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[PMID]: 29493793
[Au] Autor:Lydecker JA; Grilo CM
[Ad] Address:Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, 06519.
[Ti] Title:Comparing men and women with binge-eating disorder and co-morbid obesity.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study examined differences in clinical presentation of men and women with binge-eating disorder (BED) who participated in treatment research at a medical-school based program. METHOD: Participants were 682 adults (n = 182 men, n = 500 women) with DSM-IV-defined BED. Doctoral-level research clinicians assessed eating-disorder psychopathology, including BED diagnosis, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID) and Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) interview. Research clinicians measured height and weight and participants completed a battery of established self-report measures. RESULTS: Men had significantly higher body mass index (BMI) than women; women had significantly higher eating-disorder psychopathology (EDE scales and global score) and depression than men. Differences in eating-disorder psychopathology and depression remained higher for women than men after adjusting for race/ethnicity and BMI. Frequency of binge-eating episodes, subjective binge-eating episodes, and overeating episodes did not differ significantly by sex. Women had younger ages of onset for dieting and binge-eating behaviors than men but ages of onset for obesity and BED did not significantly differ between men and women. DISCUSSION: There are some sex differences in clinical presentation and age-of-onset timeline of adults with BED. Men and women develop obesity and BED (at diagnostic threshold) around the same age but women begin dieting and binge-eating behaviors earlier than men. At presentation for treatment for BED, men and women did not differ in binge-eating frequency and although men and women differed significantly on BMI and eating-disorder psychopathology, the magnitude of these differences was quite modest.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22847

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[PMID]: 29328501
[Au] Autor:Kollei I; Rustemeier M; Schroeder S; Jongen S; Herpertz S; Loeber S
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Otto-Friedrich-University of Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Cognitive control functions in individuals with obesity with and without binge-eating disorder.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;51(3):233-240, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Deficits in cognitive control are thought to contribute to the maintenance of obesity (OB). Cognitive control is referred to as impulsivity and binge-eating disorder (BED) is characterized by high levels of impulsivity. The present study sought to elucidate which cognitive control functions differentiate between severe OB with and without BED also taking into account hunger as a moderating factor. METHOD: The study included 48 individuals with OB and BED (OB + BED), 48 individuals with OB and no BED (OB - BED) and 48 normal-weight controls (NWC). Hunger was systematically manipulated: participants were instructed to refrain from eating before testing and received either a liquid meal or flavored water. Then, a comprehensive test battery was administered including a food-related go/no-go task and several subtests from the CANTAB. RESULTS: There were no differences between the groups with regard to food-related response inhibition. However, while manipulating hunger had no impact on performance in the go/no-go task, self-reported hunger significantly influenced task performance by increasing inhibition deficits to high-caloric stimuli in OB + BED. With regard to general cognitive control functions, we found that deficits in attention and impulse control in decision-making distinguished OB from NWC, while reversal learning and risk taking in decision-making appeared to be relevant factors when distinguishing OB + BED from OB - BED. DISCUSSION: Our results indicate that self-reported hunger differentially affected food-related response inhibition. Group differences in general cognitive control functions were limited to attention, reversal learning, and decision-making. Future research needs to account for other possible moderating factors, such as mood, food craving, or stress.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22824

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[PMID]: 29473191
[Au] Autor:Mathisen TF; Rosenvinge JH; Friborg O; Pettersen G; Stensrud T; Hansen BH; Underhaug KE; Teinung E; Vrabel K; Svendsen M; Bratland-Sanda S; Sundgot-Borgen J
[Ad] Address:Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Sognsvegen 220, N-0806 Oslo, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Body composition and physical fitness in women with bulimia nervosa or binge-eating disorder.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Knowledge about physical fitness in women with bulimia nervosa (BN) or binge-eating disorder (BED) is sparse. Previous studies have measured physical activity largely through self-report, and physical fitness variables are mainly restricted to body mass index (BMI) and bone mineral density. We expanded the current knowledge in these groups by including a wider range of physical fitness indicators and objective measures of physical activity, assessed the influence of a history of anorexia nervosa (AN), and evaluated predictive variables for physical fitness. METHOD: Physical activity, blood pressure, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscle strength, body composition, and bone mineral density were measured in 156 women with BN or BED, with mean (SD) age 28.4 years (5.7) and BMI 25.3 (4.8) kg m . RESULTS: Level of physical activity was higher than normative levels, still <50% met the official physical activity recommendation. Fitness in women with BN were on an average comparable with recommendations or normative levels, while women with BED had lower CRF and higher BMI, VAT, and body fat percentage. We found 10-12% with masked obesity. A history of AN did not predict current physical fitness, still values for current body composition were lower when comparing those with history of AN to those with no such history. DISCUSSION: Overall, participants with BN or BED displayed adequate physical fitness; however, a high number had unfavorable CRF and body composition. This finding calls for inclusion of physical fitness in routine clinical examinations and guided physical activity and dietary recommendations in the treatment of BN and BED.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22841

