Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Ascariasis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29523472
[Au] Autor:Sharma M; Somani P
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Jaswant Rai Speciality Hospital, Saket, Meerut 250 001, Uttar Pradesh, India. Electronic address: sharmamalay@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:EUS of pancreatic ascariasis.
[So] Source:Arab J Gastroenterol;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2090-2387
[Cp] Country of publication:Egypt
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ascaris is a common cause of acute pancreatitis in developing countries. The mechanism of ascariasis induced acute pancreatitis include obstruction of papilla of Vater, invasion of common bile duct, or pancreatic duct (PD). PD ascariasis is a rare diagnosis. Endoscopic ultrasound is a highly accurate method to diagnose the aetiology of idiopathic acute pancreatitis with reference to biliary and pancreatic ascariasis. Treatment usually consist of endoscopic removal of worms with dormia basket or forceps on side viewing endoscopy. Ascaris induced pancreatitis is generally mild and worm extraction is associated with rapid relief of symptoms. We present a case of PD ascariasis diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29320821
[Au] Autor:Choi JH; Seo M
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan 31116, Korea.
[Ti] Title:A Case of Biliary Ascariasis in Korea.
[So] Source:Korean J Parasitol;55(6):659-660, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1738-0006
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biliary ascariasis is still the leading cause of surgical complication of ascariasis, though its incidence has been dramatically reduced. Herein, we report a case of biliary ascariasis for the purpose of enhancing awareness of parasitic infections as a possible cause. A 72-year-old male visited the emergency room of Dankook University Hospital on 12 July 2015, complaining of right-upper-quadrant pain. By endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), a tubular filling defect in the right hepatic duct was detected. The defect was endoscopically removed and diagnosed as an adult female of Ascaris lumbricoides worm, of 30 cm length. Upon removal of the worm, the pain subsided, and the patient was discharged without any complication. When treating cases of biliary colic, physicians should not neglect biliary ascariasis as the possible cause.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ascariasis/parasitology
Ascariasis/surgery
Ascaris lumbricoides/isolation & purification
Bile Duct Diseases/parasitology
Bile Duct Diseases/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abdominal Pain/etiology
Aged
Animals
Ascariasis/complications
Ascariasis/diagnostic imaging
Bile Duct Diseases/complications
Bile Duct Diseases/diagnostic imaging
Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde
Hepatic Duct, Common/diagnostic imaging
Hepatic Duct, Common/parasitology
Hepatic Duct, Common/surgery
Humans
Male
Republic of Korea
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3347/kjp.2017.55.6.659

  3 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518367
[Au] Autor:Ilyas M; Wani MY; Ganaie KH; Mohammad G; Dar MA
[Ad] Address:Senior Resident, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, IN 190011. Electronic address: ilyasmir40@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A Worm Hole: Liver Abscess in Ascariasis.
[So] Source:Am J Med;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1555-7162
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29222943
[Au] Autor:Brieau B; Loulergue P; Coriat R
[Ad] Address:Gastroenterology Unit, Cochin Teaching Hospital, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.
[Ti] Title:Ascariasis seen by videocapsule endoscopy.
[So] Source:Dig Endosc;30(2):273-274, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1443-1661
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/den.12997

  5 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29502555
[Au] Autor:Palma A; Ortiz B; Mendoza L; Matamoros G; Gabrie JA; Sánchez AL; Fontecha G
[Ad] Address:Escuela de Microbiología,Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras (UNAH),Ciudad Universitaria,J1 Edificio,4piso,UNAH,Tegucigalpa,Honduras.
[Ti] Title:Molecular analysis of human- and pig-derived Ascaris in Honduras.
[So] Source:J Helminthol;:1-5, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1475-2697
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ascaris sp. is a soil-transmitted helminth (STH) significantly affecting the health of human and swine populations. Health inequities and poverty, with resulting deficiencies in water, sanitation and hygiene, are directly associated with Ascaris lumbricoides prevalence in humans. Resource constraints also lead to small-scale livestock production under unsanitary conditions. Free-ranging pigs, for instance, are exposed to a number of infectious agents, among which Ascaris suum is one of the most common. Under these conditions, close proximity between people and pigs can result in cross-contamination; that is, pigs harbouring human Ascaris and vice versa. Moreover, the potential interbreeding between these two Ascaris species has been demonstrated. The present study analysed Ascaris worms obtained from children and pigs in Honduras. Adult worms were collected from stool samples of children after pharmacological treatment, and from pigs' intestines after slaughter for commercial purposes at a local abattoir. A nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and digested with a restriction enzyme in order to separate putative human- and pig-derived Ascaris isolates. PCR products were also sequenced, and cladograms were constructed. All parasites isolated from children showed the typical human-derived genotype of Ascaris, whereas 91% of parasites from pigs showed the expected pig-derived genotype. Cross-infections between hosts were not demonstrated in this study. Nine per cent of pig-derived worms showed a restriction band pattern highly suggestive of a hybrid human-pig Ascaris genotype. These results contribute to the understanding of ascariasis epidemiology and its zoonotic potential in a highly endemic region.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0022149X18000160

