Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Atrophy [Words]
References found : 119606 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 11961 go to page                         

  1 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29099351
[Au] Autor:Wang AC; Ibrahim GM; Poliakov AV; Wang PI; Fallah A; Mathern GW; Buckley RT; Collins K; Weil AG; Shurtleff HA; Warner MH; Perez FA; Shaw DW; Wright JN; Saneto RP; Novotny EJ; Lee A; Browd SR; Ojemann JG
[Ad] Address:Departments of 1 Neurosurgery and.
[Ti] Title:Corticospinal tract atrophy and motor fMRI predict motor preservation after functional cerebral hemispherectomy.
[So] Source:J Neurosurg Pediatr;:1-9, 2017 Nov 03.
[Is] ISSN:1933-0715
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE The potential loss of motor function after cerebral hemispherectomy is a common cause of anguish for patients, their families, and their physicians. The deficits these patients face are individually unique, but as a whole they provide a framework to understand the mechanisms underlying cortical reorganization of motor function. This study investigated whether preoperative functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) could predict the postoperative preservation of hand motor function. METHODS Thirteen independent reviewers analyzed sensorimotor fMRI and colored fractional anisotropy (CoFA)-DTI maps in 25 patients undergoing functional hemispherectomy for treatment of intractable seizures. Pre- and postoperative gross hand motor function were categorized and correlated with fMRI and DTI findings, specifically, abnormally located motor activation on fMRI and corticospinal tract atrophy on DTI. RESULTS Normal sensorimotor cortical activation on preoperative fMRI was significantly associated with severe decline in postoperative motor function, demonstrating 92.9% sensitivity (95% CI 0.661-0.998) and 100% specificity (95% CI 0.715-1.00). Bilaterally robust, symmetric corticospinal tracts on CoFA-DTI maps were significantly associated with severe postoperative motor decline, demonstrating 85.7% sensitivity (95% CI 0.572-0.982) and 100% specificity (95% CI 0.715-1.00). Interpreting the fMR images, the reviewers achieved a Fleiss' kappa coefficient (κ) for interrater agreement of κ = 0.69, indicating good agreement (p < 0.01). When interpreting the CoFA-DTI maps, the reviewers achieved κ = 0.64, again indicating good agreement (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Functional hemispherectomy offers a high potential for seizure freedom without debilitating functional deficits in certain instances. Patients likely to retain preoperative motor function can be identified prior to hemispherectomy, where fMRI or DTI suggests that cortical reorganization of motor function has occurred prior to the operation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.3171/2017.7.PEDS17137

  2 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29099279
[Au] Autor:Liang Z; Zhang L; Su H; Luan R; Na N; Sun L; Zhao Y; Zhang X; Zhang Q; Li J; Zhang L; Zhao Y
[Ad] Address:a State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing , China.
[Ti] Title:MTOR signaling is essential for the development of thymic epithelial cells and the induction of central immune tolerance.
[So] Source:Autophagy;:0, 2017 Nov 03.
[Is] ISSN:1554-8635
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are critical for the establishment and maintenance of appropriate microenvironment for the positive and negative selection of thymocytes and the induction of central immune tolerance. Yet, little about the molecular regulatory network on TEC development and function is understood. Here, we demonstrate that MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin [serine/threonine kinase]) is essential for proper development and functional maturation of TECs. Pharmacological inhibition of MTOR activity by rapamycin (RPM) causes severe thymic atrophy and reduction of TECs. TEC-specific deletion of Mtor causes the severe reduction of mTECs, the blockage of thymocyte differentiation and output, the reduced generation of thymic regulatory T (Treg) cells and the impaired expression of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) including Fabp2, Ins1, Tff3 and Chrna1 molecules. Importantly, specific deletion of Mtor in TECs causes autoimmune diseases characterized by enhanced tissue immune cell infiltration and the presence of autoreactive antibodies. Mechanistically, Mtor deletion causes overdegradation of CTNNB1/Beta-Catenin due to excessive autophagy and the attenuation of WNT (wingless-type MMTV integration site family) signaling in TECs. Selective inhibition of autophagy significantly rescued the poor mTEC development caused by Mtor deficiency. Altogether, MTOR is essential for TEC development and maturation by regulating proliferation and WNT signaling activity through autophagy. The present study also implies that long-term usage of RPM might increase the risk of autoimmunity by impairing TEC maturation and function.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/15548627.2017.1376161

  3 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29099150
[Au] Autor:Urbina MT; Benjamin I; Medina R; Jiménez J; Trías L; Lerner J
[Ad] Address:Unifertes Fertility Unit, Caracas, Venezuela.