  4 / 1445 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29258368
[Au] Autor:Ward K; Citrome L
[Ad] Address:a University of Michigan College of Pharmacy , Ann Arbor , MI , USA.
[Ti] Title:Lisdexamfetamine: chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability in the treatment of binge eating disorder.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol;14(2):229-238, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7607
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The indications for lisdexamfetamine (LDX), a central nervous system stimulant, were recently expanded to include treatment of moderate to severe binge eating disorder (BED). Areas covered: This review aims to describe the chemistry and pharmacology of LDX, as well as the clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of this medication for the management of BED. Expert opinion: LDX is the first medication with United States Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of BED. It is an inactive prodrug of d-amphetamine that extends the half-life of d-amphetamine to allow for once daily dosing. D-amphetamine acts primarily to increase the concentrations of synaptic dopamine and norepinephrine. Metabolism of LDX to d-amphetamine occurs when peptidases in red blood cells cleave the covalent bond between d-amphetamine and l-lysine. D-amphetamine is then further metabolized by CYP2D6. Excretion is primarily through renal mechanisms. In clinical trials, LDX demonstrated statistical and clinical superiority over placebo in reducing binge eating days per week at doses of 50 and 70 mg daily. Commonly reported side effects of LDX include dry mouth, insomnia, weight loss, and headache, and its use should be avoided in patients with known structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, serious heart arrhythmia or coronary artery disease. As with all CNS stimulants, risk of abuse needs to be assessed prior to prescribing.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Binge-Eating Disorder/drug therapy
Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage
Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Binge-Eating Disorder/physiopathology
Central Nervous System Stimulants/adverse effects
Central Nervous System Stimulants/pharmacokinetics
Drug Administration Schedule
Half-Life
Humans
Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate/adverse effects
Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate/pharmacokinetics
Methyldopa/metabolism
Norepinephrine/metabolism
Prodrugs
Severity of Illness Index
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Central Nervous System Stimulants); 0 (Prodrugs); 56LH93261Y (Methyldopa); SJT761GEGS (Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate); X4W3ENH1CV (Norepinephrine)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/17425255.2018.1420163

