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[PMID]: 29084702
[Au] Autor:Bakht J; Iftikhar Z; Shafi M; Iqbal A
[Ad] Address:Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, The University of Agriculture Peshawar KPK Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Report - Screening of medicinally important Berberis lyceum for their antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion assay.
[So] Source:Pak J Pharm Sci;30(5):1783-1789, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1011-601X
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present research was focused on the anti-microbial activities of different solvent extracted fractions from commercial available and fresh plants of Berberis lyceum against Gram positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi using 1 and 2 mg disc concentrations. Our results showed that fractions from both sources revealed different degree of antimicrobial activities. Our result indicated that Escherichia coli, Citorbacter freundii and Candida albicans were more susceptible to crude methanolic extract and the same microbes were resistant to water extracted fractions. Similarly, maximum reduction in the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Xanthomonas campestris was measured by hexane-extracted fractions and minimum growth inhibition by water-extracted fractions. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus were more susceptible to ethyl acetate fraction. Majority of the tested microbes were resistant to water and butanol extracted samples. Staphylococcus aureus was the most susceptible gram-positive bacteria and Bacillus subtilis was resistant one. Among Gram-negative bacteria, Citorbacter freundii showed maximum susceptibility while Xanthomonas campestris revealed resistivity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28801823
[Au] Autor:Nichelmann L; Bilger W
[Ad] Address:Botanical Institute, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, Olshausenstraße 40, 24098, Kiel, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Quantification of light screening by anthocyanins in leaves of Berberis thunbergii.
[So] Source:Planta;246(6):1069-1082, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2048
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:MAIN CONCLUSION: Up to 40% of incident light was screened in red Berberis leaves in vivo by anthocyanins, resulting also in up to 40% reduction of light-limited photosynthesis. The biological function of anthocyanins in leaves has been strongly discussed, but the hypothesis of a screening function is favored by most authors. For an evaluation of the function as photoprotective pigments, a quantification of their screening of the mesophyll is important. Here, chlorophyll fluorescence excitation of leaves of a red and a green variety of Berberis thunbergii was used to estimate the extent of screening by anthocyanins at 545 nm and over the whole photosynthetically active wavelength range. Growth at high light (430 µmol m s ) resulted in 90% screening at 545 nm corresponding to 40-50% screening over the whole wavelength range, depending on the light source. The concomitant reduction of photosynthetic quantum yield was of the same size as the calculated reduction of light reaching the chloroplasts. The induction of anthocyanins in the red variety also enhanced the epoxidation state of the violaxanthin cycle under growth conditions, indicating that red leaves were suffering less from excessive irradiance. Pool sizes of violaxanthin cycle carotenoids indicated a shade acclimation of the light harvesting complexes in red leaves. The observed reduction of internal light in anthocyanic leaves has by necessity a photoprotective effect.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00425-017-2752-2

  3 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28456866
[Au] Autor:Jiao M; Tan C; Wang L; Guo J; Zhang H; Kang Z; Guo J
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China.
[Ti] Title:Basidiospores of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici succeed to infect barberry, while Urediniospores are blocked by non-host resistance.
[So] Source:Protoplasma;254(6):2237-2246, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1615-6102
[Cp] Country of publication:Austria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Stripe rust (Yellow rust) caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) is a major disease of wheat worldwide. The use of resistant cultivars to control Pst has been very effective, low-cost, and ecologically sound. However, virulence patterns of Pst can quickly change, which may render resistant cultivars susceptible. The discovery of infection of Berberis spp. by basidiospores of Pst in 2010 raised important concerns about the evolution of new virulent races of the pathogen. Little is known about the infection process of Berberis spp. by basidiospores of Pst and the interaction between Berberis spp. and asexual urediniospores. In this study, the interaction between Pst urediniospores and Berberis spp. was investigated at histological and cytological levels. Our results indicate that Berberis spp. expresses a continuum of layered defenses comprised of structural and chemical changes in the cell wall as well as post-haustorial hypersensitive responses to urediniospore infection. Our study also re-examines in detail the infection process of Pst basidiospores on Berberis spp. and provides useful information for further research on the molecular mechanisms governing the interaction between Berberis spp. and Pst.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 171027
[Lr] Last revision date:171027
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00709-017-1114-z

  4 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28579298
[Au] Autor:McCubrey JA; Lertpiriyapong K; Steelman LS; Abrams SL; Cocco L; Ratti S; Martelli AM; Candido S; Libra M; Montalto G; Cervello M; Gizak A; Rakus D
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA. Electronic address: mccubreyj@ecu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Regulation of GSK-3 activity by curcumin, berberine and resveratrol: Potential effects on multiple diseases.