  6 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29478163
[Au] Autor:Amoah ID; Reddy P; Seidu R; Stenström TA
[Ad] Address:Institute for Water and Wastewater Technology, Durban University of Technology, PO Box 1334, Durban, 4000, South Africa. amoahkid@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Removal of helminth eggs by centralized and decentralized wastewater treatment plants in South Africa and Lesotho: health implications for direct and indirect exposure to the effluents.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Wastewater may contain contaminants harmful to human health; hence, there is the need for treatment before discharge. Centralized wastewater treatment systems are the favored treatment options globally, but these are not necessarily superior in reduction of pathogens as compared to decentralized wastewater treatment systems (collectively called DEWATS). This study was therefore undertaken to assess the soil-transmitted helminth (STH) and Taenia sp. egg reduction efficiency of selected anaerobic baffled reactors and planted gravel filters compared to centralized wastewater treatment plants in South Africa and Lesotho. The risk of ascariasis with exposure to effluents from the centralized wastewater treatment plants was also assessed using the quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) approach. Eggs of Ascaris spp., hookworm, Trichuris spp., Taenia spp., and Toxocara spp. were commonly detected in the untreated wastewater. The DEWATS plants removed between 95 and 100% of the STH and Taenia sp. eggs, with centralized plants removing between 67 and 100%. Helminth egg concentrations in the final effluents from the centralized wastewater treatment plants were consistently higher than those in the WHO recommended guideline (≤ 1 helminth egg/L) for agricultural use resulting in higher risk of ascariasis. Therefore, in conclusion, DEWATS plants may be more efficient in reducing the concentration of helminth eggs in wastewater, resulting in lower risks of STH infections upon exposure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-018-1503-7

  7 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29458300
[Au] Autor:Claus PE; Ceuppens AS; Cool M; Alliet G
[Ad] Address:a Clinical Laboratory of Microbiology , AZ Damiaan , Ostend , Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Ascaris lumbricoides: challenges in diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies in a European refugee camp.
[So] Source:Acta Clin Belg;:1-4, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:2295-3337
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES:  The roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides is one of the most prevalent parasites belonging to the class of the soil-transmitted helminths. Infections are most common in developing countries with a tropical climate where sanitation and hygiene are poor. However, prevalence of ascariasis in industrialized countries is increasing because of immigration and increasing number of refugees. METHODS:  We report a case of ascariasis in a female patient who was admitted to our hospital after she had left the informal refugee camp of Calais in the north of France. RESULTS:  After colonoscopic removal of the worm and treatment with mebendazole during three days the patient's symptoms had completely resolved. Medical treatment with benzimidazole derivatives is easy and inexpensive. To prevent parasitic infections in larger populations, mass drug administration should be repeated periodically and must be implemented along with additional measures such as improvements to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). These WASH programs have been proven to be highly effective, but access and follow-up are expensive and very difficult to organize in refugee camps, even in wealthy, industrialized countries. CONCLUSIONS: Despite being an old, well-known parasitic disease, ascariasis might reappear in certain populations at risk in industrialized countries. Detection, treatment and follow-up of these patients, and the organization of preventive measures remain challenging.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/17843286.2018.1436956

  8 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29382360
[Au] Autor:Wright JE; Werkman M; Dunn JC; Anderson RM
[Ad] Address:Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, London, W2 1PG, UK. james.e.wright@imperial.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:Current epidemiological evidence for predisposition to high or low intensity human helminth infection: a systematic review.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):65, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The human helminth infections include ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infections, schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. It is estimated that almost 2 billion people worldwide are infected with helminths. Whilst the WHO treatment guidelines for helminth infections are mostly aimed at controlling morbidity, there has been a recent shift with some countries moving towards goals of disease elimination through mass drug administration, especially for LF and onchocerciasis. However, as prevalence is driven lower, treating entire populations may no longer be the most efficient or cost-effective strategy. Instead, it may be beneficial to identify individuals or demographic groups who are persistently infected, often termed as being "predisposed" to infection, and target treatment at them. METHODS: The authors searched Embase, MEDLINE, Global Health, and Web of Science for all English language, human-based papers investigating predisposition to helminth infections published up to October 31st, 2017. The varying definitions used to describe predisposition, and the statistical tests used to determine its presence, are summarised. Evidence for predisposition is presented, stratified by helminth species, and risk factors for predisposition to infection are identified and discussed. RESULTS: In total, 43 papers were identified, summarising results from 34 different studies in 23 countries. Consistent evidence of predisposition to infection with certain species of human helminth was identified. Children were regularly found to experience greater predisposition to Ascaris lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium than adults. Females were found to be more predisposed to A. lumbricoides infection than were males. Household clustering of infection was identified for A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura and S. japonicum. Ascaris lumbricoides and T. trichiura also showed evidence of familial predisposition. Whilst strong evidence for predisposition to hookworm infection was identified, findings with regards to which groups were affected were considerably more varied than for other helminth species. CONCLUSION: This review has found consistent evidence of predisposition to heavy (and light) infection for certain human helminth species. However, further research is needed to identify reasons for the reported differences between demographic groups. Molecular epidemiological methods associated with whole genome sequencing to determine 'who infects whom' may shed more light on the factors generating predisposition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2656-4

