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[PMID]: 29438961
[Au] Autor:Westman JS; Stenfelt L; Vidovic K; Möller M; Hellberg Å; Kjellström S; Olsson ML
[Ad] Address:Division of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Biomedical Centre C14, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Allele-selective RUNX1 binding regulates P1 blood group status by transcriptional control of .
[So] Source:Blood;, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1528-0020
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:P1 and P are glycosphingolipid antigens synthesized by the -encoded α1,4-galactosyltransferase, using paragloboside and lactosylceramide as acceptor substrates, respectively. In addition to the compatibility aspects of these histo-blood group molecules, both constitute receptors for multiple microbes and toxins. Presence or absence of P1 antigen on erythrocytes determines the common P (P1+P +) and P (P1-P + ) phenotypes. transcript levels are higher in P individuals and SNPs in non-coding regions of , particularly rs5751348, correlate with P /P status. Despite these recent findings, the molecular mechanism underlying these phenotypes remains elusive. The In(Lu) phenotype is caused by haploinsufficiency and shows decreased P1 levels on erythrocytes. We therefore hypothesized KLF1 to regulate expression. Intriguingly, -specific sequences including rs5751348 revealed potential binding sites for several hematopoietic transcription factors, including KLF1. However, KLF1 binding did not explain P1-specific EMSA shifts and siRNA silencing of did not affect transcript levels. Instead, protein pull-down experiments using but not oligonucleotide probes identified RUNX1 by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, RUNX1 binds alleles selectively and knockdown of significantly decreased transcription. These data indicate that RUNX1 regulates and thereby the expression of clinically important glycosphingolipids implicated in blood-group incompatibility and host-pathogen interactions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 6008 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29294154
[Au] Autor:Choi SH; Kim KW; Kim SY; Kim JS; Kwon JH; Song GW; Lee SG
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology and the Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 88 Olympic-Ro 43-Gil, Songpa-Gu, Seoul, 138-736, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Computed tomography findings in ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation recipients with biliary strictures.
[So] Source:Eur Radiol;, 2018 Jan 02.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1084
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To evaluate CT findings of biliary strictures in ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) recipients, with emphasis on associated 1-month post-transplantation CT findings, and evaluate clinical outcomes. METHODS: Of 351 ABO-incompatible recipients, we retrospectively evaluated CT scans in 65 recipients with biliary stricture. The biliary strictures on CT scans were classified as type A (perihilar) and type B (diffuse). Precedent CT abnormality patterns and the presence of a periportal halo sign at 1-month post-transplantation were evaluated. For each patient, clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS: Of 65 ABO-incompatible recipients with biliary strictures, 36.9% had type B strictures. Compared with biliary strictures at diagnosis, similar CT abnormality patterns were observed for 84.4% in type A and 86.4% in type B strictures at 1-month post-transplantation. Complex periportal halo signs on the 1-month post-transplantation CT were more frequently noted for type B than type A strictures (86.4% vs. 3.1%, P < 0.001). Progressive clinical outcomes were more frequently observed for type B than type A strictures (79.2% vs. 26.8%, P < 0.001), with a significantly shorter graft survival time (46.4 months vs. 90.8 months, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: CT abnormality patterns and complex periportal halo signs on 1-month post-transplantation CT may be clinically useful for managing biliary strictures in ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients. Key Points • Of ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients, type B biliary stricture incidence was 6.8%. • Of type B strictures, 86.4% exhibited similar CT abnormality patterns at 1-month post-transplantation. • Complex periportal halo at 1 month was significantly associated with type B strictures. • Progressive clinical outcomes were more frequently observed in type B strictures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180102
[Lr] Last revision date:180102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00330-017-5226-9

