Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Bacterial and Infections [Words]
References found : 362430 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29524843
[Au] Autor:Sena FV; Sousa FM; Oliveira ASF; Soares CM; Catarino T; Pereira MM
[Ad] Address:Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica - António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Av. da Republica EAN, 2780-157 Oeiras, Portugal.
[Ti] Title:Regulation of the mechanism of Type-II NADH: Quinone oxidoreductase from S. aureus.
[So] Source:Redox Biol;16:209-214, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:2213-2317
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Type-II NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (NDH-2s) are membrane proteins involved in respiratory chains and the only enzymes with NADH:quinone oxidoreductase activity expressed in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), one of the most common causes of clinical infections. NDH-2s are members of the two-Dinucleotide Binding Domains Flavoprotein (tDBDF) superfamily, having a flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD, as prosthetic group and NAD(P)H as substrate. The establishment of a Charge-Transfer Complex (CTC) between the isoalloxazine ring of the reduced flavin and the nicotinamide ring of NAD+ in NDH-2 was described, and in this work we explored its role in the kinetic mechanism using different electron donors and electron acceptors. We observed that CTC slows down the rate of the second half reaction (quinone reduction) and determines the effect of HQNO, an inhibitor. Also, protonation equilibrium simulations clearly indicate that the protonation probability of an important residue for proton transfer to the active site (D302) is influenced by the presence of the CTC. We propose that CTC is critical for the overall mechanism of NDH-2 and possibly relevant to keep a low quinol/quinone ratio and avoid excessive ROS production in vivo.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524548
[Au] Autor:Islam W; Qasim M; Noman A; Adnan M; Tayyab M; Farooq TH; Wei H; Wang L
[Ad] Address:College of Plant Protection, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, 350002, China; Govt. of Punjab, Agriculture Department, Lahore, Pakistan. Electronic address: ddoapsial@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Plant microRNAs: Front line players against invading pathogens.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plants are attacked by a large number of pathogens. To defend against these pathogens, plants activate or repress a vast array of genes. For genetic expression and reprogramming, host endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) are the key factors. Among these sRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) mediate gene regulation through RNA silencing at the post-transcriptional level and play an essential role in the defense responses to biotic and abiotic stress. In the recent years, high-throughput sequencing has enabled the researchers to uncover the role of plant miRNAs during pathogen invasion. So here we have reviewed the recent research findings illustrating the plant miRNAs active involvement in various defense processes during fungal, bacterial, viral and nematode infections. However, rapid validation of direct targets of miRNAs is the dire need of time, which can be very helpful in improving the plant resistance against various pathogenic diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524516
[Au] Autor:Kalia M; Yadav VK; Singh PK; Sharma D; Narvi SS; Agarwal V
[Ad] Address:Department of Biotechnology, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad 211004, India.
[Ti] Title:Exploring the impact of parthenolide as anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm agent against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
[So] Source:Life Sci;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0631
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogen responsible for various infections due to its capability to develop biofilm and various virulent phenotypes that are regulated by quorum sensing. Pathogenesis of the bacteria may be halted by interfering with the signaling molecules and the quorum sensing receptors. Therefore, the present study explores the potential of parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone of feverfew plant, as a promising candidate against P. aeruginosa PAO1 associated virulence factors and biofilm. MAIN METHODS: Effect of parthenolide on virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa was studied using standard protocols. Mechanism of action was studied using Real-time PCR as well as molecular docking studies. KEY FINDINGS: Significant decrease in virulence factors and biofilm formation was observed when treated with the sub-MIC concentration (1 mM) of parthenolide. Gene expression studies showed the down-regulation of autoinducer synthase (lasI, rhlI) as well as their receptors (lasR and rhlR) with remarked repression of lasR by 57% compared to the control. Biofilm-associated fluorescent microscopic studies after staining with FITC-ConA and propidium iodide showed reduced extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production and killing of bacterial cells after treatment with parthenolide. SIGNIFICANCE: The study is important as it reports for the first time the potential of parthenolide as an anti-quorum and anti-biofilm agent. This study will be helpful in designing of new quorum sensing inhibitors that help in the eradication of infections and can be given in combination with the antibiotics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524496
[Au] Autor:Barman TK; Kumar M; Chaira T; Dalela M; Gupta D; Jha PK; Yadav AS; Upadhyay DJ; Raj VS; Singh H
[Ad] Address:Center for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016, India; Department of Microbiology, Daiichi Sankyo India Pharma Private Limited, Village Sarhaul, Sector-18, Udyog Vihar Industrial Area, Gurgaon 122015,Haryana, India.
[Ti] Title:In vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetics of bi-aryl oxazolidinone RBx 11,760 loaded polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles in mouse hematogenous bronchopneumonia and rat groin abscess caused by Staphylococcus aureus.
