Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Azoospermia [Words]
References found : 5746 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 575 go to page                         

  1 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29306927
[Au] Autor:Yao R; Yu D; Wang J; Wang X; Shen Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Genetics and Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:A rare unbalanced Y:autosome translocation in a Turner syndrome patient.
[So] Source:J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab;31(3):349-353, 2018 Mar 28.
[Is] ISSN:2191-0251
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Y:autosome translocations are reported to be associated with male infertility and azoospermia. Female cases with Y:autosome translocation are extremely rare. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a unique case of a rare unbalanced translocation t(Y;13) in a 12-year-old girl with Turner syndrome. Combined cytogenetic testing helped to demonstrate the detail of rare chromosomal structural rearrangement in this patient. CONCLUSIONS: The presented case showed femaleness phenotype and failure of masculinization with presence of Y chromosome and the SRY gene. She was treated with growth hormone (GH) therapy after confirming the presence of only female internal gonad with laparoscopy.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29398481
[Au] Autor:Zhao Y; Ye S; Liang D; Wang P; Fu J; Ma Q; Kong R; Shi L; Gong X; Chen W; Ding W; Yang W; Zhu Z; Chen H; Sun X; Zhu J; Li Z; Wang Y
[Ad] Address:Shanghai Key Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences and School of Life Sciences, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241, China.
[Ti] Title:In Vitro Modeling of Human Germ Cell Development Using Pluripotent Stem Cells.
[So] Source:Stem Cell Reports;10(2):509-523, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:2213-6711
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Due to differences across species, the mechanisms of cell fate decisions determined in mice cannot be readily extrapolated to humans. In this study, we developed a feeder- and xeno-free culture protocol that efficiently induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into PLZF+/GPR125+/CD90+ spermatogonium-like cells (SLCs). These SLCs were enriched with key genes in germ cell development such as MVH, DAZL, GFRα1, NANOS3, and DMRT1. In addition, a small fraction of SLCs went through meiosis in vitro to develop into haploid cells. We further demonstrated that this chemically defined induction protocol faithfully recapitulated the features of compromised germ cell development of PSCs with NANOS3 deficiency or iPSC lines established from patients with non-obstructive azoospermia. Taken together, we established a powerful experimental platform to investigate human germ cell development and pathology related to male infertility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29514896
[Au] Autor:Andreassen M; Juul A; Feldt-Rasmussen U; Joergensen N
[Ad] Address:M Andreassen, Department of Endocrinology , Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital , 2100 Copenhagen , Denmark mikkel.andreassen.01@regionh.dk.
[Ti] Title:Semen quality in patients with pituitary disease and adult-onset hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.
[So] Source:Endocr Connect;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2049-3614
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)) are released from the pituitary gland and stimulate Leydig cells to produce testosterone and initiates spermatogenesis. Little is known about how and when the deterioration of semen quality occurs in patients with adult onset gonadotropin insufficiency Design and methods: A retrospective study comprising 20 testosterone deficient men (median age 29 years) with acquired pituitary disease, who delivered semen for cryopreservation before initiation of testosterone therapy. Semen variables and hormone concentrations were compared to those of young healthy men (n=340) Results: Thirteen of 20 patients (65%) and 82% of controls had total sperm counts above 39 million and progressive motile spermatozoa above 32% (p=0.05). For the individual semen variables there were no significant differences in semen volume (median (intraquartile range)) 3.0 (1.3-6.8) vs. 3.2 (2.3-4.3) mL, p=0.47), sperm concentration 41 (11-71) vs. 43 (22-73) mill/mL (p=0.56) or total sperm counts (p=0.66). One patient had azoospermia. Patients vs. controls had lower serum testosterone 5.4 (2.2-7.6) vs. 19.7 (15.5-24.5) nmol/L (p=0.001), calculated free testosterone (cfT) 145 (56-183) vs. 464 (359-574) pmol/L (p<0.001), LH 1.5 (1.1-2.1) vs. 3.1 (2.3-4.0) U/L (p=0.002), and inhibin b (p<0.001). Levels of FSH were similar (p=0.63). Testosterone/LH ratio and cfT/LH ratio were reduced in patients (both p<0.001) Conclusions Despite Leydig cell insufficiency in patients with acquired pituitary insufficiency, the majority presented with normal semen quality based on determination of the number of progressively motile spermatozoa. In addition, the data suggest reduced LH bioactivity in patients with pituitary insufficiency.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29240891
[Au] Autor:Al-Agha AE; Ahmed IA; Nuebel E; Moriwaki M; Moore B; Peacock KA; Mosbruger T; Neklason DW; Jorde LB; Yandell M; Welt CK
[Ad] Address:Pediatric Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:Primary Ovarian Insufficiency and Azoospermia in Carriers of a Homozygous PSMC3IP Stop Gain Mutation.