  3 / 6008 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29194343
[Au] Autor:Huang GS; Hu MH; Lin TC; Lin YC; Tsai YT; Lin CY; Ke HY; Zheng XZ; Tsai CS
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Blood Mixing Upregulates Platelet Membrane-Bound CD40 Ligand Expression in vitro Independent of Abo Compatibility.
[So] Source:Shock;, 2017 Nov 30.
[Is] ISSN:1540-0514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Platelets play a central role in the inflammation response via CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression, which may lead to transfusion reactions. The precise role of platelet CD40L-mediated inflammation in transfusion reactions is unclear. Therefore, we assessed the effects of in vitro blood mixing on platelet CD40L expression. In addition, we examined the effect of ABO compatibility on CD40L expression. Donor packed red blood cells were acquired from a blood bank, and recipient blood was obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery and prepared as washed platelets. Donor blood was mixed with suspended, washed recipient platelets to obtain a final mixing ratio of 1%, 5%, or 10% (vol/vol). The blood mixtures were divided into three groups: Group M, cross-matched blood-type mixing (n = 20); Group S, ABO type-specific uncross-matched blood (n = 20); and Group I, ABO incompatibility (not ABO type-specific blood and not process cross-matched) mixing (n = 20). The blood mixtures were used to detect platelet membrane-bound CD40L expression by flow cytometry. Blood mixing resulted in an increase in CD40L expression in Group M (P < 0.001), Group S (P < 0.001), and Group I (P < 0.001). CD40L expression following blood mixing potentially led to a transfusion reaction in each of the groups. There were no differences in CD40L expression among the three groups (P = 0.988) correlated with ABO compatibility or incompatibility. This indicates that the reactions between red blood cell surface antigens and plasma antibodies do not play a role in the induction of CD40L expression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171201
[Lr] Last revision date:171201
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SHK.0000000000001068

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[PMID]: 29062250
[Au] Autor:Özcan M; Sevinç S; Erkan VB; Yurdugül Y; Sarici SÜ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Ufuk University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Hyperbilirubinemia due to minor blood group (anti-E) incompatibility in a newborn: a case report.
[So] Source:Turk Pediatri Ars;52(3):162-164, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1306-0015
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In addition to Rh and ABO incompatibilities subgroup incompatibilities may rarely play a role among the causes of hemolytic anemia and indirect hyperbilirubinemia in newborns. The most common minor blood group antigens that cause blood incompatibility between the mother and baby are C, c, E, e, Kell, Duffy, Diego, Kidd and MNSs antigens. In this article, a newborn in whom hyperbilirubinemia due to anti-E minor blood group incompatibility developed and was treated with phototherapy succesfully is presented and minor blood group incompatibilities due to anti-E are reviewed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5152/TurkPediatriArs.2017.2658

  5 / 6008 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28966502
[Au] Autor:Rai P; Sharma G; Singh D; Garg J
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Hospitals, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Rare presentation of mixed autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children: Report of 2 cases.
[So] Source:J Lab Physicians;9(4):332-336, 2017 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0974-2727
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Immune hemolytic anemia is characterized by clinical and laboratory features of hemolytic anemia with direct antiglobulin test (DAT) positivity. It could be autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), alloimmune, or drug-induced hemolysis based on the antigenic stimulus. Furthermore, based on thermal amplitude of autoantibody, AIHA is classified as warm (65%), cold (30%), and mixed (5%) type. Mixed AIHA is extremely rare in children and must be differentiated from warm AIHA with clinically insignificant cold agglutinins and cold hemagglutinin disease as their treatment is different. It may present as blood group discrepancy or cross-match incompatibility leading to delay in arranging suitable blood unit for transfusion. Therefore, a thorough immunohematology workup including monospecific DAT, indirect antiglobulin test at 4°C and 37°C, determination of thermal amplitude and titer is essential. We hereby present two pediatric cases of mixed AIHA presenting as ABO forward and reverse blood group discrepancy and cross-match incompatibility.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171005
[Lr] Last revision date:171005
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/JLP.JLP_95_17

  6 / 6008 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28931391
[Au] Autor:Jones KDJ; Grossman SE; Kumaranayakam D; Rao A; Fegan G; Aladangady N
[Ad] Address:Neonatal Unit, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Umbilical cord bilirubin as a predictor of neonatal jaundice: a retrospective cohort study.
[So] Source:BMC Pediatr;17(1):186, 2017 Sep 20.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hyperbilirubinaemia is a major cause of neonatal morbidity. Early identification of those infants most at risk might allow the development of targeted primary preventative therapy and follow-up. The objective of this study was to assess whether arterial umbilical cord bilirubin (aUCB) level at delivery predicts the development of neonatal jaundice in term deliveries. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of hospital biochemistry records identified term deliveries with recorded aUCB. Infant medical records were reviewed to identify those who developed neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia (requiring treatment according to UK NICE guidelines) with/without a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). RESULTS: Of 1411 term deliveries with a clearly recorded aUCB, 30 infants developed clinically-significant jaundice (2.7%), of whom 8 were DAT + ve (0.6%) mostly due to ABO incompatibility. aUCB strongly predicted the development of DAT + ve jaundice (area under the ROC curve = 0.996), as well as all-cause jaundice (area under the ROC curve = 0.74). However, this effect was critically dependent on maternal blood group. Amongst infants at risk of ABO incompatibility (maternal blood groups O + ve/O-ve, 39.7%) the predictive value of aUCB for all cause jaundice was strengthened (area under the ROC curve = 0.88). Amongst those not at risk (defined maternal blood group not O + ve/O-ve, 51.0%) it disappeared completely (area under the ROC curve = 0.46). A cutoff of 35 µmol/l for mothers with blood group O + ve/O-ve increased the pre-test probability for all-cause jaundice of 4% to a post-test probability of 30%. CONCLUSIONS: For infants of mothers with blood group O, aUCB predicts development of neonatal jaundice. There was no evident utility for infants of mothers with other blood groups. Estimation of aUCB should be considered as a strategy for early identification of those at risk of neonatal haemolytic jaundice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170925
[Lr] Last revision date:170925
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12887-017-0938-1