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[PMID]: 29413810
[Au] Autor:Curzio O; Maestro S; Rossi G; Calderoni S; Giombini L; Scardigli S; Ragione LD; Muratori F
[Ad] Address:Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Transdiagnostic vs. disorder-focused perspective in children and adolescents with eating disorders: Findings from a large multisite exploratory study.
[So] Source:Eur Psychiatry;49:81-93, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1778-3585
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The transdiagnostic model of eating disorders (ED) proposes common cognitive mechanisms in patients with ED psychopathology. Little is known about their role in the maintenance of ED in children and adolescents. This study aimed to determine whether the relationships between key factors (low self-esteem, weight and shape control, clinical perfectionism, interpersonal problems, distress and mood instability) and core maintaining mechanisms (binge-eating and restraint) would support a transdiagnostic theory in young patients. METHODS: A total of 419 patients (mean age 14.7 ±â€¯2.14 years; age range: 7-18 years; males 13.8%) diagnosed with an ED were assessed in six Italian clinical centers in 2013. Multiple comparisons between ED diagnosis, correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) were performed. RESULTS: Of the entire collective, 51.5% of patients were diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), 12.3% were diagnosed with Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and 36.2% with Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS). In PCA, the core ED mechanisms, dietary restraint and binge eating, acted as poles of attraction of the other variables. The AN group was particularly linked to restraint and the BN group was particularly related to "Bulimia". Considering the diagnostic subtypes, there were no significant differences between the anorexic binge-purging group, bulimic purging group and bulimic non-purging group, which constituted a unique cluster related to affective, interpersonal problems and to perfectionism, indicating a very homogeneous subgroup. Restricting anorexic group (AN-R), related to shape concern and anxious-depressed mood, was not linked to the other subtypes. EDNOS appeared to be opposed to the AN-R group; the binge eating disorder group appeared to be independent from others. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest the presence of both specific and transdiagnostic mechanisms in ED subtypes, whose knowledge is of relevance for clinical practice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 1445 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29275778
[Au] Autor:Barnes RD; Ivezaj V; Martino S; Pittman BP; Paris M; Grilo CM
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address: Rachel.Barnes@yale.edu.
[Ti] Title:Examining motivational interviewing plus nutrition psychoeducation for weight loss in primary care.
[So] Source:J Psychosom Res;104:101-107, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1360
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Our previous randomized controlled trial found that nutrition psychoeducation (NP), an attention-control condition, produced statistically significantly more weight loss than usual care (UC), whereas motivational interviewing (MI) did not. NP, MI, and UC resulted in medium-large, medium, and negligible effects on weight loss, respectively. To examine whether weight loss could be further improved by combining MI and NP, the current study evaluated the scalable combination (MINP) with accessible web-based materials. METHODS: 31 adults with overweight/obesity, with and without binge-eating disorder (BED), were enrolled in the 3-month MINP treatment in primary care. Participants were assessed at baseline, post, and 3-month follow-up. Mixed-model analyses examined MINP effects over time and the prognostic significance of BED. RESULTS: Mixed-model analyses revealed that percentage weight loss was statistically significant at post and 3-month follow-up; d'=0.59 and 0.53, respectively. BED status did not predict or moderate weight loss. Twenty-one percent (6 of 28) and 26% (7 of 27) of participants attained 5% weight loss by post-treatment and 3-month follow-up, respectively. Participants with BED had statistically significantly greater improvements in disordered eating and depression (in addition to binge-eating reductions) compared to those without BED. CONCLUSION: MINP resulted in weight and psychological improvements at post-treatment and through 3-months after treatment completion. There did not appear to be additional benefits to combining basic nutrition information with MI when compared to the previous randomized controlled trial testing nutrition psychoeducation alone. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02578199.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29215743
[Au] Autor:Lydecker JA; Shea M; Grilo CM
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States.
[Ti] Title:Driven exercise in the absence of binge eating: Implications for purging disorder.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;51(2):139-145, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Purging disorder (PD) is characterized by recurrent purging without objectively large binge-eating episodes. PD has received relatively little attention, and questions remain about the clinical significance of "purging" by exercise that is driven or compulsive (i.e., as extreme compensatory or weight-control behavior). The little available research suggests that individuals who use exercise as a compensatory behavior might have less eating-disorder psychopathology than those who purge by vomiting or laxatives, but those studies have had smaller sample sizes, defined PD using low-frequency thresholds, and defined exercise without weight-compensatory or driven elements. METHOD: Participants (N = 2,017) completed a web-based survey with established measures of eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and physical activity. Participants were categorized (regular compensatory driven exercise, PD-E, n = 297; regular compensatory vomiting/laxatives, PD-VL, n = 59; broadly defined anorexia nervosa, AN, n = 20; and no eating-disordered behaviors, NED, n = 1,658) and compared. RESULTS: PD-E, PD-VL, and AN had higher eating-disorder psychopathology and physical activity than NED but did not significantly differ from each other on most domains. PD-VL and AN had higher depression than PD-E, which was higher than NED. DISCUSSION: Findings suggest that among participants with regularly compensatory behaviors without binge eating, those who use exercise alone have similar levels of associated eating-disorder psychopathology as those who use vomiting/laxatives, although they have lower depression levels and overall frequency of purging. Findings provide further support for the clinical significance of PD. Clinicians and researchers should recognize the severity of driven exercise as a compensatory behavior, and the need for further epidemiological and treatment research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22811

  8 / 1445 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29345848
[Au] Autor:König HH; Bleibler F; Friederich HC; Herpertz S; Lam T; Mayr A; Schmidt F; Svaldi J; Zipfel S; Brettschneider C; Hilbert A; de Zwaan M; Egger N
[Ad] Address:Department of Health Economics and Health Services Research, Hamburg Center for Health Economics (HCHE), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Economic evaluation of cognitive behavioral therapy and Internet-based guided self-help for binge-eating disorder.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;51(2):155-164, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of individual face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) compared to therapist guided Internet-based self-help (GSH-I) in overweight or obese adults with binge-eating disorder (BED). METHOD: Analysis was conducted alongside the multicenter randomized controlled INTERBED trial. CBT (n = 76) consisted of up to 20 individual therapy sessions over 4 months. GSH-I (n = 71) consisted of 11 modules combining behavioral interventions, exercises including a self-monitoring food diary, psychoeducation, and 2 face-to-face coaching sessions over 4 months. Assessments at baseline, after 4 months (post-treatment), as well as 6 and 18 months after the end of treatment included health care utilization and sick leave days to calculate direct and indirect costs. Binge-free days (BFD) were calculated as effect measure based on the German version of the Eating Disorder Examination. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was determined, and net benefit regressions, adjusted for comorbidities and baseline differences, were used to derive cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. RESULTS: After controlling for baseline differences, CBT was associated with non-significantly more costs (+€2,539) and BFDs (+40.1) compared with GSH-I during the 22-month observation period, resulting in an adjusted ICER of €63 per additional BFD. CBTs probability of being cost-effective increased above 80% only if societal willingness to pay (WTP) was ≥€250 per BFD. DISCUSSION: We did not find clear evidence for one of the treatments being more cost-effective. CBT tends to be more effective but also more costly. If the societal WTP for an additional BFD is low, then our results suggest that GSH-I should rather be adopted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180202
[Lr] Last revision date:180202
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22822