[So] Source:J Clin Endocrinol Metab;103(2):555-563, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Context: The etiology of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) remains unknown in most cases. Objective: We sought to identify the genes causing POI. Design: The study was a familial genetic study. Setting: The study was performed at two academic institutions. Patients: We identified a consanguineous Yemeni family in which four daughters had POI. A brother had azoospermia. Intervention: DNA was subjected to whole genome sequencing. Shared regions of homozygosity were identified using Truploidy and prioritized using the Variant Annotation, Analysis, and Search Tool with control data from 387 healthy subjects. Imaging and quantification of protein localization and mitochondrial function were examined in cell lines. Main Outcome: Homozygous recessive gene variants shared by the four sisters. Results: The sisters shared a homozygous stop gain mutation in exon 6 of PSMC3IP (c.489 C>G, p.Tyr163Ter) and a missense variant in exon 1 of CLPP (c.100C>T, p.Pro34Ser). The affected brother also carried the homozygous PSMC3IP mutation. Functional studies demonstrated mitochondrial fragmentation in cells infected with the CLPP mutation. However, no abnormality was found in mitochondrial targeting or respiration. Conclusions: The PSMC3IP mutation provides additional evidence that mutations in meiotic homologous recombination and DNA repair genes result in distinct female and male reproductive phenotypes, including delayed puberty and primary amenorrhea caused by POI (XX gonadal dysgenesis) in females but isolated azoospermia with normal pubertal development in males. The findings also suggest that the N-terminal missense mutation in CLPP does not cause substantial mitochondrial dysfunction or contribute to ovarian insufficiency in an oligogenic manner.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1210/jc.2017-01966

  5 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29511156
[Au] Autor:An G; Zou Z; Flannigan R; Liu J; Du H; Fu X; Guo F; Zhang W
[Ad] Address:Reproductive Medicine Center, Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China (mainland).
[Ti] Title:Outcome of Oocyte Vitrification Combined with Microdissection Testicular Sperm Extraction and Aspiration for Assisted Reproduction in Men.
[So] Source:Med Sci Monit;24:1379-1386, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1643-3750
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND As a safety and efficacy protocol, oocyte vitrification has been widely used in IVF treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ICSI-ET utilizing vitrified oocytes with sperm obtained from non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) patients via micro-TESE. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 150 NOA patients underwent micro-TESE. Ten patients were unable to ejaculate and refused to accept TESA at the time of oocyte retrieval; later, these patients underwent TESA. A total of 174 obstructive azoospermia (OA) patients underwent TESA. Vitrified oocytes were used with micro-TESE in 35 cycles (group 1), and TESA in 10 cycles (group 2). Fresh oocytes were used with micro-TESE in 38 cycles (group 3) and TESA in 174 cycles (group 4). RESULTS The overall sperm retrieval rate of the 150 NOA patients was 48.7% (73/150). A total of 257 cycles of ICSI-ET were conducted with testicular spermatozoa; 212 cycles utilized fresh oocytes and 45 cycles utilized vitrified oocytes. No differences were observed with fertilization (73.8%, 77.2%,72.8%, 73.6%), implantation (33.3%, 34.7%, 33.8%, 37.5%), or clinical pregnancy rates (51.4%, 60%, 52.6%, 51.7%) for groups 1 through 4, respectively (P>0.05). Developmental competence was greatest among couples using sperm obtained via TESA rather than micro-TESE, not dependent on whether vitrified or fresh oocytes were utilized. Fertilization, implantation, and clinical pregnancy rates did not differ between using fresh vs. vitrified oocytes, nor did they differ between using testicular sperm derived from men with NOA vs. men with OA. CONCLUSIONS Vitrified oocytes combined with micro-TESE showed similar clinical efficacy when compared with fresh oocytes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29382506
[Au] Autor:Kanakis GA; Nieschlag E
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology, Athens Naval & VA Hospital, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: geokan@endo.gr.