[So] Source:Nanomedicine;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1549-9642
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RBx 11,760 is a bi-aryl oxazolidinone antibacterial agent active against Staphylococcus aureus but has poor solubility. Here we have encapsulated RBx 11,760 in PLA-PEG NPs with an aim to improve physicochemical, pharmacokinetics and in vivo efficacy. The average size and zeta potential of RBx 11,760 loaded NPs were found to be 106.4 nm and -22.2 mV, respectively. The absolute size of nanoparticles by HRTEM was found to be approximately 80 nm. In vitro antibacterial agar well diffusion assay showed clear zone of inhibition of bacterial growth. In pharmacokinetic study, nanoparticle showed 4.6-fold and 7-fold increase in AUC and half-life, respectively, as compared to free drug. RBx 11,760 nanoparticle significantly reduced bacterial counts in lungs and improved the survival rate of immunocompromised mice as compared to free drugs. Thus, RBx 11,760 loaded nanoparticles have strong potential to be used as nanomedicine against sensitive and drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505819
[Au] Autor:Abdollahi S; Rasooli I; Mousavi Gargari SL
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:The role of TonB-dependent copper receptor in virulence of Acinetobacter baumannii.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:181-190, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic gram negative pathogen that can adhere to different surfaces and cause different nosocomial infections. To investigate the role of TonB-dependent copper receptor, an outer membrane protein, in virulence of A. baumannii, we deleted this receptor from A. baumannii chromosome. There was a significant decrease in biofilm formation by copper receptor deficient mutant strain. Similarly, the adherence to human epithelial cell and the hydrophobicity were declined. The survival rate of the mutant strain in human sera was reduced while no change was observed in motility of strains. In murine pneumonia model, the bacterial lethal dose 0 (LD ), LD and LD were increased for mutant strain. Moreover, in vivo and in vitro experiments revealed changes in growth rate and dissemination of mutant strain; so that the bacterial load of the mutant was significantly reduced in the spleen and lung. The findings suggest a critical role for TonB-dependent copper receptor in virulence of A. baumannii.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29486273
[Au] Autor:Muhammad Iqbal BM; Rajendran S; Vasudevan S
[Ad] Address:Department of Oceanography & Coastal Area Studies, Alagappa University, Thondi Campus, Thondi 623 409, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:Isolation, identification and characterization of the bioluminescent bacteria isolated from the blue swimmer crab Portunus pelagicus along Thondi Coast and virulence studies at high temperatures.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;117:232-236, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The current study was conducted to isolate the marine bioluminescent bacteria from the blue swimmer crab Portunus pelagicus along the Thondi Coast. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization techniques including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that the isolated strain was Vibrio harveyi. Experiments were further carried out at different temperatures and various time intervals and the results revealed a significant effects of high temperature and extended time duration on elimination of V. harveyi. Hence, high temperature treatments could facilitate the suppression of V. harveyi from sea food and thereby, preventing food borne infections during human consumption.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29471085
[Au] Autor:Zhu H; Lu X; Ling L; Li H; Ou Y; Shi X; Lu Y; Zhang Y; Chen D
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiological and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Houttuynia cordata polysaccharides ameliorate pneumonia severity and intestinal injury in mice with influenza virus infection.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;218:90-99, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Hottuynia cordata is an important traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of respiratory diseases including bacterial and viral infections. Polysaccharides isolated from Houttuynia cordata (HCP), as its main ingredients, have been demonstrated to ameliorate the LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. The study aimed to determine the protective effects of HCP on multiple organ injury in influenza A virus (IAV) H1N1 infected mice and its primary mechanisms in anti-inflammation and immune regulation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice were inoculated with IAV H1N1 and then treated with 20 or 40 mg/kg/d of HCP for survival test and acute lung-gut injury test. RESULTS: The treatment with HCP resulted in an increase in the survival rate of H1N1 infected mice and the protection from lung and intestine injury, accompanied with the reduced virus replication. HCP markedly decreased the concentration of pulmonary proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and the number of intestinal goblet cells, and strengthened the intestinal physical and immune barrier, according to the increase of sIgA and tight junction protein (ZO-1) in intestine. At the same time, the inhibition of inflammation in lung and gut was related to the suppressing of the expression of TLR4 and p-NFκB p65 in lung. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicated that HCP ameliorated lung and intestine injury induced by IAV attack. The mechanisms were associated with inhibition of inflammation, protection of intestinal barrier and regulation of mucosal immunity, which may be related to the regulation of gut-lung axis. As an alternative medicine, HCP may have clinical potential to treat IAV infection in human beings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29446459
[Au] Autor:Richter MF; Hergenrother PJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois.
[Ti] Title:The challenge of converting Gram-positive-only compounds into broad-spectrum antibiotics.