[Ti] Title:Expanded carrier screening in gamete donors of Venezuela.
[So] Source:JBRA Assist Reprod;, 2017 Nov 03.
[Is] ISSN:1518-0557
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To discuss the implications of expanded genetic carrier screening for preconception purposes based on our practice. METHODS: One hundred and forty-three potential gamete donors aged 20-32 years old (µ=24, 127 females and 16 males), signed informed consent forms and were selected according to the REDLARA guidelines. Blood or saliva samples were examined by one of these genetic carrier screening methods: Genzyme screening for Cystic Fibrosis (CF), Fragile X and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA); Counsyl Universal panel or Recombine Carrier Map. RESULTS: Genotyping results for all donors were analyzed; 41% (58/143) of donors were identified as carriers for at least one condition. We found a carrier frequency of 1/24 for CF, 1/72 for SMA and 0/120 for Fragile X syndrome. Among the high-impact most prevalent conditions in our study (Carrier Map group) were: 21-Hydroxilase-Deficient Congenital Nonclassical Adrenal Hyperplasia (1/8), Factor V deficiency (1/12), Hemochromatosis: Type 1: HFE Related (1/12), Short Chain Acyl-CoA (1/14) and MTHFR deficiency 1/3 (39%). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of gamete donors identified as carriers of at least one condition was 41%, which supports the offering of expanded carrier screening to our population. Studies in Latin American populations could help customize screening panels. The ART patient population has a unique opportunity to be offered expanded carrier screening and appropriate counseling, to make its best-informed decisions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.5935/1518-0557.20170062

  4 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29098660
[Au] Autor:Ramos-Hryb AB; Pazini FL; Kaster MP; Rodrigues ALS
[Ad] Address:Department of Biochemistry, Center for Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, 88040-900, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Therapeutic Potential of Ursolic Acid to Manage Neurodegenerative and Psychiatric Diseases.
[So] Source:CNS Drugs;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1179-1934
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ursolic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in several plants. Despite its initial use as a pharmacologically inactive emulsifier in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries, several biological activities have been reported for this compound so far, including anti-tumoural, anti-diabetic, cardioprotective and hepatoprotective properties. The biological effects of ursolic acid have been evaluated in vitro, in different cell types and against several toxic insults (i.e. 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, amyloid-ß peptides, kainic acid and others); in animal models of brain-related disorders (Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, depression, traumatic brain injury) and ageing; and in clinical studies with cancer patients and for muscle atrophy. Most of the protective effects of ursolic acid are related to its ability to prevent oxidative damage and excessive inflammation, common mechanisms associated with multiple brain disorders. Additionally, ursolic acid is capable of modulating the monoaminergic system, an effect that might be involved in its ability to prevent mood and cognitive dysfunctions associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. This review presents and discusses the available evidence of the possible beneficial effects of ursolic acid for the management of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. We also discuss the chemical features, major sources and potential limitations of the use of ursolic acid as a pharmacological treatment for brain-related diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40263-017-0474-4

  5 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29097597
[Au] Autor:Parent MJ; Zimmer ER; Shin M; Kang MS; Fonov VS; Mathieu A; Aliaga A; Kostikov A; Do Carmo S; Dea D; Poirier J; Soucy JP; Gauthier S; Cuello AC; Rosa-Neto P