  9 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346440
[Au] Autor:Silver ZA; Kaliappan SP; Samuel P; Venugopal S; Kang G; Sarkar R; Ajjampur SSR
[Ad] Address:Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Geographical distribution of soil transmitted helminths and the effects of community type in South Asia and South East Asia - A systematic review.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(1):e0006153, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are among the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases (NTD) worldwide. Since the publication of the WHO road map to combat NTD in 2012, there has been a renewed commitment to control STH. In this study, we analysed the geographical distribution and effect of community type on prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris and Ascaris in south Asia and south east Asia. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a systematic review of open-access literature published in PubMed Central and the Global Atlas of Helminth Infection. A total of 4182 articles were available and after applying selection criteria, 174 studies from the region were retained for analysis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ascaris was the commonest STH identified with an overall prevalence of 18% (95% CI, 14-23%) followed by Trichuris (14%, 9-19%) and hookworm (12%, 9-15%). Hookworm prevalence was highest in Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia. We found a geographical overlap in countries with high prevalence rates for Trichuris and Ascaris (Malaysia, Philippines, Myanmar, Vietnam and Bangladesh). When the effect of community type was examined, prevalence rates of hookworm was comparable in rural (19%, 14-24%) and tribal communities (14%, 10-19%). Tribal communities, however, showed higher prevalence of Trichuris (38%, 18-63%) and Ascaris (32%, 23-43%) than rural communities (13%, 9-20% and 14%, 9-20% respectively). Considerable between and within country heterogeneity in the distribution of STH (I2 >90%) was also noted. When available data from school aged children (SAC) were analysed, prevalence of Ascaris (25% 16-31%) and Trichuris (22%, 14-34%) were higher than among the general population while that of hookworm (10%, 7-16%) was comparable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis showed significant variation in prevalence rates between and within countries in the region. Highlighting the importance of community type in prevalence and species mix, we showed that tribal and rural communities had higher hookworm infections than urban communities and for ascariasis and trichuriasis, tribal populations had higher levels of infection than rural populations. We also found a higher prevalence of ascariasis and trichuriasis in SAC compared to the general population but comparable levels of hookworm infections. These key findings need to be taken into account in planning future MDA and other interventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180128
[Lr] Last revision date:180128
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006153

  10 / 4593 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29329599
[Au] Autor:Ismaili-Jaha V; Toro H; Spahiu L; Azemi M; Hoxha-Kamberi T; Avdiu M; Spahiu-Konjusha S; Jaha L
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University Clinical Center of Kosovo, Prishtina, Kosovo. vlora.jaha@uni-pr.edu.
[Ti] Title:Gallbladder ascariasis in Kosovo - focus on ultrasound and conservative therapy: a case series.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):8, 2018 Jan 13.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Ascaris lumbricoides is one of the most common intestinal infections in developing countries, including Kosovo. In contrast to migration to the bile duct, migration of the worm to the gallbladder, due to the narrow and tortuous nature of the cystic duct, is rare. When it does occur, it incites acalculous cholecystitis. CASE PRESENTATIONS: This case series describes a 16-month-old Albanian girl, a 22-month-old Albanian girl, a 4-year-old Albanian girl, and a 10-year-old Albanian boy. Here we report our experience with gallbladder ascariasis including clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, and treatment. Fever, diarrhea and vomiting, dehydration, pale appearance, and weakness were the manifestations of the primary disease. In all patients, a physical examination revealed reduced turgor and elasticity of the skin. Abdomen was at the level of the chest, soft, with minimal palpatory pain. The liver and spleen were not palpable. A laboratory examination was not specific except for eosinophilia. There were no pathogenic bacteria in coproculture but Ascaris was found in all patients. At an ultrasound examination in all cases we found single, long, linear echogenic structure without acoustic shadowing containing a central, longitudinal anechoic tube with characteristic movement within the gallbladder. Edema of the gallbladder wall was suggestive of associated inflammation. There were no other findings on adjacent structures and organs. All patients received mebendazole 100 mg twice a day for 3 days. They also received symptomatic therapy for gastroenteritis. Because of elevated markers of inflammation all patients were treated with antibiotics, assuming acute cholecystitis, although ultrasound was able to confirm cholecystitis in only two of our four patients. Since the length of stay was dependent on the primary pathology it was 7 to 10 days. At control ultrasounds on 14th day, third and sixth month, all patients were free of ascariasis. CONCLUSIONS: Gallbladder ascariasis should be considered in all patients presenting with abdominal pain, distension, colic, nausea, anorexia, and intermittent diarrhea associated with jaundice, nausea, vomiting, fever, and severe radiating pain. Eosinophilia, ova, and parasites on stool examination as well as an anechogenic tube with characteristic movement within the bile duct found on abdominal ultrasound are conclusive for diagnosis. Mebendazole is an effective drug for the treatment. Surgical treatment is rarely needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180119
[Lr] Last revision date:180119
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-017-1536-4


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