Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Bluetongue [Words]
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[PMID]: 29514261
[Au] Autor:Diaz F; Mangudo C; Spinelli GR; Gleiser RM; Ronderos MM
[Ad] Address:Centro de Estudios Parasitológicos y de Vectores (CEPAVE), Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo (UNLP), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Boulevard, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
[Ti] Title:The Immatures of Culicoides trilineatus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Potential Vector of the Bluetongue Virus.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The fourth instar larva and pupa of Culicoides trilineatus Fox (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae), a species considered as potential vector of the bluetongue virus in Central and South America, are described, illustrated, and photomicrographed for the first time by using binocular, phase-contrast, and scanning electron microscopy. The immatures were collected by using a siphon bottle in tree holes in Salta Province, Argentina, transported to the laboratory, and there reared to the adult's emergence. They are compared with the immatures of Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae), another Neotropical species that develops in tree holes. Details on larval biology and habitat are given.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjy029

  2 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29499711
[Au] Autor:Bournez L; Cavalerie L; Sailleau C; Bréard E; Zanella G; Servan de Almeida R; Pedarrieu A; Garin E; Tourette I; Dion F; Hendrikx P; Calavas D
[Ad] Address:ANSES (French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety), Unité de coordination et d'appui à la surveillance, Direction des laboratoires, Maisons Alfort, France. laure.bournez@anses.fr.
[Ti] Title:Estimation of French cattle herd immunity against bluetongue serotype 8 at the time of its re-emergence in 2015.
[So] Source:BMC Vet Res;14(1):65, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1746-6148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: From 2006 to 2010, France experienced two bluetongue epidemics caused by serotype 1 (BTV-1) and 8 (BTV-8) which were controlled by mass vaccination campaigns. After five years without any detected cases, a sick ram was confirmed in August 2015 to be infected by a BTV-8 strain almost identical to that circulating during the previous outbreak. By then, part of the French cattle population was expected to be still protected, since bluetongue antibodies are known to last for many years after natural infection or vaccination. The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of cattle in France still immune to BTV-8 at the time of its re-emergence in 2015. RESULTS: We used BTV group-specific cELISA results from 8525 cattle born before the vaccination ban in 2013 and 15,799 cattle born after the ban. Samples were collected from January to April 2016 to estimate seroprevalence per birth cohort. The overall seroprevalence in cattle at national and local levels was extrapolated from seroprevalence results per birth cohort and their respective proportion at each level. To indirectly assess pre-immune status of birth cohorts, we computed prevalence per birth cohort on infected farms in autumn 2015 using 1377 RT-PCR results. These revealed limited BTV circulation in 2015. Seroprevalence per birth cohort was likely to be connected to past exposure to natural infection and/or vaccination with higher seroprevalence levels in older animals. A seroprevalence of 95% was observed for animals born before 2008, of which > 90% were exposed to two compulsory vaccination campaigns in 2008-2010. None of the animals born before 2008 were found to be infected, unlike 19% of the young cattle which had never been vaccinated. This suggests that most ELISA-positive animals were pre-immune to BTV-8. We estimated that 18% (from 12% to 32% per département) of the French cattle population was probably pre-immune in 2015. CONCLUSIONS: These results strongly suggest a persistence of antibodies for at least 5-6 years after natural infection or vaccination. The herd immunity of the French cattle population probably limited BTV circulation up to 2015, by which time more than 80% of cattle were naive.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12917-018-1388-1