[Ad] Address:McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Multimodal imaging in rat model recapitulates Alzheimer's Disease biomarkers abnormalities.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Imaging biomarkers are frequently proposed as endpoints for clinical trials targeting brain amyloidosis in Alzheimer's Disease (AD); however, the specific impact of amyloid-ß (Aß) aggregation on biomarker abnormalities remains elusive in AD. Using the McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rat as a model of selective Aß pathology, we characterized the longitudinal progression of abnormalities in biomarkers commonly used in AD research. Middle-aged (9-11 months) transgenic animals (both male and female) displayed mild spatial memory impairments and disrupted cingulate network connectivity measured by resting-state fMRI, even in the absence of hypometabolism (measured with PET [ F]FDG) or detectable fibrillary amyloidosis (measured with PET [ F]NAV4694). At more advanced ages (16-19 months), cognitive deficits progressed in conjunction with resting connectivity abnormalities; furthermore, hypometabolism, Aß plaques accumulation, reduction of CSF Aß concentrations and hippocampal atrophy (structural MRI) were detectable at this stage. The present results emphasises the early impact of Aß on brain connectivity and support a framework in which persistent Aß aggregation itself is sufficient to impose memory circuits dysfunction, which propagates to adjacent brain networks at later stages. The present study proposes a "back-translation" of the Alzheimer pathological cascade concept, from human to animals. To do so, we used the same set of Alzheimer imaging biomarkers typically used in large human cohorts and assessed their progression over time in a transgenic rat model, which allows for a finer spatial resolution not attainable with mice. Using this translational platform, we demonstrated that Aß pathology recapitulates an Alzheimer-like profile of biomarker abnormalities, even in the absence of other hallmarks of the disease such as neurofibrillary tangles and widespread neuronal losses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29097267
[Au] Autor:Niada F; Tabin R; Kayemba-Kay's S
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics and Neonatal Medicine, Centre Hospitalier du Valais Romand, Sion, Switzerland; Service de Pédiatrie, CHU Yalgado Ouédraogo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
[Ti] Title:Spontaneous neonatal renal vein thromboses: Should we treat them all? A report of five cases and a literature review.
[So] Source:Pediatr Neonatol;, 2017 Oct 09.
[Is] ISSN:2212-1692
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is a rare but well-known neonatal entity for which several therapeutic modalities are reported in the literature because of the lack of consensus management guidelines. POPULATION AND METHODS: A retrospective study of the medical records of children managed between January 1990 and December 2013, and whose final diagnosis was RVT. The diagnosis was initially clinical and subsequently confirmed by the abdominal ultrasonography (AUS) and Doppler imaging if necessary. The abdominal CT scan was performed when the AUS finding led to the suspicion of RVT extension to the inferior vena cava (IVC). Each patient's birth parameters (birth weight [BW], birth length [BL], and head circumference [HC]) and modalities were recorded. The treatment modalities, the outcome at follow-up along with results of etiological screening were also recorded. RESULTS: Five newborn infants were diagnosed as having unilateral RVT at the mean postnatal age of 3.8 days (range, 1-11 days). All presented with a classical triad associated nephromegaly, thrombocytopenia, and gross hematuria. Two patients had genetic thrombophilic risk factors (1 heterozygous Leiden factor V mutation in case 4, and Activated Protein C resistance in case 5). Two infants were managed conservatively, and the other three received antithrombotic treatment (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and heparin). All five patients had a similar course, leading to non-functioning renal atrophy, despite aggressive thrombolytic therapy or conservative treatment. CONCLUSION: We suggest that simple unilateral RVT be managed conservatively, while antithrombotic therapy may be attempted for unilateral RVT extending into the inferior vena cava and for bilateral RVT.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29097166
[Au] Autor:Soininen H; Solomon A; Visser PJ; Hendrix SB; Blennow K; Kivipelto M; Hartmann T; LipiDiDiet clinical study group
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Neurocenter, Department of Neurology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Electronic address: hilkka.soininen@uef.fi.
[Ti] Title:24-month intervention with a specific multinutrient in people with prodromal Alzheimer's disease (LipiDiDiet): a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial.
[So] Source:Lancet Neurol;, 2017 Oct 30.