[So] Source:Ann N Y Acad Sci;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1749-6632
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections are on the rise, and there is a lack of new classes of drugs to treat these pathogens. This drug shortage is largely due to the challenge of finding antibiotics that can permeate and persist inside Gram-negative species. Efforts to understand the molecular properties that enable certain compounds to accumulate in Gram-negative bacteria based on retrospective studies of known antibiotics have not been generally actionable in the development of new antibiotics. A recent assessment of the ability of >180 diverse small molecules to accumulate in Escherichia coli led to predictive guidelines for compound accumulation in E. coli. These "eNTRy rules" state that compounds are most likely to accumulate if they contain a nonsterically encumbered ionizable Nitrogen (primary amines are the best), have low Three-dimensionality (globularity ≤ 0.25), and are relatively Rigid (rotatable bonds ≤ 5). In this review, we look back through 50+ years of antibacterial research and 1000s of derivatives and assess this historical data set through the lens of these predictive guidelines. The results are consistent with the eNTRy rules, suggesting that the eNTRy rules may provide an actionable and general roadmap for the conversion of Gram-positive-only compounds into broad-spectrum antibiotics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nyas.13598

  9 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29444768
[Au] Autor:Shen X; Lu M; Feng R; Cheng J; Chai J; Xie M; Dong X; Jiang T; Wang D
[Ad] Address:School of Health Service Management, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China.
[Ti] Title:Web-Based Just-in-Time Information and Feedback on Antibiotic Use for Village Doctors in Rural Anhui, China: Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;20(2):e53, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Excessive use of antibiotics is very common worldwide, especially in rural China; various measures that have been used in curbing the problem have shown only marginal effects. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to test an innovative intervention that provided just-in-time information and feedback (JITIF) to village doctors on care of common infectious diseases. METHODS: The information component of JITIF consisted of a set of theory or evidence-based ingredients, including operation guideline, public commitment, and takeaway information, whereas the feedback component tells each participating doctor about his or her performance scores and percentages of antibiotic prescriptions. These ingredients were incorporated together in a synergetic way via a Web-based aid. Evaluation of JITIF adopted a randomized controlled trial design involving 24 village clinics randomized into equal control and intervention arms. Measures used included changes between baseline and endpoint (1 year after baseline) in terms of: percentages of patients with symptomatic respiratory or gastrointestinal tract infections (RTIs or GTIs) being prescribed antibiotics, delivery of essential service procedures, and patients' beliefs and knowledge about antibiotics and infection prevention. Two researchers worked as a group in collecting the data at each site clinic. One performed nonparticipative observation of the service process, while the other performed structured exit interviews about patients' beliefs and knowledge. Data analysis comprised mainly of: (1) descriptive estimations of beliefs or knowledge, practice of indicative procedures, and use of antibiotics at baseline and endpoint for intervention and control groups and (2) chi-square tests for the differences between these groups. RESULTS: A total of 1048 patients completed the evaluation, including 532 at baseline (intervention=269, control=263) and 516 at endpoint (intervention=262, control=254). Patients diagnosed with RTIs and GTIs accounted for 76.5% (407/532) and 23.5% (125/352), respectively, at baseline and 80.8% (417/532) and 19.2% (99/532) at endpoint. JITIF resulted in substantial improvement in delivery of essential service procedures (2.6%-24.8% at baseline on both arms and at endpoint on the control arm vs 88.5%-95.0% at endpoint on the intervention arm, P<.001), beliefs favoring rational antibiotics use (11.5%-39.8% at baseline on both arms and at endpoint on the control arm vs 19.8%-62.6% at endpoint on the intervention arm, P<.001) and knowledge about side effects of antibiotics (35.7% on the control arm vs 73.7% on the intervention arm, P<.001), measures for managing or preventing RTIs (39.1% vs 66.7%, P=.02), and measures for managing or preventing GTIs (46.8% vs 69.2%, P<.001). It also reduced antibiotics prescription (from 88.8%-62.3%, P<.001), and this decrease was consistent for RTIs (87.1% vs 64.3%, P<.001) and GTIs (94.7% vs 52.4%, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: JITIF is effective in controlling antibiotics prescription at least in the short term and may provide a low-cost and sustainable solution to the widespread excessive use of antibiotics in rural China.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.8922

  10 / 362430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29425317
[Au] Autor:Vornhagen J; Quach P; Santana-Ufret V; Alishetti V; Brokaw A; Armistead B; Qing Tang H; MacDonald JW; Bammler TK; Adams Waldorf KM; Uldbjerg N; Rajagopal L
[Ad] Address:Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Human cervical mucus plugs exhibit insufficiencies in antimicrobial activity towards Group B Streptococcus.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Preterm birth is a leading cause of neonatal mortality and lacks an effective therapy. Ascending microbial infections from the lower genital tract lead to infection of the placenta, amniotic fluid and fetus causing preterm birth or stillbirth. Directly in the path of an ascending infection is the cervical mucus plug (CMP), a dense mucoid structure in the cervical canal with potential antimicrobial properties. In this study, we aimed to define the components of CMP responsible for antimicrobial activity against a common lower genital tract organism associated with preterm birth and stillbirths, namely Group B Streptococcus (GBS). Using a quantitative proteomic approach, we identified antimicrobial factors in CMPs that were collected from healthy human pregnancies. However, we noted that the concentration of antimicrobial peptides present in the human CMPs were insufficient to directly kill GBS and antimicrobial activity, when observed, was due to antibiotics retained in the CMPs. Despite this insufficiency, CMP proteins were able to activate leukocytes in whole blood resulting in increased rates of bacterial killing, suggesting a role for the CMP in enhancing complement-mediated killing or leukocyte activation. This study provides new insight into how the human CMP may limit ascending bacterial infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jiy076


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