify socio-demographic factors that are associated with CAM use. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Across-sectional survey of patients attending outpatient cancer clinics. The method was based on a semi-structured questionnaire. In order to identify safety-related concerns associated with the products listed, a literature search was conducted using different databases (PubMed, Micromedex, AltMedDex, and the Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database). RESULTS: In 472 cancer patients including 372 of the 2011 cohort; and 100 of the 2014 cohort, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 69.5%. CAM users were more likely to be ≤65 years old, village resident, being in the midst of chemotherapy, to have high interest spiritual quest, and to have no other chronic diseases. A significant number of CAM users reported using herbal preparations (98.3%, and 89.6% in the two study cohorts, respectively). In the current study, a total of 40 plant taxa belonging to 23 botanical families were reported by ≥3 cancer patients in the two cohort groups. The top most commonly used plant in the 2011 cohort group was Arum palaestinum (43.5%), while Ephedra foeminea emerged as the top most commonly utilized plant (from 0.0% in 2011 to 55.2% in the 2014 cohort), mainly due to a recent publicizing and portraying of the plant in the local media as an effective cancer herbal remedy. Safety-related concerns were associated with 33 (82.5%) herbs, including herb-drug interactions with altered pharmacokinetics (8, 20% herbs), direct toxic effects (16, 40% herbs), and increased in vitro response of cancer cells to chemotherapy (30, 75% herbs). CONCLUSIONS: CAM use, especially herbal medicine in cancer is highly prevalent in Palestine. This study has demonstrated the role of the media on the emergence of new CAM herbal therapies among cancer patients in Palestine, and discussed its potential implications on patients and for oncologists who are treating them. Some of the most widely used herbal medicines by cancer patients in the present work are known to interact with conventional anticancer drugs. Hence, the disclosure of the use of herbal remedies by patients to health professionals with sufficient training in CAM use is important for the later in order to assess whether there are any possible herbal drug interactions and/or harmful drug reactions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Complementary Therapies/adverse effects
Neoplasms/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Female
Herb-Drug Interactions
Humans
Male
Middle East
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170302
[Lr] Last revision date:170302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160430
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27042410
[Au] Autor:Jebasingh FK; Salam R; Meetei TL; Singh PT; Singh NN; Prasad L
[Ad] Address:Department of General Medicine, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, Manipur, India.
[Ti] Title:Reference intervals in evaluation of maternal thyroid function of Manipuri women.
[So] Source:Indian J Endocrinol Metab;20(2):167-70, 2016 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2230-8210
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: The population of Manipur is of different ethnic background from the rest of the country. Several authors have suggested population/ethnic and laboratory specific reference range of maternal thyroid profile of different trimesters. AIMS: To find the reference range of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), total thyroxine (TT4) and total tri-iodothyronine (TT3) levels for normal pregnant women of native Manipur descendants. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The cross-sectional study was conducted at a teaching Institute after ethical clearance was obtained. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A reference populations of 375 normal pregnant women were established after screening about 600 pregnant women. The study excluded patients with hyperemesis gravid arum, past history or family history of thyroid disorders as well as the connective tissue disorders, WHO grade 1 or 2 goiter, or any medications that alter thyroid functions. The serum levels of TSH, TT4, and TT3 were measured using chemiluminescence assay. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Data for TT3 and TT4 were expressed as mean ± standard deviation, median and 5-95(th) percentiles. RESULTS: The mean TSH in the three trimesters was 1.06 + 0.45, 1.23 + 0.30, and 1.25 + 0.36, respectively. The normal reference range thus was different from that of the kit reference range. On comparing to the Indian normative reference for the pregnant women, our results were not similar. However, the values were near similar to that of the American Thyroid Association guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude our study results with a new reference range for the pregnant population in Manipur and also emphasis the use of trimester-specific reference range of thyroid hormone.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160405
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2230-8210.176354

  8 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26894756
[Au] Autor:Gucwa-Przepióra E; Chmura D; Sokolowska K
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany and Nature Protection, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Silesia, Jagiellonska 28, 40-032, Katowice, Poland. egucwaprzepiora@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:AM and DSE colonization of invasive plants in urban habitat: a study of Upper Silesia (southern Poland).
[So] Source:J Plant Res;129(4):603-14, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1618-0860
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Interactions between invasive plants and root endophytes may contribute to the exploration of plant invasion causes. Twenty plant species of alien origin differing in invasiveness were studied in terms of status and typical structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and dark septate endophytes (DSE) in urban habitats in Silesia Upland (southern Poland). We observed that 75 % of investigated plant species were mycorrhizal. The arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) of most plant species was of the Arum morphology. The nearly 100 % mycorrhizal frequency, high intensity of AM colonization within root cortex and the presence of arbuscules in all mycorrhizal plant species indicate that the investigated species are able to establish AM associations in the secondary range and urban habitats. DSE were present in all mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal species. The frequency of DSE was significantly lower in non-mycorrhizal group of plants, however, sclerotia of DSE were found mainly in the roots of non-mycorrhizal plant species. The group of species native to North America including three Solidago congeners have the highest values of all AM mycorrhization and DSE indices. Moreover, we observed that most mycorrhizal invasive species belonged to the family Asteraceae. In turn, representatives of Poaceae had the lowest values of AM mycorrhization. Nevertheless, quite high values of DSE frequency were also encountered in roots of Poaceae species. The high invasiveness of the representatives of the Asteraceae family from North America support theory that both taxonomic pattern, and the fact of root endophytes colonization contribute to invasion success. While, the taxa of Reynoutria also represent successful invaders but they are of Asiatic origin, non-mycorrhizal and weakly colonized by DSE fungi.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cities
Ecosystem
Endophytes/physiology
Introduced Species
Mycorrhizae/physiology
Plants/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cluster Analysis
Monte Carlo Method
Poland
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170410
[Lr] Last revision date:170410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160220
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10265-016-0802-7

