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[PMID]: 28486688
[Au] Autor:Glazer CH; Bonde JP; Giwercman A; Vassard D; Pinborg A; Schmidt L; Vaclavik Bräuner E
[Ad] Address:Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, DK-2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Risk of diabetes according to male factor infertility: a register-based cohort study.
[So] Source:Hum Reprod;32(7):1474-1481, 2017 Jul 01.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2350
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY QUESTION: Is male factor infertility associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes? SUMMARY ANSWER: The study provides evidence that male factor infertility may predict later occurrence of diabetes mellitus with the risk being related to the severity of the underlying fertility problem. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Previous cross-sectional studies have shown an increased prevalence of comorbidities among infertile men when compared to controls. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: In this prospective cohort study, 39 516 men who had since 1994 undergone fertility treatment with their female partner were identified from the Danish national IVF register, which includes data on assumed cause of couple infertility (male/female factor, mixed and unexplained infertility) and type of fertility treatment. With a median follow-up time of 5.6 years, each man was followed for diabetes occurrence from enrollment until 31 December 2012 using the National Diabetes Register (NDR). Men with a history of diabetes prior to their fertility diagnosis were excluded. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models with age as the underlying time scale. In addition to analyzing the data for the entire IVF registration period (1994-2012), separate analyses were performed for men identified from the first (1994-2005) and second (2006-2012) IVF registration period owing to heterogeneity in the reporting of male factor infertility in these two time periods, because the reason for male factor infertility was not available from the first register. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Male factor infertility was identified from the variable 'yes' or 'no' from the first IVF register and through a diagnosis code (e.g. oligospermia, azoospermia) from the second IVF register. The reference group was men with male factor infertility (='no') and those with normal semen quality or sterilized men. Of the included men, 18 499 (46.8%) had male factor infertility and 21 017 (53.2%) made up the reference group. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: A total of 651 (1.6%) diabetes cases were identified during the follow-up period. The adjusted HR's for diabetes risk among men with male factor infertility when compared to the reference group were HR = 1.08 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.31) and HR = 1.45 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.97) for the first and second IVF registration period, respectively. When assessing the effects of individual causes of male factor infertility, the adjusted HR's for men with oligospermia, azoospermia and aspermia were HR = 1.44 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.06), HR = 2.10 (95% 1.25, 3.56) and HR = 3.20 (95% CI 1.00, 10.31), respectively. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: We found no increased risk among men identified from the first IVF register, which may be related to exposure misclassification as the reason for male factor infertility was not available from this time period. The NDR does not distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: These findings support previous studies that a man's reproductive and somatic health are closely intertwined and highlight the importance for further monitoring of these men. Further, implementation of diabetes screening may be especially relevant among aspermic and azoospermic men. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: This article is part of the ReproUnion collaborative study, co-financed by the European Union, Intereg V Öresund-Kattegat-Skagerrak. None of the authors declare any conflict of interest. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: None.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 171012
[Lr] Last revision date:171012
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/humrep/dex097

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[PMID]: 27865415
[Au] Autor:Roy VK; Peki V; Devi MS; Sanjeev S; Khusboo M; Zothansanga R; Ibrahim KS; Kumar NS; Gurusubramanian G
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, Mizoram Central University, Aizawl, Mizoram, India.
[Ti] Title:Biosterilant effects of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki HD-73 extract on male Wistar albino rats.