[Ti] Title:Klinefelter syndrome: more than hypogonadism.
[So] Source:Metabolism;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8600
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most frequent chromosome disorder in males (1:650 newborn males), defined by 47,XXY karyotype. The classical phenotype is that of a tall male with relatively long legs, small, firm testes and gynecomastia. Azoospermia and infertility are almost inevitably present, but may be overcome by TESE and ICSI. Nevertheless, a broad spectrum of phenotypes has been described and more than 70% of the actually existing KS men may remain undiagnosed throughout their lifespan. Accordingly, hypogonadism is usually not evident until early adulthood and progresses with ageing. KS patients present a series of comorbidities that increase morbidity and mortality by 40%. Such disturbances are the impaired metabolic profile (obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance) and a tendency to thrombosis, which all favor cardiovascular disease. They also present susceptibility for specific neoplasias (breast cancer, extragonadal germ cell tumors), autoimmune diseases as well as osteoporosis and bone fractures. Moreover, KS has been associated with verbal processing and attention deficits as well as social skill impairments, leading KS individuals to academic and professional achievements inferior to those of their peers of comparable socio-economic status. Nevertheless, the majority fall within the average range regarding their intellectual abilities and adaptive functioning. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is the mainstay of treatment in hypogonadal KS patients; however, randomized trials are needed to determine optimal therapeutic regimens and follow-up schedules.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28450650
[Au] Autor:Birowo P; Putra DE; Dewi M; Rasyid N; Taher A
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Faculty of medicine Universitas Indonesia - Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. ponco.birowo@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Y-Chromosomal Microdeletion in Idiopathic Azoospermic and Severe Oligozoospermic Indonesian Men.
[So] Source:Acta Med Indones;49(1):17-23, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0125-9326
[Cp] Country of publication:Indonesia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: to detect Y-chromosomal microdeletion in Indonesian men with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia using multiplex PCR. METHODS: we performed 2 multiplex PCR amplifications of the Azoospermia Factor (AZF) region in 71 men. Criteria for including a patient were fulfilled if they presented with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, with or without additional abnormalities of sperm motility or of head morphology, raised or normal levels of FSH, normal levels of LH and testosterone, and with no evidence of testicular tumors or other abnormalities. Five men participated as control persons. RESULTS: partial deletion of AZFa was found in 11 men (15.49%), complete deletion of AZFb in 1 man (1.4%), and complete deletion of AZFc in 1 man (1.4%). The unspecific type of deletion was also detected, including the DBY gene in 2 men (2.81%), and partial deletion of both AZFa and AZFb in 2 men (2.81%). No AZF deletion was observed in the control probands. Related to the type of deletion, the AZFa and AZFb deletion showed spermatogenesis arrest in most tubules, while deletion of the DBY gene is associated with the sertoli cell only (SCO) syndrome. CONCLUSION: the frequency of partial deletion of AZFa was found to be relatively high in our center. The type of deletion is associated with the testicular histology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Azoospermia/genetics
Infertility, Male/genetics
Oligospermia/genetics
Sex Chromosome Disorders of Sex Development/genetics
Testis/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics
Chromosome Deletion
Chromosomes, Human, Y/genetics
Humans
Indonesia
Male
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sex Chromosome Aberrations
Spermatozoa/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29265486
[Au] Autor:de Sousa Filho EP; Christofolini DM; Barbosa CP; Glina S; Bianco B
[Ad] Address:Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Department of Collective Health, Human Reproduction and Genetics Center, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Y chromosome microdeletions and varicocele as aetiological factors of male infertility: A cross-sectional study.
