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[PMID]: 29523071
[Au] Autor:Dutta S; Biswas P; Chakraborty S; Mitra D; Pal A; Das M
[Ad] Address:Department of Life Sciences, Presidency University, Kolkata, India.
[Ti] Title:Identification, characterization and gene expression analyses of important flowering genes related to photoperiodic pathway in bamboo.
[So] Source:BMC Genomics;19(1):190, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Bamboo is an important member of the family Poaceae and has many inflorescence and flowering features rarely observed in other plant groups. It retains an unusual form of perennialism by having a long vegetative phase that can extend up to 120 years, followed by flowering and death of the plants. In contrast to a large number of studies conducted on the annual, reference plants Arabidopsis thaliana and rice, molecular studies to characterize flowering pathways in perennial bamboo are lacking. Since photoperiod plays a crucial role in flower induction in most plants, important genes involved in this pathway have been studied in the field grown Bambusa tulda, which flowers after 40-50 years. RESULTS: We identified several genes from B. tulda, including four related to the circadian clock [LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY), TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1), ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and GIGANTEA (GI)], two circadian clock response integrators [CONSTANS A (COA), CONSTANS B (COB)] and four floral pathway integrators [FLOWERING LOCUS T1, 2, 3, 4 (FT1, 2, 3, 4)]. These genes were amplified from either gDNA and/or cDNA using degenerate as well as gene specific primers based on homologous sequences obtained from related monocot species. The sequence identity and phylogenetic comparisons revealed their close relationships to homologs identified in the temperate bamboo Phyllostachys edulis. While the four BtFT homologs were highly similar to each other, BtCOA possessed a full-length B-box domain that was truncated in BtCOB. Analysis of the spatial expression of these genes in selected flowering and non-flowering tissue stages indicated their possible involvement in flowering. The diurnal expression patterns of the clock genes were comparable to their homologs in rice, except for BtZTL. Among multiple BtCO and BtFT homologs, the diurnal pattern of only BtCOA and BtFT3, 4 were synchronized in the flower inductive tissue, but not in the non-flowering tissues. CONCLUSION: This study elucidates the photoperiodic regulation of bamboo homologs of important flowering genes. The finding also identifies copy number expansion and gene expression divergence of CO and FT in bamboo. Further studies are required to understand their functional role in bamboo flowering.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12864-018-4571-7

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[PMID]: 29216963
[Au] Autor:Hassan A; Chen QB; Jiang T; Lyu BY; Li N; Li S; Shangguan ZY; Li YT; Jun ZL; Luo Q; Chen XY; Wang YY; Zeng CC; Yang J; Tahir MS
[Ad] Address:College of Landscape Architecture, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan, China.
[Ti] Title:Psychophysiological Effects of Bamboo Plants on Adults.
[So] Source:Biomed Environ Sci;30(11):846-850, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0895-3988
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study was conducted to clarify the psychophysiological relaxation effects of viewing bamboo on university students. Forty healthy Chinese participants enrolled in this study to clarify the psychophysiological relaxation effects of viewing bamboo. The effects of visual stimulation using a pot both with and without a bamboo were recorded by measuring the student's blood pressure, EEG and STAI. We observed that viewing bamboo plants resulted in significantly lower systolic (female, P < 0.001; male, P < 0.001; P < 0.05) and diastolic (female, P < 0.001; male, P < 0.001; P < 0.05) blood pressures, but no changes in the pulse rate (female, P = 0.09; male, P = 0.07; P > 0.05) were observed. The results of the EEG analysis indicated brainwave variation (all P < 0.05) and lower anxiety scores (P < 0.01) after 3 min of viewing bamboo compared with the control. These findings indicate that visual stimulation with bamboo plants induced psychophysiological relaxation effects on adults.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bambusa
Blood Pressure/physiology
Heart Rate/physiology
Relaxation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3967/bes2017.114