[So] Source:Theriogenology;88:73-83, 2017 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3231
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chemosterilants have long been used in sterilization programs for managing pet, stray, and wild animals but adverse effects such as trauma, incomplete responses to treatment, and complete abolition of gonadal sources of testosterone often occurs. This study describes the biosterilant effects of administering three doses of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki HD-73 (Bt 5, 50, and 250 mg/kg; 20 rats/dose) extract in adult male Wistar albino rats on testicular parameters, function, histology, and a number of biochemical markers of overall health, free radical production, and cell proliferation. Intratesticular administration of Bt extract to rats induces testicular oxidative stress and damages and consequently, perturb spermatogenesis, degeneration of testis, reduction in testes size, and depletion of testosterone and antioxidant enzyme concentrations in a dose-dependent manner because of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation. No morbidity or mortality adverse effects were observed in both the saline control and Bt extract-treated rats. Significant variation was noted in clinical manifestations, weight and volume of testes, and hormonal and biochemical profiles between Bt doses in comparison with the saline control. Aspermia/azoospermia (100%) resulted in Bt-treated rats without any adverse effects. Histopathological analysis showed degeneration, necrosis, vacuolation, fewer germ cells, formation of multinucleated giant cells, and a lack of elongated spermatids in atrophic seminiferous tubules in Bt extract-treated groups in the presence of low concentrations of testosterone, antioxidant enzymes, and suppression of germ cell proliferation. Dose-dependent effects were evident in most parameters that were measured. The vast array of tests that were undertaken also provides some important indicators of the physiological effects associated with the treatments that were applied. Intratesticular injection of Bt extract impairs spermatogenesis and induces permanent sterility in rats.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacillus thuringiensis/chemistry
Chemosterilants/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Asparaginase/drug effects
Blood Glucose/drug effects
Body Weight/drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Eating/drug effects
Liver/drug effects
Male
Organ Size
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Testis/anatomy & histology
Testis/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Blood Glucose); 0 (Chemosterilants); EC 3.5.1.1 (Asparaginase)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170512
[Lr] Last revision date:170512
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161121
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27864361
[Au] Autor:Punab M; Poolamets O; Paju P; Vihljajev V; Pomm K; Ladva R; Korrovits P; Laan M
[Ad] Address:Andrology Center, Tartu University Hospital, 50406 Tartu, Estonia margus.punab@kliinikum.ee.
[Ti] Title:Causes of male infertility: a 9-year prospective monocentre study on 1737 patients with reduced total sperm counts.
[So] Source:Hum Reprod;32(1):18-31, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2350
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY QUESTION: What are the primary causes of severe male factor infertility? SUMMARY ANSWER: Although 40% of all patients showed primary causes of infertility, which could be subdivided into three groups based on the severity of their effect, ~75% of oligozoospermia cases remained idiopathic. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: There are few large-scale epidemiological studies analyzing the causes of male factor infertility. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A prospective clinical-epidemiological study was conducted at the Andrology Centre, Tartu University Hospital between 2005 and 2013, recruiting male partners of couples failing to conceive a child for over ≥12 months. Among 8518 patients, 1737 (20.4%) were diagnosed with severe male factor infertility. A reference group of fertile controls was comprised of 325 partners of pregnant women. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: The mean age of infertility patients and fertile controls was 33.2 ± 7.3 and 31.7 ± 6.3 years, respectively. All participants were examined using a standardized andrology workup, accompanied by a structured medical interview. Hormonal analysis included serum FSH, LH and testosterone. Semen quality was determined in accordance to the World Health Organization recommendations. Cases with spermatozoa concentrations of ≤5 million/ml were screened for chromosomal aberrations and Y-chromosomal microdeletions. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The primary cause of infertility was defined for 695 of 1737 patients (~40%). The analyzed causal factors could be divided into absolute (secondary hypogonadism, genetic causes, seminal tract obstruction), severe (oncological diseases, severe sexual dysfunction) and plausible causal factors (congenital anomalies in uro-genital tract, acquired or secondary testicular damage). The latter were also detected for 11 (3.4%) men with proven fertility (diagnoses: unilateral cryptorchidism, testis cancer, orchitis, mumps orchitis). The causal factors behind the most severe forms of impaired spermatogenesis were relatively well understood; causes were assigned: for aspermia in 46/46 cases (100%), for azoospermia in 321/388 cases (82.7%), and for cryptozoospermia in 54/130 cases (41.5%). In contrast, 75% of oligozoospermia cases remained unexplained. The main cause of aspermia was severe sexual dysfunction (71.7% of aspermia patients). Azoospermia patients accounted for 86.4% of all cases diagnosed with secondary hypogonadism and 97.1% of patients with seminal tract obstruction. Of patients with a known genetic factor, 87.4% had extreme infertility (azoo-, crypto- or aspermia). The prevalence of congenital anomalies in the uro-genital tract was not clearly correlated with the severity of impaired sperm production. Previously defined 'potential contributing factors' varicocele and leukocytospermia were excluded as the primary causes of male infertility. However, their incidence was >2-fold higher (31.0 vs 13.5% and 16.1 vs 7.4%; P < 0.001) in the idiopathic infertility group compared to controls. In addition, the proportions of overweight (or obese) patients and patients suffering from a chronic disease were significantly increased in almost all of the patient subgroups. LIMITATIONS REASONS FOR CAUTION: The study included only subjects with reduced total spermatozoa counts. Thus, these findings cannot be automatically applied to all male factor infertility cases. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: The novel insights and improved clarity achieved in the comprehensive analysis regarding the absolute, causative and plausible factors behind male infertility, as well as the 'potential contributing factors', will be valuable tools in updating the current clinical guidelines. The study highlights knowledge gaps and reiterates an urgent need to uncover the causes and mechanisms behind, and potential treatments of, oligozoospermic cases, representing the majority of idiopathic infertility patients (86.3%). STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: The project was financed by the EU through the ERDF, project HAPPY PREGNANCY, no. 3.2.0701.12-004 (M.P., M.L.) and the Estonian Research Council: grants PUT181 (M.P.) and IUT34-12 (M.L.). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript. We have no competing interests to declare. TRAIL  REGISTRATION NUMBER: Not applicable.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1611
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 27765881
[Au] Autor:Lent EM; Crouse LC; Wallace SM
[Ad] Address:Army Public Health Center, Toxicology Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, USA emily.m.lent.civ@mail.mil.
[Ti] Title:Oral Toxicity of 2,4-Dinitroanisole in Rats.
[So] Source:Int J Toxicol;35(6):692-711, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1092-874X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Subacute and subchronic studies were conducted to assess the toxicity of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) and to provide information important for protecting the health of military and civilian personnel. In the subchronic study, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DNAN via oral gavage at 0, 1.25, 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg/d. Likely owing to its conversion to 2,4-dinitrophenol, an inhibitor of energy homeostasis, DNAN caused an apparent increase in metabolism, leading to reduced feed efficiency ratios and body mass gains in males. Anemia, splenic enlargement, hemosiderosis, and extramedullary hematopoiesis indicated blood as a target organ, with females more sensitive than males. The DNAN was a testicular toxicant, causing decreased mass of testes and epididymides, as well as degeneration and atrophy of testicular seminiferous tubules and epididymal aspermia. Stereotypical behavior in males, gait irregularities, and cerebellar lesions indicated that DNAN is neurotoxic. Splenic enlargement, anemia, testicular toxicity, and neurotoxicity occurred only at or near lethal doses in the subchronic study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161203
[Lr] Last revision date:161203
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 26996482
[Au] Autor:Zang ZJ; Ji SY; Zhang YN; Gao Y; Zhang B
[Ad] Address:Department of Infertility and Sexual Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630, China.
[Ti] Title:Effects of Saikokaryukotsuboreito on Spermatogenesis and Fertility in Aging Male Mice.
[So] Source:Chin Med J (Engl);129(7):846-53, 2016 Apr 05.