[Is] ISSN:1474-4465
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor in Alzheimer's disease. Previous trials of the multinutrient Fortasyn Connect showed benefits in mild Alzheimer's disease dementia. LipiDiDiet investigated the effects of Fortasyn Connect on cognition and related measures in prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report the 24-month results of the trial. METHODS: LipiDiDiet was a 24-month randomised, controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, multicentre trial (11 sites in Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden), with optional 12-month double-blind extensions. The trial enrolled individuals with prodromal Alzheimer's disease, defined according to the International Working Group (IWG)-1 criteria. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to active product (125 mL once-a-day drink containing Fortasyn Connect) or control product. Randomisation was computer-generated centrally in blocks of four, stratified by site. All study personnel and participants were masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was change in a neuropsychological test battery (NTB) score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat. Safety analyses included all participants who consumed at least one study product dose. This trial is registered with the Dutch Trial Register, number NTR1705. FINDINGS: Between April 20, 2009, and July 3, 2013, 311 of 382 participants screened were randomly assigned to the active group (n=153) or control group (n=158). Mean change in NTB primary endpoint was -0·028 (SD 0·453) in the active group and -0·108 (0·528) in the control group; estimated mean treatment difference was 0·098 (95% CI -0·041 to 0·237; p=0·166). The decline in the control group was less than the prestudy estimate of -0·4 during 24 months. 66 (21%) participants dropped out of the study. Serious adverse events occurred in 34 (22%) participants in the active group and 30 (19%) in control group (p=0·487), none of which were regarded as related to the study intervention. INTERPRETATION: The intervention had no significant effect on the NTB primary endpoint over 2 years in prodromal Alzheimer's disease. However, cognitive decline in this population was much lower than expected, rendering the primary endpoint inadequately powered. Group differences on secondary endpoints of disease progression measuring cognition and function and hippocampal atrophy were observed. Further study of nutritional approaches with larger sample sizes, longer duration, or a primary endpoint more sensitive in this pre-dementia population, is needed. FUNDING: European Commission 7th Framework Programme.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29097135
[Au] Autor:Sadeh M; Dabby R
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Wolfson Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Holon, Israel. Electronic address: mesadeh@post.tau.ac.il.
[Ti] Title:Apparent C8-T1 radiculopathy with hand weakness due to mid-cervical spondylosis.
[So] Source:J Clin Neurosci;, 2017 Oct 30.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2653
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hand weakness and wasting in the setting of mid-cervical spondylosis and disc herniation without radiological evidence for compression of the C8 or T1 roots has been rarely reported. We retrospectively studied the data of patients with hand weakness and mid-cervical spondylosis. The clinical and radiological findings were compared to a control group of patients with weakness of the arm or forearm muscles and similar mid-cervical spondylosis. We found 19 patients with weakness and atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles, and 13 patients with weakness proximal to the hand muscles to serve as a control group. Eleven patients (58%) had lower limb hyperreflexia or Babinski sign. Nine patients (47%) had compression of the C7 root, 12 patients (63%) had compression of C6, 8 patients (42%) had compression of C5, and 2 patients (11%) had compression of the root C4. In all but three patients (84%), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cord compression. In the control group, five patients (38%) showed hyperreflexia of the lower limbs and Babinski sign. Five patients (38%) had compression of the C7 root, eight patients (62%) had compression of C6, and twelve patients (92%) had compression of C5. Cord compression was found in eight patients (62%). Hand muscle weakness and wasting due to mid-cervical spondylosis seems to be more common than usually believed. The lack of clinical-radiological correlation should not mislead the clinician from the correct diagnosis, and should not delay the surgical decompression of the cord and the roots.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29097134
[Au] Autor:Fangsaad T; Assawabumrungkul S; Visudtibhan A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Bhumubol Adulyadej Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Electronic address: thitiporn_f@rtaf.mi.th.
[Ti] Title:Clinical course and long-term outcome in children with alteration of consciousness underwent continuous EEG monitoring: A prospective observational study in Thailand.