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[PMID]: 29341203
[Au] Autor:Leehr EJ; Schag K; Dresler T; Grosse-Wentrup M; Hautzinger M; Fallgatter AJ; Zipfel S; Giel KE; Ehlis AC
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Tübingen, Internal Medicine VI, Osianderstraße 5, Tübingen, 72076, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Food specific inhibitory control under negative mood in binge-eating disorder: Evidence from a multimethod approach.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;51(2):112-123, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Inhibitory control has been discussed as a developmental and maintenance factor in binge-eating disorder (BED). The current study is the first aimed at investigating inhibitory control in a negative mood condition on a psychophysiological and behavioral level in BED with a combination of electroencephalography (EEG) and eye tracking (ET). METHOD: We conducted a combined EEG and ET study with overweight individuals with BED (BED+, n = 24, mean age = 31, mean BMI = 35 kg/m ) and without BED (BED-, n = 23, mean age = 28, mean BMI = 35 kg/m ) and a normal-weight (NWC, n = 26, mean age 28, mean BMI = 22 kg/m ) control group. We assessed self-report data regarding impulsivity and emotion regulation as well as the processing of food stimuli under negative mood in an antisaccade task. Main outcome variables comprise event-related potentials (ERP) regarding conflict processing (N2) and performance monitoring (error-related negativity [ERN/Ne]) assessed by EEG and inhibitory control (errors in the first and second saccade) assessed by ET. RESULTS: BED+ patients reported increased impulsivity and higher emotion regulation difficulties compared with the other groups. The eye tracking data revealed impaired inhibitory control in BED+ compared with both control groups. Further, we found preliminary evidence from EEG recordings that conflict processing might be less thorough in the BED+ sample as well as in the NWC sample. In the BED+ sample this might be connected to the inhibitory control deficits on behavioral level. While the BED- sample showed increased conflict processing latencies (N2 latencies), which might indicate a compensation mechanism, the BED+ sample did not show such a mechanism. Performance monitoring (ERN/Ne latencies and amplitudes) was not impaired in the BED+ sample compared with both control samples. DISCUSSION: Participants with BED reported higher impulsivity and lower emotion regulation capacities. The combined investigation of electrocortical processes and behavior contributes to an advanced understanding of behavioral and electrocortical processes underlying inhibitory control in BED. Inhibitory control and negative mood, probably amplified by emotion regulation deficits, should be addressed further in the investigation and treatment of BED.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180202
[Lr] Last revision date:180202
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22818

  10 / 1445 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29278426
[Au] Autor:Mitchison D; Rieger E; Harrison C; Murray SB; Griffiths S; Mond J
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Centre for Emotional Health, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Indicators of clinical significance among women in the community with binge-eating disorder symptoms: Delineating the roles of binge frequency, body mass index, and overvaluation.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;51(2):165-169, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the relative contributions of binge eating, body image disturbance, and body mass index (BMI) to distress and disability in binge-eating disorder (BED). METHOD: A community sample of 174 women with BED-type symptomatology provided demographic, weight, and height information, and completed measures of overvaluation of weight/shape and binge eating, general psychological distress and impairment in role functioning. Correlation and regression analyses examined the associations between predictors (binge eating, overvaluation, BMI), and outcomes (distress, functional impairment). RESULTS: Binge eating and overvaluation were moderately to strongly correlated with distress and functional impairment, whereas BMI was not correlated with distress and only weakly correlated with functional impairment. Regression analysis indicated that both overvaluation and binge eating were strong and unique predictors of both distress and impairment, the contribution of overvaluation to variance in functional impairment being particularly strong, whereas BMI did not uniquely predict functional impairment or distress. DISCUSSION: The findings support the inclusion of overvaluation as a diagnostic criterion or specifier in BED and the need to focus on body image disturbance in treatment and public health efforts in order to reduce the individual and community health burden of this condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180202
[Lr] Last revision date:180202
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22812


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