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[PMID]: 29501932
[Au] Autor:Saldaña E; Castillo LS; Sánchez JC; Siche R; de Almeida MA; Behrens JH; Selani MM; Contreras-Castillo CJ
[Ad] Address:Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Escola Superior de Agricultura "Luiz de Queiroz" (ESALQ), Departamento de Agroindústria, Alimentos e Nutrição (LAN), Piracicaba, SP 13418-900, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Descriptive analysis of bacon smoked with Brazilian woods from reforestation: methodological aspects, statistical analysis, and study of sensory characteristics.
[So] Source:Meat Sci;140:44-50, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4138
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to perform a descriptive analysis (DA) of bacons smoked with woods from reforestation and liquid smokes in order to investigate their sensory profile. Six samples of bacon were selected: three smoked bacons with different wood species (Eucalyptus citriodora, Acacia mearnsii, and Bambusa vulgaris), two artificially smoked bacon samples (liquid smoke) and one negative control (unsmoked bacon). Additionally, a commercial bacon sample was also evaluated. DA was developed successfully, presenting a good performance in terms of discrimination, consensus and repeatability. The study revealed that the smoking process modified the sensory profile by intensifying the "saltiness" and differentiating the unsmoked from the smoked samples. The results from the current research represent the first methodological development of descriptive analysis of bacon and may be used by food companies and other stakeholders to understand the changes in sensory characteristics of bacon due to traditional smoking process.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29293910
[Au] Autor:Chaves LF; Jian JY; Moji K
[Ad] Address:Programa de Investigación en Enfermedades Tropicales (PIET), Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica.
[Ti] Title:Overwintering in the Bamboo Mosquito Tripteroides bambusa (Diptera: Culicidae) During a Warm, But Unpredictably Changing, Winter.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;47(1):148-158, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The bamboo mosquito, Tripteroides bambusa (Yamada) (Diptera: Culicidae), is a common insect across forested landscapes in Japan. Several studies have reported its overwintering as larvae and eggs, in both natural and artificial water containers. Nevertheless, it is unclear how sensitive this mosquito species is to changes in weather patterns associated with global warming. The El Niño event of 2015 through 2016 was one of the strongest on record and provided an ideal scenario for observations on the overwintering of the bamboo mosquito during a winter predicted to be unusually warm. Thus, we set oviposition traps in mid October 2015 and made weekly observations, from December 2015 to May 2016, on bamboo mosquito larval recruitment and pupation in Nagasaki, Japan. We found that larvae were pupating as late as the first week of January (prior records from the study site indicated mosquito pupation ended by mid-late October) and that pupation resumed in mid April (one month earlier than previous records at the study site). We also found that fourth instar larvae were able to survive in frozen oviposition traps following an extremely unusual snowstorm and cold spell and that recruitment of larvae from eggs happened after this unusual event. Our analysis suggested that overwintering and metamorphosis of the bamboo mosquito is sensitive to average and extreme temperatures, the latter measured by temperature kurtosis. Our results highlight the need to better understand changes in overwintering strategies in insects, and associated trade-offs and impacts on population dynamics, in light of climate change.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/ee/nvx187

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[PMID]: 29320501
[Au] Autor:Tang Y; Winkler JA; Viña A; Liu J; Zhang Y; Zhang X; Li X; Wang F; Zhang J; Zhao Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Uncertainty of future projections of species distributions in mountainous regions.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0189496, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Multiple factors introduce uncertainty into projections of species distributions under climate change. The uncertainty introduced by the choice of baseline climate information used to calibrate a species distribution model and to downscale global climate model (GCM) simulations to a finer spatial resolution is a particular concern for mountainous regions, as the spatial resolution of climate observing networks is often insufficient to detect the steep climatic gradients in these areas. Using the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) modeling framework together with occurrence data on 21 understory bamboo species distributed across the mountainous geographic range of the Giant Panda, we examined the differences in projected species distributions obtained from two contrasting sources of baseline climate information, one derived from spatial interpolation of coarse-scale station observations and the other derived from fine-spatial resolution satellite measurements. For each bamboo species, the MaxEnt model was calibrated separately for the two datasets and applied to 17 GCM simulations downscaled using the delta method. Greater differences in the projected spatial distributions of the bamboo species were observed for the models calibrated using the different baseline datasets than between the different downscaled GCM simulations for the same calibration. In terms of the projected future climatically-suitable area by species, quantification using a multi-factor analysis of variance suggested that the sum of the variance explained by the baseline climate dataset used for model calibration and the interaction between the baseline climate data and the GCM simulation via downscaling accounted for, on average, 40% of the total variation among the future projections. Our analyses illustrate that the combined use of gridded datasets developed from station observations and satellite measurements can help estimate the uncertainty introduced by the choice of baseline climate information to the projected changes in species distribution.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biodiversity
Ecosystem
Uncertainty
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bambusa
Climate Change
Probability
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180129
[Lr] Last revision date:180129
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189496

