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[PMID]: 29415667
[Au] Autor:Ren Y; Chen J; Zheng Q; Chen W
[Ad] Address:School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical University, 270 Xueyuan West Road, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 325027, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:Short-term effect of a developed warming moist chamber goggle for video display terminal-associated dry eye.
[So] Source:BMC Ophthalmol;18(1):33, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2415
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Video display terminal (VDT)-associated dry eye (DE) patients are the rising group worldwide, and moisture goggles are the preferable treatment since they are capable of improving tear film stability and DE discomfort. The current study aims to evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of the developed warming moist chamber goggles (WMCGs) for VDT-associated DE patients. METHODS: In this prospective self-control study, 22 DE patients (22 eyes) working with VDTs over 4 h daily were enrolled and instructed to wear WMCGs for 15 min. Sodium hyaluronate (SH, 0.1%) eyedrops were applied as a control on another day on these same patients, however 4 subjects denied the eyedrop application. The symptomatology visual analog scale (VAS) score, tear meniscus height (TMH), noninvasive tear film break-up time (NI-BUT), tear film lipid layer thickness (LLT), and bulbar conjunctival redness were assessed with Keratograph 5 M at baseline, 5, 30 and 60 min after treatment. The WMCGs wearing comfort was also evaluated. RESULTS: The ocular discomfort evaluated by VAS decreased in the WMCGs group throughout 60 min (P<0.001), better than the control group levels (P ≤ 0.015). TMH, NI-BUT (including the first BUT and average BUT) increased than baseline level accross 60 min in the WMCG group (P ≤ 0.012), while those in the control group only showed temporary improvements in 5 min. LLT also increased obviously after WMCGs wear, while the change in the control group was nearly innoticeable. No adverse responses were detected. CONCLUSIONS: Temporary use of the WMCGs is able to relieve ocular discomfort, and improves tear film stability in DE patients for at least 1 h, making it a promising alternative to other treatments.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Asthenopia/therapy
Computer Terminals
Dry Eye Syndromes/therapy
Eye Protective Devices
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Asthenopia/etiology
Dry Eye Syndromes/etiology
Equipment Design
Female
Humans
Humidity
Lipid Metabolism/physiology
Male
Prospective Studies
Tears/physiology
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12886-018-0700-y

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[PMID]: 29302694
[Au] Autor:Gao TY; Guo CX; Babu RJ; Black JM; Bobier WR; Chakraborty A; Dai S; Hess RF; Jenkins M; Jiang Y; Kearns LS; Kowal L; Lam CSY; Pang PCK; Parag V; Pieri R; Raveendren RN; South J; Staffieri SE; Wadham A; Walker N; Thompson B; BRAVO Study Team
[Ad] Address:School of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness of a Binocular Video Game vs Placebo Video Game for Improving Visual Functions in Older Children, Teenagers, and Adults With Amblyopia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.