[Is] ISSN:0366-6999
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Aspermia caused by exogenous testosterone limit its usage in late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) patients desiring fertility. Saikokaryukotsuboreito (SKRBT) is reported to improve serum testosterone and relieve LOH-related symptoms. However, it is unclear whether SKRBT affects fertility. We aimed to examine the effects of SKRBT on spermatogenesis and fertility in aging male mice. METHODS: Thirty aging male mice were randomly assigned to three groups. Mice were orally administered with phosphate-buffer solution or SKRBT (300 mg/kg, daily) or received testosterone by subcutaneous injections (10 mg/kg, every 3 days). Thirty days later, each male mouse was mated with two female mice. All animals were sacrificed at the end of 90 days. Intratesticular testosterone (ITT) levels, quality of sperm, expression of synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3), and fertility were assayed. RESULTS: In the SKRBT-treated group, ITT, quality of sperm, and expression of SYCP3 were all improved compared with the control group (ITT: 85.50 ± 12.31 ng/g vs. 74.10 ± 11.45 ng/g, P = 0.027; sperm number: [14.94 ± 4.63] × 106 cells/ml vs. [8.79 ± 4.38] × 106 cells/ml, P = 0.002; sperm motility: 43.16 ± 9.93% vs. 33.51 ± 6.98%, P = 0.015; the number of SYCP3-positive cells/tubule: 77.50 ± 11.01 ng/ml vs. 49.30 ± 8.73 ng/ml, P < 0.001; the expression of SYCP3 protein: 1.23 ± 0.09 vs. 0.84 ± 0.10, P < 0.001), but fertility was not significantly changed (P > 0.05, respectively). In the testosterone-treated group, ITT, quality of sperm, and expression of SYCP3 were markedly lower than the control group (ITT: 59.00 ± 8.67, P = 0.005; sperm number: [4.34 ± 2.45] × 106 cells/ml, P = 0.018; sperm motility: 19.53 ± 7.69%, P = 0.001; the number of SYCP3-positive cells/tubule: 30.00 ± 11.28, P < 0.001; the percentage of SYCP3-positive tubules/section 71.98 ± 8.88%, P = 0.001; the expression of SYCP3 protein: 0.71 ± 0.09, P < 0.001), and fertility was also suppressed (P < 0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: SKRBT had no adverse effect on fertility potential in aging male mice.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology
Fertility/drug effects
Spermatogenesis/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aging
Animals
Hypogonadism/drug therapy
Male
Mice
Nuclear Proteins/analysis
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility/drug effects
Testis/drug effects
Testis/pathology
Testosterone/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Drugs, Chinese Herbal); 0 (Nuclear Proteins); 0 (Sycp3 protein, mouse); 0 (saiko-ka-ryukotsu-borei-to); 3XMK78S47O (Testosterone)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160322
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0366-6999.178972

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[PMID]: 26940145
[Au] Autor:Ma TJ; Zhang XJ; Ding XP; Chen HH; Zhang YW; Ding M
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Bio-Resources and Eco-Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Life Science, Institute of Medical Genetics, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
[Ti] Title:Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in UBR2 gene with idiopathic aspermia or oligospermia in Sichuan, China.
[So] Source:Andrologia;48(10):1253-1260, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0272
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The associations between three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs3749897, rs16895863 and rs373341) of UBR2 gene and idiopathic aspermia or oligospermia were investigated in this study by a case-control experiment with 149 fertile and 316 infertile men, including 244 patients with idiopathic aspermia and 72 patients with severe oligospermia. The time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Sequenom MassARRAY  system) was used in this study. A significant difference between the oligospermia men (oligospermia group) and the fertile men (control group) was observed in this research (odds ratio [OR]: 2.764; 95% CI: 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.171-6.525; P = 0.017), which could indicate that the combined AT-TC-CC genotype in the UBR2 gene (rs16895863, rs373341, rs3749897 respectively) is a possible risk of idiopathic oligospermia for men in Sichuan, China.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aspermia/genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Oligospermia/genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Alleles
China
Genetic Association Studies
Genotype
Humans
Male
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 2.3.2.27 (UBR2 protein, human); EC 2.3.2.27 (Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170209
[Lr] Last revision date:170209
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160305
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/and.12569

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[PMID]: 26432530
[Au] Autor:Mehta A; Sigman M
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: akanksha.mehta@emory.edu.
[Ti] Title:Management of the dry ejaculate: a systematic review of aspermia and retrograde ejaculation.