  7 / 6008 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28923282
[Au] Autor:Pereira N; Patel HH; Stone LD; Christos PJ; Elias RT; Spandorfer SD; Rosenwaks Z
[Ad] Address:The Ronald O. Perelman and Claudia Cohen Center for Reproductive Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. Electronic address: nip9060@med.cornell.edu.
[Ti] Title:Association between ABO blood type and live-birth outcomes in single-embryo transfer cycles.
[So] Source:Fertil Steril;108(5):791-797, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1556-5653
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between ABO blood type and live-birth outcomes in patients undergoing IVF with day 5 single-embryo transfer (SET). DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: University-affiliated center. PATIENT(S): Normal responders, <40 years old, undergoing their first IVF cycle with fresh SET. INTERVENTION(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Live-birth rate was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were birth weight and gestational age at delivery. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between blood type and live birth, while controlling for confounders. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for live birth were estimated. RESULT(S): A total of 2,329 patients were included. The mean age of the study cohort was 34.6 ± 4.78 years. The distribution of blood types was as follows: A = 897 (38.5%); B = 397 (17.0%); AB = 120 (5.2%); and, O = 1,915 (39.3%) patients. There was no difference in the baseline demographics, ovarian stimulation, or embryo quality parameters between the blood types. The unadjusted ORs for live birth when comparing blood type A (referent) with blood types B, AB, and O were 0.96 (95% CI, 0.6-1.7), 0.72 (95% CI, 0.4-1.2), and 0.96 (95% CI. 0.6-1.7), respectively. The adjusted ORs for live birth remained not significant when comparing blood type A to blood types B, AB, and O individually. No difference in birth weight or gestational age at delivery was noted among the four blood types. CONCLUSION(S): Our findings suggest that ABO blood type is not associated with live-birth rate, birth weight, or gestational age at delivery in patients undergoing IVF with day 5 SET.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: ABO Blood-Group System
Blastocyst
Blood Group Incompatibility/complications
Fertilization in Vitro
Infertility/therapy
Single Embryo Transfer
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Birth Weight
Blood Group Incompatibility/diagnosis
Embryo Implantation
Female
Fertility
Fertilization in Vitro/adverse effects
Gestational Age
Humans
Infertility/diagnosis
Infertility/physiopathology
Live Birth
Logistic Models
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications/etiology
Pregnancy Rate
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Single Embryo Transfer/adverse effects
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (ABO Blood-Group System)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171113
[Lr] Last revision date:171113
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170920
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 6008 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28846568
[Au] Autor:Huang GS; Hu MH; Lin TC; Tsai YT; Lin CY; Ke HY; Zheng XZ; Lin YC; Tsai CS
[Ad] Address:*Department of Anesthesiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan †Division of Pediatric General Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linko, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan ‡Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan §Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan ||Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan ¶¶Department and Graduate Institute of Pharmacology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan **Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taoyuan Armed Forces General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Impact of Blood Mixing and ABO Compatibility on Platelet-Leukocyte Aggregations and Platelet P-Selectin Expression: An In Vitro Study.
[So] Source:Shock;, 2017 Aug 25.
[Is] ISSN:1540-0514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Effects of blood transfusions on platelet-related and leukocyte-related inflammation are unclear. We simulated transfusion using in vitro blood mixing to evaluate platelet-leukocyte aggregations (PLA) and platelet P-selectin expression, and the mechanism of PLA. Donor packed red blood cells (pRBCs) were obtained from a blood bank. Recipient whole blood samples were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Blood sample mixtures were divided into four groups: group M, cross-matched blood type mixing; group O, donor type O with other blood type mixing (A, B, or AB); group S, ABO type-specific uncross-matched blood mixing; and group I, ABO incompatibility mixing. Donor pRBCs were added to recipient blood to reach 1%, 5%, and 10% (vol/vol) concentrations. Blood sample mixtures were analyzed to determine the PLA; P-selectin expression; and leukocyte CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 subunits of integrin expression. Analysis of variance tests were used to analyze differences. PLA significantly increased only in groups O and I (P = 0.003 and P < 0.001). Subpopulations of leukocytes significantly increased in all groups. There were no significant differences among the four groups (P = 0.578) in PLA increase. Although there was no significant effect on P-selectin expression (P = 1.000) and leukocyte CD11a and CD18 expression (P = 0.999, P = 0.422) within and between the groups, there was an increase in CD11b expression (P = 0.018). Blood mixing can increase PLA, especially in platelet-neutrophil and platelet-monocyte aggregations, possibly through nonhemolytic reactions. The CD11b integrin with CD18 may play a role in the formation of PLA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170828
[Lr] Last revision date:170828
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SHK.0000000000000972

