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[PMID]: 28453238
[Au] Autor:Osman OT; Souid AK; Al-Mugaddam F; Eapen BR; Jafferany M
[Ad] Address:College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, PO Box 17666, Alain, Abu Dhabi 00000, United Arab Emirates. ossamao@uaeu.ac.ae.
[Ti] Title:Attentiveness of Dermatologists in the Middle East to Psychocutaneous Medicine.
[So] Source:Prim Care Companion CNS Disord;19(2), 2017 Apr 27.
[Is] ISSN:2155-7780
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Patients with skin diseases often have psychological problems and complications that require assessment and treatment. The main objective of this study was to explore attentiveness of dermatologists to psychiatric symptoms in their patients. Methods: A previously validated online questionnaire was used to explore the attitude and experience of dermatologists practicing in the Middle East toward the assessment of the psychiatric needs of their patients. The survey also inquired about awareness of available resources in dealing with psychodermatology. This online survey was conducted between October 2011 and October 2012. Results: Of 70 invited dermatologists, 57 (81%) completed the survey. Fifteen respondents (31%) received no training and had attended no educational events on psychodermatology. Only 19 respondents (33%) were able to identify psychodermatology as psychiatric components of skin diseases and dermatologic symptoms of psychiatric disorders. Twenty respondents (41%) reported frequent experience with psychodermatology, and 14 (28%) were "very comfortable" in diagnosing and treating psychodermatology patients. Twenty-two respondents (47%) recognized psychocutaneous involvement in 10% to 25% of their patients, while 18 (36%) recognized it in < 10% of their patients. Recognized diagnoses that required referral for psychiatric assessment included trichotillomania (34%), delusion of parasitosis (22%), depression (18%), dysmorphophobias (16%), dermatitis (10%), and venereophobia (10%). Forty-five respondents (90%) were unaware of psychodermatology resources. The majority of respondents expressed interest in education on depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, and body dysmorphic disorder. Conclusions: Psychocutaneous involvements are common among dermatologic patients. A large number of the surveyed dermatologists had no training or education in psychodermatology. A lack of familiarity with patient and family resources on psychocutaneous conditions was also evident. These findings support the need for improvement in training and education in psychodermatology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Attention
Dermatologists/psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Mental Disorders/diagnosis
Skin Diseases/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders/complications
Middle Aged
Middle East
Skin Diseases/complications
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4088/PCC.16m02080

  2 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28463345
[Au] Autor:Upadhyaya MA; Nasrallah HA
[Ad] Address:The Everest Foundation, Los Angeles, CA USA E-mail: mupadhya@bronxleb.org
[Ti] Title:The intense desire for healthy limb amputation: A dis-proprioceptive neuropsychiatric disorder.
[So] Source:Ann Clin Psychiatry;29(2):125-132, 2017 05.
[Is] ISSN:1547-3325
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The first mention of a condition in which apparently nonpsychotic individuals have a strong, unrelenting desire to amputate ≥1 of their healthy limbs was published nearly 4 decades ago. Once dismissed as a paraphilia, the condition in recent years has been re-investigated with neurologic testing and imaging, yielding evidence suggesting it may be attributable to a neuroanatomical anomaly. METHODS: A literature review of data was conducted of recently published studies with pinprick testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/functional MRI imaging, magnetoencephalography, and interviews of individuals with a desire for limb amputation. RESULTS: Published literature on this condition features studies with a limited number of participants. However, the results indicate that affected individuals predominantly desire amputation of the left lower limb, and correspondingly, usually have changes in cortical thickness in the right parietal lobe. CONCLUSIONS: Further investigation of this condition is warranted, particularly, more research into the precise nature of the anomalous neuroanatomy, biopsychosocial background of those with the condition, and longitudinal perspective of the childhood onset and evolution of symptoms. Large sample studies involving a collaborative effort across multiple sites are required.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Amputation/psychology
Body Dysmorphic Disorders
Neuroanatomical Tract-Tracing Techniques/methods
Somatosensory Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Body Dysmorphic Disorders/pathology
Body Dysmorphic Disorders/psychology
Functional Laterality
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods
Neuropsychological Tests
Somatosensory Disorders/pathology
Somatosensory Disorders/psychology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29395883
[Au] Autor:Vergier J; Marquant E; Busa T; Reynaud R
[Ad] Address:Service de pédiatrie multidisciplinaire, hôpital Timone Enfants, Assistance publique des hôpitaux de Marseille, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille, France. Electronic address: julia.vergier@ap-hm.fr.