[So] Source:Fertil Steril;104(5):1074-81, 2015 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1556-5653
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A dry ejaculate (aspermia), may occur either because of an inability to transport semen (anejaculation) or because of an inability to ejaculate in an antegrade direction (retrograde ejaculation). The treatment of aspermia varies with underlying etiology and includes medical therapy with sympathomimetics, urinary sperm retrieval, bladder neck reconstruction, prostatic massage, penile vibratory stimulation, electroejaculation, and surgical sperm retrieval. A systematic review of the current literature was performed for articles on ejaculatory dysfunction related to dry ejaculate. However, the data are insufficient to allow firm comparisons between treatment options. Treatments must be tailored to the individual patient, and treatment decisions should involve consideration of ease of administration, degree of invasiveness, and anticipated success.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aspermia/therapy
Ejaculation
Fertility
Penis/innervation
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/therapy
Spermatogenesis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Aspermia/diagnosis
Aspermia/physiopathology
Humans
Male
Recovery of Function
Risk Factors
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/diagnosis
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological/physiopathology
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1602
[Cu] Class update date: 151102
[Lr] Last revision date:151102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151004
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25895794
[Au] Autor:Niederberger C
[Ti] Title:Re: Pregnancy outcome according to male diagnosis after ICSI with non-ejaculated sperm compared with ejaculated sperm controls.
[So] Source:J Urol;193(5):1606-7, 2015 May.
[Is] ISSN:1527-3792
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aspermia/diagnosis
Azoospermia/diagnosis
Ejaculation
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic
Spermatozoa
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
[Pt] Publication type:COMMENT; EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1509
[Cu] Class update date: 150421
[Lr] Last revision date:150421
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150422
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25890557
[Au] Autor:Niederberger C
[Ti] Title:Re: Pregnancy outcome according to male diagnosis after ICSI with non-ejaculated sperm compared with ejaculated sperm controls.
[So] Source:J Urol;193(4):1331-2, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1527-3792
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aspermia/diagnosis
Azoospermia/diagnosis
Ejaculation
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic
Spermatozoa
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
[Pt] Publication type:COMMENT; EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1510
[Cu] Class update date: 150420
[Lr] Last revision date:150420
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150420
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25637084
[Au] Autor:Johnston SD; Deif HH; McKinnon A; Theilemann P; Griffith JE; Higgins DP
[Ad] Address:School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, Gatton, Australia s.johnston1@uq.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Orchitis and Epididymitis in Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) Infected With Chlamydia pecorum.
[So] Source:Vet Pathol;52(6):1254-7, 2015 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1544-2217
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although Chlamydia causes disease of the urethra and prostate of male koalas, its impact on the testis and epididymis has not been examined. This study describes chronic-active and granulomatous orchitis and epididymitis with interstitial fibrosis associated with infection by Chlamydia pecorum in 2 of 18 adult male koalas being euthanized at a koala hospital, 8 of which also had chlamydial prostatitis. By immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy, chlamydial inclusions were demonstrated within Sertoli cells directly associated with mild inflammation surrounding intact seminiferous and epididymal tubules, marked pyogranulomatous inflammation around disrupted tubules, replacement of tubules by interstitial fibrosis, and aspermia. The presence of C. pecorum but not Chlamydia pneumoniae was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of formalin-fixed tissues of the left and right testes and right epididymis in 1 animal. This is the first report of orchitis and epididymitis in a koala infected with C. pecorum.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chlamydia Infections/veterinary
Chlamydia/isolation & purification
Epididymitis/veterinary
Orchitis/veterinary
Phascolarctidae/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Chlamydia/genetics
Chlamydia Infections/microbiology
Chlamydia Infections/pathology
Epididymitis/microbiology
Epididymitis/pathology
Fibrosis/microbiology
Fibrosis/pathology
Fibrosis/veterinary
Inclusion Bodies/microbiology
Inclusion Bodies/pathology
Male
Orchitis/microbiology
Orchitis/pathology
Testis/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170418
[Lr] Last revision date:170418
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0300985815570069


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