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[PMID]: 29222032
[Au] Autor:Zihad SMNK; Saha S; Rony MS; Banu H; Uddin SJ; Shilpi JA; Grice ID
[Ad] Address:Pharmacy Discipline, Life Science School, Khulna University, Khulna 9208, Bangladesh. Electronic address: neamulzihad@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Assessment of the laxative activity of an ethanolic extract of Bambusa arundinacea (Retz.) Willd. shoot.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;214:8-12, 2018 Mar 25.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOBOTANICAL RELEVANCE: Bambusa arundinacea (Retz.) Willd., commonly known as Kanta Bans, plays an important ethnobotanical role, especially in Asia. In traditional medicine it has reportedly been used for the treatment of constipation, blood-diseases, leucodema, inflammation and urinary discharges. A number of ethnomedicinal records exist regarding the use of B. arundinaceae shoots as a laxative, however, there are no scientific studies reported on its laxative activity. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to evaluate the laxative activity of an ethanolic B. arundinaceae shoot extract in mice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: B. arundinacea shoots were collected from Dhaka, Bangladesh in July 2015. An ethanolic shoot extract was obtained and its laxative activity was evaluated by faecal consistency, gastrointestinal transit and entero-pooling assays in a mouse model. Furthermore, a phytochemical investigation of the extract was conducted by UHPLC-ESI-QqQ MS and UHPLC-ESI-Orbitrap MS analysis. RESULTS: The ethanolic shoot extract of B. arundinacea showed significant laxative activity in our mouse model, with significant increases in (i) the amount of wet faeces, with the maximum effect at 2h for 500mg/kg (47.92%), (ii) gastrointestinal transit (67.18% and 60.03% for doses of 250 and 500mg/kg, respectively), and (iii) small intestine content at the test doses of 250 and 500mg/kg p.o. Phytochemical investigation identified a total of thirty compounds in the ethanolic shoot extract of B. arundinacea using UHPLC-ESI-QqQ MS and UHPLC-ESI-Orbitrap MS analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study provide support for the traditional use of B. arundinacea shoot as a laxative.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180115
[Lr] Last revision date:180115
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29210331
[Au] Autor:Khapre A; Kumar S; Rajasekaran C
[Ad] Address:a Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Division , CSIR-National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI) , Nagpur , India.
[Ti] Title:Phytocapping: an alternate cover option for municipal solid waste landfills.
[So] Source:Environ Technol;:1-8, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:0959-3330
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Landfill gases are produced due to biodegradation of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW) when water comes into contact with buried wastes under prevailing anaerobic conditions. To minimize the percolation of water in landfills, the conventional approaches such as clay capping is still practised in India. As landfill gas extraction system is an expensive technique,'Phytocapping' to mitigate landfill gases and to minimize percolation of water into the landfill can be one of the attractive alternatives. The present study aimed to determine efficiency of a laboratory-scale phytocap in terms of methane emissions, heavy metals' remediation and plant-soil interactions in Indian climatic conditions using six native plants in five planters (30 cm × 30 cm × 25 cm) with 5 kg of MSW. Overall methane oxidation due to vegetation was observed throughout the vegetated planters when compared to non-vegetated planters. Root zone methane concentrations were also monitored for the plant species, with the highest reduction occurring in root zones of Agave sisalana and Bambusa sulfurea and highest trace elements' remediation potential was observed in Brassica juncea and Helianthus annus plants. 96-98% of CH oxidation and 85-89% of heavy metals remediation was achieved through the study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/09593330.2017.1414314