[So] Source:JAMA Ophthalmol;136(2):172-181, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6173
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Binocular amblyopia treatment using contrast-rebalanced stimuli showed promise in laboratory studies and requires clinical trial investigation in a home-based setting. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of a binocular video game with a placebo video game for improving visual functions in older children and adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: The Binocular Treatment of Amblyopia Using Videogames clinical trial was a multicenter, double-masked, randomized clinical trial. Between March 2014 and June 2016, 115 participants 7 years and older with unilateral amblyopia (amblyopic eye visual acuity, 0.30-1.00 logMAR; Snellen equivalent, 20/40-20/200) due to anisometropia, strabismus, or both were recruited. Eligible participants were allocated with equal chance to receive either the active or the placebo video game, with minimization stratified by age group (child, age 7 to 12 years; teenager, age 13 to 17 years; and adult, 18 years and older). Interventions: Falling-blocks video games played at home on an iPod Touch for 1 hour per day for 6 weeks. The active video game had game elements split between eyes with a dichoptic contrast offset (mean [SD] initial fellow eye contrast, 0.23 [0.14]). The placebo video game presented identical images to both eyes. Main Outcomes and Measures: Change in amblyopic eye visual acuity at 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included compliance, stereoacuity, and interocular suppression. Participants and clinicians who measured outcomes were masked to treatment allocation. Results: Of the 115 included participants, 65 (56.5%) were male and 83 (72.2%) were white, and the mean (SD) age at randomization was 21.5 (13.6) years. There were 89 participants (77.4%) who had prior occlusion. The mean (SD) amblyopic eye visual acuity improved 0.06 (0.12) logMAR from baseline in the active group (n = 56) and 0.07 (0.10) logMAR in the placebo group (n = 59). The mean treatment difference between groups, adjusted for baseline visual acuity and age group, was -0.02 logMAR (95% CI, -0.06 to 0.02; P = .25). Compliance with more than 25% of prescribed game play was achieved by 36 participants (64%) in the active group and by 49 (83%) in the placebo group. At 6 weeks, 36 participants (64%) in the active group achieved fellow eye contrast greater than 0.9 in the binocular video game. No group differences were observed for any secondary outcomes. Adverse effects included 3 reports of transient asthenopia. Conclusions and Relevance: The specific home-based binocular falling-blocks video game used in this clinical trial did not improve visual outcomes more than the placebo video game despite increases in fellow eye contrast during game play. More engaging video games with considerations for compliance may improve effectiveness. Trial Registration: anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12613001004752.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2017.6090

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[PMID]: 29409625
[Au] Autor:Antona B; Barrio AR; Gascó A; Pinar A; González-Pérez M; Puell MC
[Ad] Address:Applied Vision Research Group, Faculty of Optics and Optometry, Complutense University of Madrid, 28037 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: bantona@ucm.es.
[Ti] Title:Symptoms associated with reading from a smartphone in conditions of light and dark.
[So] Source:Appl Ergon;68:12-17, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9126
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Asthenopia symptoms were investigated in visually-normal subjects without computer-related vision symptoms after prolonged reading from: smartphone versus hardcopy under photopic conditions, and smartphone in conditions of ambient versus dark room illumination. After reading from the smartphone, total symptom scores and nine out of ten questionnaire symptoms were significantly worse than for the hardcopy ("blurred vision while viewing the text, "blurred distance vision after the task", "difficulty in refocusing from one distance to another", "irritated or burning eyes", "dry eyes", "eyestrain", "tired eyes", "sensitivity to bright lights" and "eye discomfort"). Mean total symptom scores and scores for "irritated or burning eyes" and "dry eyes" were significantly higher for the dark versus photopic conditions. In conclusion, prolonged smartphone reading could cause worse asthenopic symptoms than reading from a hardcopy under similar conditions. Symptoms could be even worse when reading from a smartphone in the dark.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29186261
[Au] Autor:Deng Q; Ding S; Yang S; Huang J
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China.
[Ti] Title:Cutaneous sarcoidosis and secondary open-angle glaucoma in a patient: case report and literature review.
[So] Source:An Bras Dermatol;92(3):407-409, 2017 May-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1806-4841
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The current report presents the case of a 41-year-old male patient with a two-month history of asthenopia and plaques in the frontotemporal region. Computed tomography revealed bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Ophthalmological examination showed elevated intraocular pressure. Skin biopsy demonstrated aa dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed mainly of epithelioid cells and a few multinucleated giant cells, but no obvious lymphocytes. Findings of thorough physical examinations and auxiliary examinations suggested the presence of cutaneous sarcoidosis and secondary open-angle glaucoma. Treatment consisted mainly of oral methylprednisolone. Skin lesions, bilateral hilar, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy resolved completely. Cutaneous sarcoidosis is often accompanied by extracutaneous organ involvement. Dermatologists must be aware of the disease's extracutaneous manifestations to ensure accurate diagnosis for further treatments.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Glaucoma, Open-Angle/etiology
Sarcoidosis/complications
Skin Diseases/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Glaucoma, Open-Angle/diagnosis
Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use
Sarcoidosis/diagnosis
Skin Diseases/diagnosis
Skin Diseases/drug therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Glucocorticoids); X4W7ZR7023 (Methylprednisolone)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180131
[Lr] Last revision date:180131
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29231331
[Au] Autor:Zhang W; Li H; Zhao N; Hai X; Dong H; Wang J
[Ad] Address:Department of Massage, the First Teaching Hospital of Tianjin University of TCM, Tianjin 300193, China.