  9 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26599199
[Au] Autor:Ben-Arye E; Samuels N; Goldstein LH; Mutafoglu K; Omran S; Schiff E; Charalambous H; Dweikat T; Ghrayeb I; Bar-Sela G; Turker I; Hassan A; Hassan E; Saad B; Nimri O; Kebudi R; Silbermann M
[Ad] Address:Integrative Oncology Program, The Oncology Service and Lin Medical Center, Clalit Health Services, Haifa and Western Galilee District, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Potential risks associated with traditional herbal medicine use in cancer care: A study of Middle Eastern oncology health care professionals.
[So] Source:Cancer;122(4):598-610, 2016 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0142
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The authors assessed the use of herbal medicine by Middle Eastern patients with cancer, as reported by their oncology health care professionals (HCPs). Herbal products identified by the study HCPs were evaluated for potential negative effects. METHODS: Oncology HCPs from 16 Middle Eastern countries received a 17-item questionnaire asking them to list 5 herbal products in use by their patients with cancer. A literature search (PubMed, Micromedex, AltMedDex, and the Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database) was conducted to identify safety-related concerns associated with the products listed. RESULTS: A total of 339 HCPs completed the study questionnaire (response rate of 80.3%), identifying 44 herbal and 3 nonherbal nutritional supplements. Safety-related concerns were associated with 29 products, including herb-drug interactions with altered pharmacodynamics (15 herbs), direct toxic effects (18 herbs), and increased in vitro response of cancer cells to chemotherapy (7 herbs). CONCLUSIONS: Herbal medicine use, which is prevalent in Middle Eastern countries, has several potentially negative effects that include direct toxic effects, negative interactions with anticancer drugs, and increased chemosensitivity of cancer cells, requiring a reduction in dose-density. Oncology HCPs working in countries in which herbal medicine use is prevalent need to better understand the implications of this practice. The presence of integrative physicians with training in complementary and traditional medicine can help patients and their HCPs reach an informed decision regarding the safety and effective use of these products.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use
Herb-Drug Interactions
Medical Oncology
Neoplasms/drug therapy
Phytotherapy/utilization
Plant Preparations/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Allied Health Personnel
Animals
Arum
Camelus
Curcuma
Daucus carota
Female
Garlic
Herbal Medicine/statistics & numerical data
Honey
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East
Milk
Nigella sativa
Physicians
Plant Preparations/therapeutic use
Research Personnel
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urtica dioica
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 0 (Plant Preparations)
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 161126
[Lr] Last revision date:161126
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/cncr.29796

  10 / 211 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26552380
[Au] Autor:Chartier M; Liagre S; Weiss-Schneeweiss H; Kolano B; Bessière JM; Schönenberger J; Gibernau M
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, 1030, Vienna, Austria. chartier.marion@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Floral traits and pollination ecology of European Arum hybrids.
[So] Source:Oecologia;180(2):439-51, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hybridisation is common in plants and can affect the genetic diversity and ecology of sympatric parental populations. Hybrids may resemble the parental species in their ecology, leading to competition and/or gene introgression; alternatively, they may diverge from the parental phenotypes, possibly leading to the colonisation of new ecological niches and to speciation. Here, we describe inflorescence morphology, ploidy levels, pollinator attractive scents, and pollinator guilds of natural hybrids of Arum italicum and A. maculatum (Araceae) from a site with sympatric parental populations in southern France to determine how these traits affect the hybrid pollination ecology. Hybrids were characterised by inflorescences with a size and a number of flowers more similar to A. italicum than to A. maculatum. In most cases, hybrid stamens were purple, as in A. maculatum, and spadix appendices yellow, as in A. italicum. Hybrid floral scent was closer to that of A. italicum, but shared some compounds with A. maculatum and comprised unique compounds. Also, the pollinator guild of the hybrids was similar to that of A. italicum. Nevertheless, the hybrids attracted a high proportion of individuals of the main pollinator of A. maculatum. We discuss the effects of hybridisation in sympatric parental zones in which hybrids exhibit low levels of reproductive success, the establishment of reproductive barriers between parental species, the role of the composition of floral attractive scents in the differential attraction of pollinators and in the competition between hybrids and their parental species, and the potential of hybridisation to give rise to new independent lineages.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arum/genetics
Flowers
Hybridization, Genetic
Phenotype
Pollination
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Ecology
Flowers/anatomy & histology
France
Inflorescence
Insecta
Odorants
Pheromones
Ploidies
Reproduction
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Pheromones)
[Em] Entry month:1609
[Cu] Class update date: 171116
[Lr] Last revision date:171116
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-015-3498-9


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