[So] Source:Andrologia;50(3), 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0272
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The pathogenic mechanisms by which varicocele disrupt spermatogenesis are not clearly understood. Over 30% of male infertility cases resulting from spermatogenic problems are associated with genetic abnormalities, and Y chromosome microdeletions are the second most frequent genetic cause. Here, we aimed to evaluate the frequency of Y chromosome microdeletion in infertile men with varicocele. A cross-sectional study comprising 51 infertile men with varicocele presenting spermatogenesis failures was performed. Y chromosome microdeletion research was made using polymerase chain reaction. Of the 51 men with infertility and varicocele, 35.3% (18/51) had nonobstructive azoospermia and 64.7% had severe oligozoospermia. Y chromosome microdeletion was found in two cases (3.9%): one patient had nonobstructive azoospermia and complete microdeletion of the AZFb and AZFc regions, and another patient had severe oligozoospermia and complete microdeletion of the AZFc region. Although in recent years, a genetic aetiology related to Y chromosome microdeletions has become a major cause of infertility in males with spermatogenesis failures, in this study, the varicocele was the clinical cause of seminal abnormalities that could lead to infertility, suggesting that both varicocele and Y chromosome microdeletion aetiologies can present, alone or combined, as factors of male infertility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/and.12938

  9 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29486335
[Au] Autor:Potnuri AG; Allakonda L; Lahkar M
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology, St. Paul's College of Pharmacy, Turkayamjal, Hyderabad, Telangana, India. Electronic address: ajaygodwin@outlook.com.
[Ti] Title:Crocin attenuates cyclophosphamide induced testicular toxicity by preserving glutathione redox system.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;101:174-180, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chemotherapy induced testicular toxicity is an emerging reason for azoospermia and impotency in males. Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent to manage neoplastic and non-neoplastic autoimmune diseases. Testicular toxicity along with bladder and hepatotoxicity are its widely reported adverse effects. Crocin (CR) is the digentiobiosyl ester of crocetin, found in the fruits of gardenia (Gardenia jasminoides E.) and dried stigmas of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) possess antioxidant, anti-depressant, anti-tumor and aphrodisiac properties. In the light of these reports, the present study aimed to investigate protective effect of CR administration (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg per day for eight weeks) on CP induced (15 mg/kg per week for eight weeks) testicular toxicity in male Sprague dawley rats by analysing the Glutathione redox cycle, Sperm quality, spermatogenic and steroidogenesis hormonal axis, caspase 3 activity and histological investigations. Administration of CR preserved the glutathione redox cycle, sperm quality, hormonal mediators associated with sperm production. It also decreased testicular apoptosis as evident from the reduction of caspase 3 activity. These biochemical findings were well reflected on the histo-pathological investigation. Conclusively, the results of this study indicate that administration of CR can dose dependently attenuate the toxic effects of CP on testis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 5746 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29172414
[Au] Autor:Antell K; Deshmukh P; Brown EJ
[Ad] Address:Christiana Care Family Medicine Residency Program, 1401 Foulk Road, Suite 100 Wilmington, Delaware 19803.
[Ti] Title:Contraception Update: Sterilization.
[So] Source:FP Essent;462:30-34, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:2159-3000
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Female sterilization procedures include postpartum partial salpingectomy via cesarean or minilaparotomy incision, interval laparoscopic procedures, or hysteroscopic placement of microinserts. Rates of failure and serious complications are low and comparable among the various methods. A hysteroscopic procedure requires a 3-month confirmatory hysterosalpingogram before it is considered effective for contraception. Hysteroscopic sterilization has been shown to be associated with a higher reoperation rate than laparoscopic procedures. For male sterilization, vasectomy is a noninvasive and highly effective method. Vasectomy is an outpatient procedure performed under local anesthesia. The procedure requires confirmation of azoospermia with a semen analysis 8 to 16 weeks after the procedure. Patients who are considering sterilization should be counseled about all the available options and the permanent nature of such procedures.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Family Planning Services
Family Practice
Sterilization, Reproductive
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Male
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE


page 1 of 575 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information