[Ti] Title:[Bridge role of Jingming (BL 1) for VDT asthenopia and brainfag based on human instinct].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Zhen Jiu;37(1):85-87, 2017 Jan 12.
[Is] ISSN:0255-2930
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To explore the bridge role of Jingming (BL 1) for video display terminal (VDT) asthenopia and brainfag. Ancient literature and modern scientific research on the acupoint have been analyzed and summarized so as to explore pressing the acupoint the instinct feedback of brain after asthenopia. It is demonstrated that Jingming (BL 1) is a key channel between eyes, brain and the outside world, and it is one of major feedback points of brain after asthenopia. In this paper we try to establish a new research thinking and ascertain it, namely Jingming (BL 1) reflecting the relationship between asthenopia and brainfag. We hope that it can provide some references for further research on cognizing brain through eye.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171212
[Lr] Last revision date:171212
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.13703/j.0255-2930.2017.01.022

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[PMID]: 29088284
[Au] Autor:Stack RJ; Southworth S; Fisher BA; Barone F; Buckley CD; Rauz S; Bowman SJ
[Ad] Address:Centre for Translational Inflammation Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:A qualitative exploration of physical, mental and ocular fatigue in patients with primary Sjögren's Syndrome.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0187272, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) affects exocrine glands such as those producing the tear film, leading to dry and painful eyes, but is also associated with fatigue. The experience of fatigue in pSS, and its relationship with sicca symptoms, is poorly understood. METHODS: Twenty people diagnosed with pSS were recruited to participate in a semi-structured qualitative interview about their symptoms experience. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: People with pSS described physical tiredness, mental fatigue and ocular fatigue. Mental fatigue was characterised by difficulties in attention, particularly, the ability to follow conversations and short-term memory problems. Participants linked their experience of fatigue to feeling of depression, frustration, irritation and anxiety, and therefore, fatigue was suggested to have had a large impact on their psychological well-being. People with pSS also described a range of ocular symptoms including pain, dryness, and itching, which were compounded by fatigue. For some, eye fatigue was pervasive, and daily activities involving the eyes such as reading, using the computer and driving were impaired. In some cases, the level of ocular discomfort was so severe it prevented sleep, which in turn impacted on general fatigue levels. CONCLUSIONS: People with pSS experience fatigue in a range of ways; physical, mental and ocular fatigue were described. Fatigue was suggested to exacerbate other ocular symptoms, posed serious physical limitations and caused psychological distress. Further research into the nature of fatigue and ocular symptoms in pSS is required.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Asthenopia/etiology
Fatigue/etiology
Sjogren´s Syndrome/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171113
[Lr] Last revision date:171113
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171101
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0187272

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[PMID]: 28914003
[Au] Autor:Kim DJ; Lim CY; Gu N; Park CY
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Visual Fatigue Induced by Viewing a Tablet Computer with a High-resolution Display.