  3 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29386141
[Au] Autor:Lorusso A; Sghaier S; Di Domenico M; Barbria ME; Zaccaria G; Megdich A; Portanti O; Seliman IB; Spedicato M; Pizzurro F; Carmine I; Teodori L; Mahjoub M; Mangone I; Leone A; Hammami S; Marcacci M; Savini G
[Ad] Address:OIE Reference Laboratory for Bluetongue, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell'Abruzzo e del Molise (IZSAM), Teramo, Italy; National Reference Center for Whole Genome Sequencing of microbial pathogens: database and bioinformatic analysis, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell'Abruzzo e del
[Ti] Title:Analysis of bluetongue serotype 3 spread in Tunisia and discovery of a novel strain related to the bluetongue virus isolated from a commercial sheep pox vaccine.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;59:63-71, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bluetongue (BT), is one of the OIE-listed major diseases of ruminants. Following the official report of BT virus serotype 3 (BTV-3) in a sheep in Cap Bon (Tunisia), blood and serum samples of ruminants were collected from some areas of Tunisia to further investigate the presence of this virus in the country. A quantitative real time RT-PCR has been first developed for the detection and quantitation of BTV-3 RNA from field specimens. Out of 62 collected blood samples, 23 were shown to be positive for BTV-3 RNA. Isolation on cell cultures was also possible from six samples. Genome sequencing revealed the circulation of two unrelated western strains of BTV-3, one circulating in Cap Bon and neighboring areas, and the other circulating nearby the border with Libya. The presence of a putative novel BTV serotype (BTV-Y TUN2017) in sheep introduced from Libya to Tunisia, genomically related to the BTV strain contaminating a commercially-available sheep pox vaccine and to BTV-26, has been also demonstrated. This finding highlights the pressing need for a prompt production and release of a novel inactivated BTV-3 vaccine to be used in case of emergence or proactively in the areas of Southern Europe at major risk of BTV introduction. The assessment of a novel vaccine will certainly exalt the role and importance of surveillance activities and collaboration with Northern African countries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29182770
[Au] Autor:Wong ND; McDermott EG; Murillo AC; Mullens BA
[Ad] Address:Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, California.
[Ti] Title:Field Distribution and Density of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Eggs in Dairy Wastewater Habitats.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;55(2):392-397, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is a key bluetongue virus vector in the United States. Immatures occur in mud near the edges of wastewater ponds and are understudied targets for control efforts. Eggs of C. sonorensis were collected in the morning from a dairy wastewater pond bank by taking 5-ml surface mud samples along four transects on each of six dates. Surface mud samples parallel to waterline (10-cm long, 1-cm wide, and 0.5-cm deep) were removed at 5-cm increments ranging from 15 cm below waterline up to 25 cm above waterline. Eggs were removed using MgSO4 flotation, held on moist filter paper, and scored for hatching over 3 d. Eggs hatching on days 2 and 3 were assumed to have been laid on the test night. Water levels were stable within a night according to time-lapse camera photos. Most samples from below the waterline had no eggs and were not analyzed statistically. Mean (±SE) sample moisture (25.8 ± 2.1 at 5 cm above waterline and 19.8 ± 2.6% at 25 cm above waterline) did not vary significantly by position above waterline. The highest density of viable eggs (21 eggs/5 ml), proportion of mud samples positive for viable eggs (75%), and proportion of eggs hatching (80%) were found 5 cm above waterline. Oviposition in the few hours after sunset is adaptive, allowing eggs to age, develop the serosal cuticle, and resist later desiccation. As a potential control method, reducing water levels after midnight would encourage young egg desiccation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjx203

  5 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29482593
[Au] Autor:Cuéllar AC; Kjær LJ; Kirkeby C; Skovgard H; Nielsen SA; Stockmarr A; Andersson G; Lindstrom A; Chirico J; Lühken R; Steinke S; Kiel E; Gethmann J; Conraths FJ; Larska M; Hamnes I; Sviland S; Hopp P; Brugger K; Rubel F; Balenghien T; Garros C; Rakotoarivony I; Allène X; Lhoir J; Chavernac D; Delécolle JC; Mathieu B; Delécolle D; Setier-Rio ML; Venail R; Scheid B; Chueca MÁM; Barceló C; Lucientes J; Estrada R; Mathis A; Tack W; Bødker R
[Ad] Address:Division for Diagnostics and Scientific Advice, National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Copenhagen, Denmark. anacu@vet.dtu.dk.
[Ti] Title:Spatial and temporal variation in the abundance of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in nine European countries.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):112, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV), African horse sickness virus and Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Outbreaks of both BTV and SBV have affected large parts of Europe. The spread of these diseases depends largely on vector distribution and abundance. The aim of this analysis was to identify and quantify major spatial patterns and temporal trends in the distribution and seasonal variation of observed Culicoides abundance in nine countries in Europe. METHODS: We gathered existing Culicoides data from Spain, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Poland. In total, 31,429 Culicoides trap collections were available from 904 ruminant farms across these countries between 2007 and 2013. RESULTS: The Obsoletus ensemble was distributed widely in Europe and accounted for 83% of all 8,842,998 Culicoides specimens in the dataset, with the highest mean monthly abundance recorded in France, Germany and southern Norway. The Pulicaris ensemble accounted for only 12% of the specimens and had a relatively southerly and easterly spatial distribution compared to the Obsoletus ensemble. Culicoides imicola Kieffer was only found in Spain and the southernmost part of France. There was a clear spatial trend in the accumulated annual abundance from southern to northern Europe, with the Obsoletus ensemble steadily increasing from 4000 per year in southern Europe to 500,000 in Scandinavia. The Pulicaris ensemble showed a very different pattern, with an increase in the accumulated annual abundance from 1600 in Spain, peaking at 41,000 in northern Germany and then decreasing again toward northern latitudes. For the two species ensembles and C. imicola, the season began between January and April, with later start dates and increasingly shorter vector seasons at more northerly latitudes. CONCLUSION: We present the first maps of seasonal Culicoides abundance in large parts of Europe covering a gradient from southern Spain to northern Scandinavia. The identified temporal trends and spatial patterns are useful for planning the allocation of resources for international prevention and surveillance programmes in the European Union.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2706-y