[So] Source:Adv Biol Regul;65:77-88, 2017 08.
[Is] ISSN:2212-4934
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Natural products or nutraceuticals promote anti-aging, anti-cancer and other health-enhancing effects. A key target of the effects of natural products may be the regulation of the PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTORC1/GSK-3 pathway. This review will focus on the effects of curcumin (CUR), berberine (BBR) and resveratrol (RES), on the PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTORC1/GSK-3 pathway, with a special focus on GSK-3. These natural products may regulate the pathway by multiple mechanisms including: reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytokine receptors, mirco-RNAs (miRs) and many others. CUR is present the root of turmeric (Curcuma longa). CUR is used in the treatment of many disorders, especially in those involving inflammatory processes which may contribute to abnormal proliferation and promote cancer growth. BBR is also isolated from various plants (Berberis coptis and others) and is used in traditional medicine to treat multiple diseases/conditions including: diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cancer and bacterial infections. RES is present in red grapes, other fruits and berries such as blueberries and raspberries. RES may have some anti-diabetic and anti-cancer effects. Understanding the effects of these natural products on the PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTORC1/GSK-3 pathway may enhance their usage as anti-proliferative agent which may be beneficial for many health problems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 171019
[Lr] Last revision date:171019
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29029041
[Au] Autor:Williams SC; Linske MA; Ward JS
[Ad] Address:Department of Forestry and Horticulture, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, PO Box 1106, New Haven, CT 06504.
[Ti] Title:Long-Term Effects of Berberis thunbergii (Ranunculales: Berberidaceae) Management on Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) Abundance and Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) Prevalence in Connecticut, USA.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;, 2017 Sep 26.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii de Candolle; Ranunculales: Berberidaceae) is an exotic invasive shrub that escaped cultivation in the United States and is now permanently established in many eastern and midwestern states. This study examined the long-term impacts of Japanese barberry management on blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis Say; Acari: Ixodidae) abundances and associated prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt, and Brenner; Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae), the etiologic agent of Lyme disease. At six locations across Connecticut, adult I. scapularis were sampled for up to 10 yr. At each location, we sampled an area where barberry infestations were unmanipulated, adjacent areas where barberry was virtually nonexistent, and areas where barberry was managed utilizing a variety of techniques. Barberry management reduced B. burgdorferi-infected adult I. scapularis (BBIAIS) abundances (191/ha ± 64 SE) over 6 yr to statistically indifferent from that of no barberry areas (140/ha ± 47 SE; P = 0.080) and significantly less than intact barberry stands (458/ha ± 80 SE; P = 0.026). Over 9 yr, BBIAIS abundances in managed barberry remained lower than intact barberry stands (P = 0.037), but increased to be significantly greater than no barberry areas (P = 0.007) as cover increased over time. Longer-term data further document that Japanese barberry infestations are favorable habitat for I. scapularis. Control of Japanese barberry and other invasives should be at least on a 5-yr rotation to maintain low levels of invasive cover and eliminate humidity refugia to expose juvenile I. scapularis to more hostile environmental conditions in the interest of public health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171013
[Lr] Last revision date:171013
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/ee/nvx146

  6 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28558642
[Au] Autor:Ghafourian S
[Ad] Address:Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam. Iran.
[Ti] Title:Hth-xre Toxin Antitoxin Loci And Many Unevaluated Toxin Antitoxin Loci In Pseudomonas Aeruginosa B136-33- Bioinformatics Analysis.