[So] Source:Korean J Ophthalmol;31(5):388-393, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2092-9382
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: In the present study, the visual discomfort induced by smart mobile devices was assessed in normal and healthy adults. METHODS: Fifty-nine volunteers (age, 38.16 ± 10.23 years; male : female = 19 : 40) were exposed to tablet computer screen stimuli (iPad Air, Apple Inc.) for 1 hour. Participants watched a movie or played a computer game on the tablet computer. Visual fatigue and discomfort were assessed using an asthenopia questionnaire, tear film break-up time, and total ocular wavefront aberration before and after viewing smart mobile devices. RESULTS: Based on the questionnaire, viewing smart mobile devices for 1 hour significantly increased mean total asthenopia score from 19.59 ± 8.58 to 22.68 ± 9.39 (p < 0.001). Specifically, the scores for five items (tired eyes, sore/aching eyes, irritated eyes, watery eyes, and hot/burning eye) were significantly increased by viewing smart mobile devices. Tear film break-up time significantly decreased from 5.09 ± 1.52 seconds to 4.63 ± 1.34 seconds (p = 0.003). However, total ocular wavefront aberration was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Visual fatigue and discomfort were significantly induced by viewing smart mobile devices, even though the devices were equipped with state-of-the-art display technology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Asthenopia/etiology
Blinking/physiology
Computers, Handheld
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Asthenopia/diagnosis
Asthenopia/physiopathology
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tears/metabolism
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170916
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3341/kjo.2016.0095

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[PMID]: 28861353
[Au] Autor:Zhao HL; Jiang J; Yu J; Xu HM
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital, Hangzhou 310014, Zhejiang Province, China.
[Ti] Title:Role of short-wavelength filtering lenses in delaying myopia progression and amelioration of asthenopia in juveniles.
[So] Source:Int J Ophthalmol;10(8):1261-1267, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2222-3959
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To evaluate the positive effects of blue-violet light filtering lenses in delaying myopia and relieving asthenopia in juveniles. METHODS: Sixty ametropia juveniles (aged range, 11-15y) were randomized into two groups: the test group (30 children, 60 eyes), wearing blue-violet light filtering lenses; and the control group (30 children, 60 eyes), wearing ordinary aspherical lenses. Baseline refractive power of the affected eyes and axial length of the two groups was recorded. After 1-year, the patients underwent contrast sensitivity (glare and non-glare under bright and dark conditions), accommodation-related testing, asthenopia questionnaire assessment, and adverse reaction questionnaire assessment. RESULTS: After 1y of wearing the filtering lenses, changes in refractive power and axial length were not significantly different between the two groups ( >0.05). Under bright conditions, the contrast sensitivities at low and medium-frequency grating (vision angles of 6.3°, 4.0°, and 2.5°) with glare in the test group were significantly higher than in the control group ( <0.05), while the contrast sensitivity at low-frequency grating (vision angles of 6.3° and 4.0°) in the absence of glare in the test group was higher than in the control group ( <0.05). Under glare and non-glare dark conditions, the contrast sensitivities of various frequencies in the test group did not show significant differences compared with those in the control group ( >0.05). In the test group, the amplitude of accommodation, accommodative lag, and accommodative sensitivity of patients wearing glasses for 6 and 12mo were significantly elevated ( <0.05), while the asthenopia gratings were significantly decreased ( <0.05). Nevertheless, in the control group, the amplitude of accommodation, accommodative lag, and accommodative sensitivity after 12mo were not significantly altered compared with baseline ( >0.05), and the asthenopia grating was not significantly decreased ( >0.05). In addition, after wearing glasses for 6 to 12mo, the asthenopia grating of patients in the test group decreased significantly compared with the control group ( <0.05). At 12mo, the constituent ratio of adverse reactions did not show significant difference between the two groups ( >0.05). CONCLUSION: A 1-year follow-up reveal that compare with ordinary glasses, short-wavelength filtering lenses (blue/violet-light filters) increase the low- and medium-frequency contrast sensitivity under bright conditions and improved accommodation. They effectively relieved asthenopia without severe adverse reactions, suggesting potential for clinical application. However, no significant advantages in terms of refractive power or axial length progression were found compared with ordinary aspheric lenses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170903
[Lr] Last revision date:170903
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.18240/ijo.2017.08.13

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[PMID]: 28850642
[Au] Autor:Rechichi C; De Mojà G; Aragona P
[Ti] Title:Video Game Vision Syndrome: A New Clinical Picture in Children?