  6 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29392882
[Au] Autor:Marcacci M; Sant S; Mangone I; Goria M; Dondo A; Zoppi S; van Gennip RGP; Radaelli MC; Cammà C; van Rijn PA; Savini G; Lorusso A
[Ad] Address:OIE Reference Laboratory for Bluetongue, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell'Abruzzo e del Molise (IZSAM), Teramo, Italy.
[Ti] Title:One after the other: A novel Bluetongue virus strain related to Toggenburg virus detected in the Piedmont region (North-western Italy), extends the panel of novel atypical BTV strains.
[So] Source:Transbound Emerg Dis;65(2):370-374, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1865-1682
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this rapid communication, a novel atypical bluetongue virus (BTV) strain detected in goats in the Piedmont region (north-western Italy) is described. This strain, BTV-Z ITA2017, is most related in Seg-2/VP-2 (83.8% nt/82.7% aa) to strain TOV of BTV-25. Reactive antisera of goats positive by cELISA for BTV antibodies failed to neutralize a chimeric virus expressing the outermost protein of TOV. Infected animals displayed low levels of RNAemia and absence of clinical signs consistent with bluetongue infection, a scenario described in animals infected with atypical BTV strains.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/tbed.12822

  7 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29363572
[Au] Autor:Pinior B; Firth CL; Loitsch A; Stockreiter S; Hutter S; Richter V; Lebl K; Schwermer H; Käsbohrer A
[Ad] Address:Institute for Veterinary Public Health, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:Cost distribution of bluetongue surveillance and vaccination programmes in Austria and Switzerland (2007-2016).
[So] Source:Vet Rec;182(9):257, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an emerging transboundary disease in Europe, which can cause significant production losses among ruminants. The analysis presented here assessed the costs of BTV surveillance and vaccination programmes in Austria and Switzerland between 2007 and 2016. Costs were compared with respect to time, type of programme, geographical area and who was responsible for payment. The total costs of the BTV vaccination and surveillance programmes in Austria amounted to €23.6 million, whereas total costs in Switzerland were €18.3 million. Our analysis demonstrates that the costs differed between years and geographical areas, both within and between the two countries. Average surveillance costs per animal amounted to approximately €3.20 in Austria compared with €1.30 in Switzerland, whereas the average vaccination costs per animal were €6.20 in Austria and €7.40 in Switzerland. The comparability of the surveillance costs is somewhat limited, however, due to differences in each nation's surveillance (and sampling) strategy. Given the importance of the export market for cattle production, investments in such programmes are more justified for Austria than for Switzerland. The aim of the retrospective assessment presented here is to assist veterinary authorities in planning and implementing cost-effective and efficient control strategies for emerging livestock diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.104448