[So] Source:Infect Disord Drug Targets;17(3):192-198, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2212-3989
[Cp] Country of publication:United Arab Emirates
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: As it is obvious, there is much documentation that shows the importance of breast cancer treatment in patients. High expressions of P53 and Bcl-2 are associated with breast cancer, which are reliable factors to follow up the breast cancer. Berberis vulgaris is used as a traditional medicine in cancer. Despite of the fact that many researches have demonstrated its anti-cancer properties, there are no scientific documents to show its efficacy in detail in breast cancer. OBJECTIVE: Because of traditional use of B.vulgaris and little knowledge about its effects, our research was focused on determining the efficacy and toxicity of B. vulgaris. For this reason, we determined the efficacy of B. vulgaris on breast cancer cells. METHOD: As described in Method section, standard protocols including MTT assay and qPCR were performed to identify the effect of B. vulgaris ethanolic extract against breast cancer cells. RESULTS: Our results clearly demonstrated that 35 mg/ml had IC50 against 3t3 normal cells, and 9 mg/ml of B. vulgaris was effective against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The results demonstrated that even at only 1 mg/ml concentration of B. vulgaris, crude extract was effective, 9 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml of extract had better anti-cancer activity compared with doxorubicin. CONCLUSION: Despite that the role of anticancer properties of B. vulgaris was clearly defined in some patents, our results demonstrated the potency of B. vulgaris against breast cancer, but further analysis should be performed to candidate this herb as an anti-breast cancer drug.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 171016
[Lr] Last revision date:171016
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2174/1871526517666170531113759

  7 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27542453
[Au] Autor:Bhatt ID; Rawat S; Badhani A; Rawal RS
[Ad] Address:G. B. Pant National Institute of Himalayan Environment and Sustainable Development, Kosi-Katarmal, Almora 263 643, Uttarakhand, India. Electronic address: id_bhatt@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Nutraceutical potential of selected wild edible fruits of the Indian Himalayan region.
[So] Source:Food Chem;215:84-91, 2017 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:0308-8146
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Wild edible fruits contribute significantly to the nutritional security of mankind across the globe. However, detailed analyses of health promoting bioactive compounds and antioxidants are lacking, especially in Himalayan wild edible fruits. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant potential of 10 wild edible fruits reveal that Terminalia chebula, Phyllanthus emblica and Myrica esculenta are the richest source of total phenolics; Pyaracantha crenulata, Terminalia chebula and Berberis asiatica for flavonoids; Phyllanthus emblica, Morus alba and Ficus palmata for ascorbic acid, anthocyanins, and Morus alba for ß-carotene. Phenolic compounds, i.e. Gallic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid varied among species and found the maximum in Terminalia chebula and Phyllanthus emblica. Antioxidant activity showed the significant relation with total phenolics, flavonoids and phenolic compounds. Results indicated that these species should be promoted as a natural source of antioxidant/nutraceuticals so that these antioxidants can be used for supplementing dietary foods of mountain people.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angiosperms/chemistry
Dietary Supplements/analysis
Fruit/chemistry
Plant Extracts/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Angiosperms/classification
Anthocyanins/analysis
Antioxidants/analysis
Ascorbic Acid/analysis
Coumaric Acids/analysis
Flavonoids/analysis
India
Phenols/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anthocyanins); 0 (Antioxidants); 0 (Coumaric Acids); 0 (Flavonoids); 0 (Phenols); 0 (Plant Extracts); IBS9D1EU3J (4-coumaric acid); PQ6CK8PD0R (Ascorbic Acid)
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 171013
[Lr] Last revision date:171013
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160820
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28876207
[Au] Autor:Yuan C; Wang M; Skinner DZ; See DR; Xia C; Guo X; Chen X
[Ad] Address:Washington State University, Plant Pathology, Pullman, Washington, United States ; pingboycy@163.com.
[Ti] Title:Inheritance of Virulence, Construction of a Linkage Map, and Mapping Dominant Virulence Genes in Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici through Characterization of a Sexual Population with Genotyping-by-Sequencing.
[So] Source:Phytopathology;, 2017 Sep 06.
[Is] ISSN:0031-949X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), the wheat stripe rust pathogen, is a dikaryotic, biotrophic, and macrocyclic fungus. Genetic study of Pst virulence was not possible until the recent discovery of Berberis spp. and Mahonia spp. as alternate hosts. To determine inheritance of virulence and map virulence genes, a segregating population of 119 isolates was developed by self-fertilizing Pst isolate 08-220 (race PSTv-11) on barberry leaves under controlled greenhouse conditions. The progeny isolates were phenotyped on a set of 29 wheat lines with single genes for race-specific resistance and genotyped with simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, simple sequence repeat derived from secreted protein genes (SP-SNP), and SNP markers from genotyping- by-sequencing (GBS). Using the GBS technique, 10,163 polymorphic GBS-SNP markers were identified. Clustering and principal component analysis grouped these markers into six genetic groups, and a genetic map, consisting of six linkage groups, was constructed with 805 markers. The six clusters or linkage groups resulting from these analyses indicated a haploid chromosome number of six in Pst. Through virulence testing of the progeny isolates, the parental isolate was found to be homozygous for the avirulence loci corresponding to resistance genes Yr5, Yr10, Yr15, Yr24, Yr32, YrSP, YrTr1, Yr45, and Yr53 and homozygous for the virulence locus corresponding to resistance gene Yr41. Segregation was observed for virulence phenotypes in response to the remaining 19 single-gene lines. A single dominant gene or two dominant genes with different non-allelic gene interactions were identified for each of the segregating virulence phenotypes. Of 27 dominant virulence genes identified, 17 were mapped to two chromosomes. Markers tightly linked to some of the virulence loci may facilitate further studies to clone these genes. The virulence genes and their inheritance information are useful for understanding the host-pathogen interactions and for selecting effective resistance genes or gene combinations for developing stripe rust resistant wheat cultivars.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170925
[Lr] Last revision date:170925
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1094/PHYTO-04-17-0139-R

  9 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28916288
[Au] Autor:Lang S; Popp T; Kriegs CS; Schmidt A; Balszuweit F; Menacher G; Kehe K; Thiermann H; Gudermann T; Steinritz D
[Ad] Address:Bundeswehr Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 80937 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: lang_simon@gmx.net.