[So] Source:J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus;54(6):346-355, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2405
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To examine a possible relationship between exposure to video games/electronic screens and visual issues in children between 3 and 10 years of age. METHODS: An observational, cross-sectional study of a population of children using video games was employed. All patients between 3 and 10 years of age were recruited at an outpatient unit accredited by the Italian Regional Health Service. Three hundred twenty children (159 boys and 161 girls; mean age = 6.9 ± 2 years) were observed. Ophthalmological examination included assessment of stereoscopic vision on Lang-Stereotests I and II (LANG-STEREOTEST AG, Küsnacht, Switzerland) and identification of the dominant eye using the Dolman method. Furthermore, a questionnaire was used to record asthenopic symptoms and daily exposure to video games and electronic screens. Two groups of children were examined according to the average amount of time spent playing video games daily: children who played video games for less than 30 minutes per day and not every day (control group) and children who played video games for 30 minutes or more every day (video game group). Both groups were then divided into two subgroups: children using other types of electronic screens (eg, televisions, computers, tablets, and smartphones) for less than 3 hours daily (low electronic use subgroup) and children using other types of electronic screens for 3 hours or more per day (high electronic use subgroup). RESULTS: Asthenopia (especially headache, eyelid tic, transient diplopia, and dizziness), absence of fine stereopsis, and refractive errors were statistically more frequent (mainly in the dominant eye) in children in the video game group. CONCLUSIONS: These symptoms were frequent and peculiar in the video game group and might be part of a video game vision syndrome that has not been defined yet. It is important to recognize these signs as possible functional disorders to avoid erroneous diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54(6):346-355.].
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171120
[Lr] Last revision date:171120
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3928/01913913-20170510-01

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[PMID]: 28774524
[Au] Autor:Mikhail M; Flanders M
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Que.
[Ti] Title:Clinical profiles and surgical outcomes of adult esotropia.
[So] Source:Can J Ophthalmol;52(4):403-408, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1715-3360
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical features and surgical outcomes of teenage and adult patients with esotropia undergoing strabismus surgery with adjustable sutures. METHODS: Seventy-three patients were included in this retrospective, cohort study. Patients were stratified into group 1 (35 with childhood-onset esotropia [CET]) and group 2 (38 with adult-onset esophoria-tropia [EPT]). Preoperative immediate, 2-week, and 4-6-month postoperative measurements of ocular alignment, as well as fusional testing, were performed. Postoperative success was defined as distant (6 m) and near (33 cm) alignment within 12 prism diopters (PDs) of orthotropia in the primary position at 2 weeks and at 4-6 months with a single surgery. RESULTS: Patients with CET more frequently had hyperopia and amblyopia and were more likely to present for surgery because of psychosocial strabismus-related problems. Patients with EPT predominantly had myopia and were more likely to experience diplopia and asthenopia. In group 1, the mean preoperative distance deviation improved from 30 PDs to 4 PDs at 2 weeks and to 4 PDs at 4-6 months (p < 0.001). In group 2, mean preoperative distance alignment improved from 22 to 3 PDs at 2 weeks and to 3 PDs at 4-6 months (p < 0.001). The mean objective, single-surgery success rate at 2 weeks was 88% and 97% in groups 1 and 2, respectively. At 4-6 months, postoperative success was 71% in group 1 and 80% in group 2. The majority of patients reported subjective improvement. CONCLUSIONS: There are distinct preoperative differences between CET and EPT patients. Adjustable, strabismus surgery in this cohort is safe and effective in achieving subjective and objective success.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Esotropia/surgery
Eye Movements/physiology
Oculomotor Muscles/surgery
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/methods
Suture Techniques/instrumentation
Sutures
Vision, Binocular
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oculomotor Muscles/physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Visual Acuity
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170805
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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