  8 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29243405
[Au] Autor:Bréard E; Schulz C; Sailleau C; Bernelin-Cottet C; Viarouge C; Vitour D; Guillaume B; Caignard G; Gorlier A; Attoui H; Gallois M; Hoffmann B; Zientara S; Beer M
[Ad] Address:Laboratoire de Santé Animale d'Alfort, Université Paris Est, ANSES, ENVA, INRA, UMR 1161 VIROLOGIE, Maisons-Alfort, France.
[Ti] Title:Bluetongue virus serotype 27: Experimental infection of goats, sheep and cattle with three BTV-27 variants reveal atypical characteristics and likely direct contact transmission BTV-27 between goats.
[So] Source:Transbound Emerg Dis;65(2):e251-e263, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1865-1682
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bluetongue virus (BTV) hitherto consisted of 26 recognized serotypes, of which all except BTV-26 are primarily transmitted by certain species of Culicoides biting midges. Three variants of an additional 27th bluetongue virus serotype (BTV-27v01-v03) were recently detected in asymptomatic goats in Corsica, France, 2014-2015. Molecular characterization revealed genetic differences between the three variants. Therefore, in vivo characteristics were investigated by experimental infection of a total of 15 goats, 11 sheep and 4 cattle with any one of the three variants in separated animal trials. In goat trials, BTV-naïve animals of the same species were kept in a facility where direct contact was unhindered. Of the 15 inoculated goats, 13 and 14 animals were found positive for BTV-RNA and antibodies (Ab), respectively, until the end of the experiments. Surprisingly, BTV-Ab levels as measured with ELISA and neutralization test (SNT) were remarkably low in all seropositive goats. Virus isolation from whole-blood was possible at the peak of viremia until 49 dpi. Moreover, detection of BTV-27v02-RNA and Ab in one contact goat indicated that-similar to BTV-26-at least one of three BTV-27 variants may be transmitted by contact between goats. In the field, BTV-27 RNA can be detected up to 6 months in the whole-blood of BTV-27-infected Corsican goats. In contrast, BTV RNA was not detected in the blood of cattle or sheep. In addition, BTV-27 Abs were not detected in cattle and only a transient increase in Ab levels was observed in some sheep. None of the 30 animals showed obvious BT-like clinical signs. In summary, the phenotypes observed for BTV-27v01-v03 phenotypes correspond to a mixture of characteristics known for BTV-25 and 26.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/tbed.12780

  9 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29302776
[Au] Autor:Kardjadj M
[Ad] Address:Ecole Supérieure en Sciences de l'Aliment et des Industries Agro-alimentaire, Algiers, Algeria. drkardjadj@live.fr.
[Ti] Title:Epidemiological situation of transboundary animal diseases in North African countries-proposition of a regional control strategy.
[So] Source:Trop Anim Health Prod;50(3):459-467, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1573-7438
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) defined transboundary animal diseases (TADs) as those that are of significant economic, trade, and food security importance for a considerable number of countries. TADs can easily spread to other countries, reach epidemic proportions, and where control, management, or exclusion is required cooperation between several countries. The North African countries are vulnerable to several TADs by virtue of its geographical location, its borders with the Sahel region, and peculiar control constraints on the budgets of the national veterinary services of each country and on the livelihoods of livestock owners across the region. In a narrative approach, we comprehensively described the epidemiology of TADs in North African countries, eradication constraints and control measures adopted to conclude with a proposition of a regional control strategy. Our review uncovered foot-and-mouth disease, peste des petites ruminants, bluetongue, sheep/goats pox, brucellosis, West Nile and Rift Valley fever, as the major TADs in this region, while the major constraints identified were illegal animal movement, communal clashes, unreported outbreaks, poor vaccination coverage, and other factors peculiar to each etiology. Therefore, the establishment of early warning systems and proper implementation of control measures at regional level are highly recommended to the relevant stakeholders involved in TADs control in the region.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11250-017-1453-y

  10 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29422081
[Au] Autor:Abera T; Bitew M; Gebre D; Mamo Y; Deneke Y; Nandi S
[Ad] Address:Jimma University, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Jimma, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Bluetongue disease in small ruminants in south western Ethiopia: cross-sectional sero-epidemiological study.
[So] Source:BMC Res Notes;11(1):112, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1756-0500
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The status of bluetongue disease, vectors for transmission of the disease and the serotypes involved are not clearly known in Ethiopia. This sero-epidemiological study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and associated risk factors of bluetongue in small ruminants of South Western Ethiopia. RESULT: 422 serum samples were screened for the presence of bluetongue virus (BTV) specific antibodies using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) and 30.6% (129/422) (confidence interval CI 26.2-35%) of the sheep and goat serum samples were found positive. Multivariate analysis of several risk factors like age, sex, altitude, body condition and species of animals were studied and it was observed that species of animals, age and altitude had significant influence (P < 0.05) on seropositivity to BTV. Goats showed more seropositivity to bluetongue as compared to sheep [AOR = 2.4, 95% CI (1.5-3.9), P = 0.001], adult animals were more seropositive [AOR = 3.1, 95% CI (1.9-5.1), P = 0.001] than other age groups and animals at the lowland [AOR = 3.1, 95% CI (1.5-6.4), P = 0.002] showed more seropositivity to bluetongue than midland and high land. Sex and body condition of the animals had no statistically significant (P > 0.05) effect on seropositivity to bluetongue.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13104-018-3222-z


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