[Ti] Title:Anti-apoptotic and moderate anti-inflammatory effects of berberine in sulfur mustard exposed keratinocytes.
[So] Source:Toxicol Lett;, 2017 Sep 13.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3169
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Skin affections after sulfur mustard (SM) exposure include erythema, blister formation and severe inflammation. An antidote or specific therapy does not exist. Anti-inflammatory compounds as well as substances counteracting SM-induced cell death are under investigation. In this study, we investigated the benzylisoquinoline alkaloide berberine (BER), a metabolite in plants like berberis vulgaris, which is used as herbal pharmaceutical in Asian countries, against SM toxicity using a well-established in vitro approach. Keratinocyte (HaCaT) mono-cultures (MoC) or HaCaT/THP-1 co-cultures (CoC) were challenged with 100, 200 or 300mM SM for 1h. Post-exposure, both MoC and CoC were treated with 10, 30 or 50µM BER for 24h. At that time, supernatants were collected and analyzed both for interleukine (IL) 6 and 8 levels and for content of adenylate-kinase (AK) as surrogate marker for cell necrosis. Cells were lysed and nucleosome formation as marker for late apoptosis was assessed. In parallel, AK in cells was determined for normalization purposes. BER treatment did not influence necrosis, but significantly decreased apoptosis. Anti-inflammatory effects were moderate, but also significant, primarily in CoC. Overall, BER has protective effects against SM toxicity in vitro. Whether this holds true should be evaluated in future in vivo studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170922
[Lr] Last revision date:170922
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 452 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28537012
[Au] Autor:Cicero AFG; Fogacci F; Morbini M; Colletti A; Bove M; Veronesi M; Giovannini M; Borghi C
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine and Surgery Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. arrigo.cicero@unibo.it.
[Ti] Title:Nutraceutical Effects on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Patients with Impaired Fasting Glucose: A Pilot, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial on a Combined Product.
[So] Source:High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev;, 2017 May 23.
[Is] ISSN:1179-1985
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: A number of natural compounds have individually demonstrated to improve glucose and lipid levels in humans. AIM: To  evaluate the short-term glucose and lipid-lowering activity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose. METHODS: To assess the effects of a combination of nutraceuticals based on Lagerstroemia speciosa, Berberis aristata, Curcuma longa, Alpha-lipoic acid, Chrome picolinate and Folic acid, we performed a double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial in 40 adults affected by impaired fasting glucose (FPG = 100-125 mg/dL) in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. After a period of 2 weeks of dietary habits correction only, patients continued the diet and began a period of 8 weeks of treatment with nutraceutical or placebo. Data related to lipid pattern, insulin resistance, liver function and hsCRP were obtained at the baseline and at the end of the study. RESULTS: No side effects were detected in both groups of subjects. After the nutraceutical treatment, and compared to the placebo-treated group, the enrolled patients experienced a significant improvement in TG (-34.7%), HDL-C (+13.7), FPI (-13.4%), and HOMA-Index (-25%) versus the baseline values. No significant changes were observed in the other investigated parameters in both groups (Body Mass Index, LDL-C, hsCRP). CONCLUSIONS: The tested combination of nutraceuticals showed clinical efficacy in the improvement of TG, HDL-C, FPI and HOMA-Index, with an optimal tolerability profile. Further confirmation is needed to verify these observations on the middle and long term with a larger number of subjects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170919
[Lr] Last revision date:170919
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40292-017-0206-3


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