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[PMID]: 28941702
[Au] Autor:Felisberto MHF; Miyake PSE; Beraldo AL; Clerici MTPS
[Ad] Address:Department of Food Technology, School of Food Engineering, University of Campinas (UNICAMP) - Cidade Universitária Zeferino Vaz, Monteiro Lobato, 80, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: mariaferrari.felisberto@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Young bamboo culm: Potential food as source of fiber and starch.
[So] Source:Food Res Int;101:96-102, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7145
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:With the objective of widening the use of bamboo in the food industry, the present work aimed to produce and characterize the young bamboo culm flours from varieties Dendrocalamus asper, Bambusa tuldoides and Bambusa vulgaris as potential sources of fiber and starch. The young culms were collected, cut in three sections (bottom, middle, top), processed into flour, and they were physically, chemically and technologically analyzed. The data were obtained in triplicate and evaluated by means of average differences, using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scott-Knott test (p<0.05). The young bamboo culms flours presented low values for moisture content (<10g/100g), protein, lipids and ash contents (<3g/100g). Regarding the carbohydrates profile, the flours were significantly different in their sugar, starch and total fiber contents. All flour samples presented a potential for fiber extraction (>60g/100g), and the varieties B. vulgaris and D. asper, presented an additional potential for starch extraction (16 and 10g/100g, respectively). Regarding technological characteristics, all flours presented bright yellow color, lightly acidic pH (>5.0), water solubility index (WSI) lower to 2.5%, excepting D. asper, which presented a WSI superior to 7.5%. In this way, the evaluated young bamboo culms present potential application in the food industry as flours and as source of fibers; in addition, the varieties D. asper and B. vulgaris can also be used for starch extraction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170924
[Lr] Last revision date:170924
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 28567632
[Au] Autor:Goyal AK; Middha SK; Usha T; Sen A
[Ad] Address:Bamboo Technology, Department of Biotechnology, Bodoland University, Kokrajhar, 783370, Assam, India. arvindgoyal210883@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Analysis of toxic, antidiabetic and antioxidant potential of Bambusa balcooa Roxb. leaf extracts in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.
[So] Source:3 Biotech;7(2):120, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2190-572X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bambusa balcooa (Poaceae) is native to India and has been used traditionally by the tribes of Northeast India to treat diabetes. The present investigation was aimed to evaluate the toxicity, anti-diabetic activity along with in vitro antioxidant activity of the leaf of B. balcooa in alloxan-induced diabetic rats and also identify active compounds by using HPLC. The acute toxicity test of aqueous extract of B. balcooa leaf revealed that the median lethal dose (LD ) of B. balcooa aqueous extract (BAQE) was 5.18 g/kg body weight in mice. Administration of BAQE at 100 and 200 mg/kg in alloxan-induced diabetic rats showed significant reduction in fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin while plasma insulin level was elevated compared to diabetic control. Both the doses were effective when compared to diabetic glibenclamide rats. The BAQE treated diabetic rats showed significant increase in the endogenous antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and decrease in malondialdehyde levels. HPLC analysis of BAQE showed the presence of rutin, gallic acid and ß sitosterol. Thus, it can be inferred from this study that BAQE possess antidiabetic and in vivo antioxidant activity. The overall activity might be possibly due to the presence of potential antioxidants.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13205-017-0776-8

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[PMID]: 28439758
[Au] Autor:Ghosh JS; Bhattacharya S; Pal A
[Ad] Address:Division of Plant Biology, Bose Institute, P1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Kolkata, 700054, India.
[Ti] Title:Molecular phylogeny of 21 tropical bamboo species reconstructed by integrating non-coding internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and 2) sequences and their consensus secondary structure.
[So] Source:Genetica;145(3):319-333, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1573-6857
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The unavailability of the reproductive structure and unpredictability of vegetative characters for the identification and phylogenetic study of bamboo prompted the application of molecular techniques for greater resolution and consensus. We first employed internal transcribed spacer (ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2) sequences to construct the phylogenetic tree of 21 tropical bamboo species. While the sequence alone could grossly reconstruct the traditional phylogeny amongst the 21-tropical species studied, some anomalies were encountered that prompted a further refinement of the phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, we integrated the secondary structure of the ITS sequences to derive individual sequence-structure matrix to gain more resolution on the phylogenetic reconstruction. The results showed that ITS sequence-structure is the reliable alternative to the conventional phenotypic method for the identification of bamboo species. The best-fit topology obtained by the sequence-structure based phylogeny over the sole sequence based one underscores closer clustering of all the studied Bambusa species (Sub-tribe Bambusinae), while Melocanna baccifera, which belongs to Sub-Tribe Melocanneae, disjointedly clustered as an out-group within the consensus phylogenetic tree. In this study, we demonstrated the dependability of the combined (ITS sequence+structure-based) approach over the only sequence-based analysis for phylogenetic relationship assessment of bamboo.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Phylogeny
RNA, Untranslated/genetics
Sasa/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Nucleic Acid Conformation
RNA, Untranslated/chemistry
Sasa/classification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Untranslated)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171020
[Lr] Last revision date:171020
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170426
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10709-017-9967-9


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