[So] Source:J Clin Neurosci;, 2017 Oct 30.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2653
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The study aims to explore the clinical course and long-term outcome in children with altered consciousness who underwent cEEG monitoring. A prospective observational study was conducted in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units from 1 September 2014 through 31 March 2017. Standard 10-20 cEEG monitoring was applied. Twenty children were included in this study. Their ages ranged from 1 day to 142.7 months (median age 40.6 months). Continuous EEG was commenced from 5 h to 5 days after the onset of alteration of consciousness (median 40.2 h). The range of EEG monitoring duration was 6.7-256.3 h (mean 50.4 h). Four patients (20%) had preexisting neurological diseases, which were 2 epilepsy, adrenoleukodystrophy and unknown cause of brain atrophy. Eleven patients (55%) had principle neurological diagnosis and the others 9 (45%) had systemic illnesses. Sixteen patients (80%) had clinical seizures prior to the commencement of cEEG monitoring. Fifteen patients (75%) received antiepileptic drugs before cEEG monitoring. NCSE was diagnosed in 25%. Comparison of patients' characteristics and long-term outcome between the NCSE and non NCSE groups, there was statistical significance between the two groups only with respect to epileptiform discharges. The patients are being follow up for a period of 24 months after the end of cEEG monitoring. The outcome of patients divided into those with a favorable outcome and those with poor outcome according to modified Rankin scale. The patients with isoelectric EEG background had relatively poorer outcomes than those with normal or slow background activities. The overall mortality rate for the entire population was 15%.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 119606 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29096697
[Au] Autor:Howell JC; Watts KD; Parker MW; Wu J; Kollhoff A; Wingo TS; Dorbin CD; Qiu D; Hu WT
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, 615 Michael Street, 505F, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.
[Ti] Title:Race modifies the relationship between cognition and Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers.
[So] Source:Alzheimers Res Ther;9(1):88, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1758-9193
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: African Americans have been reported to have a higher prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than Caucasians, but etiology-specific AD biomarkers have not been systematically analyzed in older African Americans. Coexisting cerebrovascular disease may also contribute to this increased prevalence. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of amyloid, neurodegeneration, and endothelial dysfunction would differ between older African Americans and Caucasians with normal cognition and cognitive impairment associated with AD. METHODS: We prospectively recruited 135 older Americans to undergo detailed clinical, neuropsychological, genetic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CSF analysis from 2013 to 2015 at Emory University (Atlanta, GA, USA). We compared levels of CSF markers for ß-amyloid (Aß42, Aß40), total and phosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau , respectively), endothelial dysfunction (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1), α-synuclein, and neurodegeneration (neurofilament light chain [NfL]), as well as MRI markers, for hippocampal atrophy and cerebrovascular disease (white matter hyperintensity [WMH] volume). RESULTS: Sixty-five older African Americans (average age, 69.1 years) and 70 older Caucasians (average age, 70.8 years) were included. After adjusting for demographic variables, AD risk alleles, and cognitive function, older African Americans had lower CSF levels of p-tau (difference of 7.4 pg/ml; 95% CI, 3.7-11.2 pg/ml; p < 0.001), t-tau (difference of 23.6 pg/ml; 95% CI, 9.5-37.7; p = 0.001), and Aß40 (difference of 1.35 ng/ml; 95% CI, 0.29-2.42 ng/ml; p = 0.013) despite similar levels of Aß42, NfL, WMH volume, and hippocampal volume. Cognitively impaired African Americans also had lower CSF t-tau/Aß42 (difference of 0.255 per 1-SD change in composite cognition; 95% CI, 0.100-0.409; p = 0.001) and p-tau /Aß42 (difference of 0.076 per 1-SD change in composite cognition; 95% CI, 0.031-0.122; p = 0.001). These could not be explained by measured biomarkers of non-AD processes, but African Americans may be more susceptible than Caucasians to the cognitive effects of WMH. CONCLUSIONS: Despite comparable levels of CSF Aß42 and Aß42/Aß40, cognitive impairment in African Americans is associated with smaller changes in CSF tau markers but greater impact from similar WMH burden than Caucasians. Race-associated differences in CSF tau markers and ratios may lead to underdiagnosis of AD in African Americans. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02089555 . Retrospectively registered on 14 March 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13195-017-0315-1


page 1 of 11961 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information