  9 / 6008 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28840943
[Au] Autor:Zeller MP; Barty R; Aandahl A; Apelseth TO; Callum J; Dunbar NM; Elahie A; Garritsen H; Hancock H; Kutner JM; Manukian B; Mizuta S; Okuda M; Pagano MB; Poglód R; Rushford K; Selleng K; Sørensen CH; Sprogøe U; Staves J; Weiland T; Wendel S; Wood EM; van de Watering L; van Wordragen-Vlaswinkel M; Ziman A; Jan Zwaginga J; Murphy MF; Heddle NM; Yazer MH; Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusion (BEST) Collaborative
[Ad] Address:McMaster Centre for Transfusion Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
[Ti] Title:An international investigation into O red blood cell unit administration in hospitals: the GRoup O Utilization Patterns (GROUP) study.
[So] Source:Transfusion;57(10):2329-2337, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Transfusion of group O blood to non-O recipients, or transfusion of D- blood to D+ recipients, can result in shortages of group O or D- blood, respectively. This study investigated RBC utilization patterns at hospitals around the world and explored the context and policies that guide ABO blood group and D type selection practices. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study on transfusion data from the 2013 calendar year. This study included a survey component that asked about hospital RBC selection and transfusion practices and a data collection component where participants submitted information on RBC unit disposition including blood group and D type of unit and recipient. Units administered to recipients of unknown ABO or D group were excluded. RESULTS: Thirty-eight hospitals in 11 countries responded to the survey, 30 of which provided specific RBC unit disposition data. Overall, 11.1% (21,235/191,397) of group O units were transfused to non-O recipients; 22.6% (8777/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to O D+ recipients, and 43.2% (16,800/38,911) of group O D- RBC units were transfused to recipients that were not group O D-. Disposition of units and hospital transfusion policy varied within and across hospitals of different sizes, with transfusion of group O D- units to non-group O D- patients ranging from 0% to 33%. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of group O and D- RBC units were transfused to compatible, nonidentical recipients, although the frequency of this practice varied across sites.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Erythrocyte Transfusion/utilization
Erythrocytes/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: ABO Blood-Group System/immunology
Blood Group Incompatibility
Hospitals
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System/immunology
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (ABO Blood-Group System); 0 (Rh-Hr Blood-Group System)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171023
[Lr] Last revision date:171023
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170826
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/trf.14255

  10 / 6008 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28823294
[Au] Autor:Ding QL; Chen BL; Qiu F
[Ad] Address:Department of Blood Transfusion, The First Affiliated Hospital of Gannan Medical College, Ganzhou 341000, Jiangxi Province, China.
[Ti] Title:[Blood Transfusion Selection in Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Producing Class Antibodies].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Shi Yan Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi;25(4):1208-1211, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1009-2137
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To analyze the reasons for the incompatibility of cross matching in lymphoma patients complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), and to provide compatible blood to patients for multiple blood transfusion. METHODS: The test tube method was used for routine identification of ABO blood group, Rh typing and direct anti-globulin test; the patients antibody was identified by saline water method, micro column gel card; and the saline water method, Polybrene method and antiglobulin method were used for blood cross matching test of the patients. RESULTS: In the serum of the patient, positive autoantibodies were detected, in the elution, the Ce antibody was detected. After infusion of the corresponding antigen-negative blood, the patient's hemoglobin level was significantly improved. CONCLUSION: Only firstly accurately identifying antibodies existed in serum and elution, then selecting corresponding antigen negative blood, can ensure the safety and effectiveness of blood transfusion.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170821
[Lr] Last revision date:170821
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.7534/j.issn.1009-2137.2017.04.043


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