[Ti] Title:Exploration d'une avance staturale chez l'enfant : conduite à tenir pratique, principales étiologies à évoquer. [Investigation of tall stature in children: Diagnostic work-up, review of the main causes].
[So] Source:Arch Pediatr;25(2):163-169, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1769-664X
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Tall stature is not a common motive for medical consultation, even though by definition 2.5 % of children in the general population are concerned. It is usually defined as height greater than+2 standard deviations (SD) using the appropriate growth chart for age and gender, or a difference greater than +2 SD between actual height and target height. With a patient presenting tall stature, the physician has to determine whether it is a benign feature or a disease. Indeed, making the diagnosis is essential for hormonal disease or genetic overgrowth syndromes. The past medical history including parents' height, prenatal and birth data, physical examination along with anthropometry (height, weight, head circumference, body mass index), and growth chart evaluation with the detailed growth pattern are generally sufficient to make the diagnosis such as familial tall stature, obesity, or early puberty. Bone age estimation may be helpful for some specific etiologies and is also necessary to help predict final adult height. After exclusion of common causes, further investigation is required. Sudden growth acceleration often reveals endocrine pathology such as early puberty, hyperthyroidism, or acrogigantism. Tall stature accompanied by dysmorphic features, congenital malformations, developmental delay, or a family medical history may be related to genetic disorders such as Marfan, Sotos, or Wiedemann-Beckwith syndromes. We relate here the most frequent etiologies of overgrowth syndromes.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29336012
[Au] Autor:López-Solà C; Bui M; Hopper JL; Fontenelle LF; Davey CG; Pantelis C; Alonso P; van den Heuvel OA; Harrison BJ
[Ad] Address:Adult Mental Health Department, Parc Taulí University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Sabadell, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Predictors and consequences of health anxiety symptoms: a novel twin modeling study.
[So] Source:Acta Psychiatr Scand;137(3):241-251, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0447
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The question of how to best conceptualize health anxiety (HA) from a diagnostic and etiological perspective remains debated. The aim was to examine the relationship between HA and the symptoms of anxiety and obsessive-compulsive-related disorders in a normative twin population. METHOD: Four hundred and ninety-six monozygotic adult twin pairs from the Australian Twin Registry participated in the study (age, 34.4 ± 7.72 years; 59% females). Validated scales were used to assess each domain. We applied a twin regression methodology-ICE FALCON-to determine whether there was evidence consistent with 'causal' relationships between HA and other symptoms by fitting and comparing model estimates. RESULTS: Estimates were consistent with higher levels of obsessing ('unwanted thoughts') (P = 0.008), social anxiety (P = 0.03), and body dysmorphic symptoms (P = 0.008) causing higher levels of HA symptoms, and with higher levels of HA symptoms causing higher levels of physical/somatic anxiety symptoms (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Obsessional thoughts, body dysmorphic concerns, and social anxiety symptoms may have a causal influence on HA. To report physical/somatic anxiety appears to be a consequence of the underlying presence of HA-related fears. Should our results be confirmed by longitudinal studies, the evaluation and treatment of HA may benefit from the consideration of these identified risk factors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/acps.12850

  5 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29405915
[Au] Autor:Abramowitz JS
[Ad] Address:University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Electronic address: jabramowitz@unc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Presidential Address: Are the Obsessive-Compulsive Related Disorders Related to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder? A Critical Look at DSM-5's New Category.
[So] Source:Behav Ther;49(1):1-11, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1878-1888
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The 5 edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) includes a new class of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs) that includes obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and a handful of other putatively related conditions. Although this new category promises to raise awareness of underrecognized and understudied problems, the empirical validity and practical utility of this new DSM category is questionable. This article critically examines the arguments underlying the new OCRD class, illuminates a number of problems with this class, and then discusses implications for clinicians and researchers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28470486
[Au] Autor:Lavender JM; Brown TA; Murray SB
[Ad] Address:Eating Disorders Center for Treatment & Research, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, 4510 Executive Drive, Suite 315, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA. jlavender@ucsd.edu.
[Ti] Title:Men, Muscles, and Eating Disorders: an Overview of Traditional and Muscularity-Oriented Disordered Eating.
[So] Source:Curr Psychiatry Rep;19(6):32, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1535-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is growing recognition that eating disorder (ED) symptoms, particularly those of a muscularity-oriented nature, are more common in men than previously understood. The purpose of the current review is to describe contemporary directions and implications of research on traditional and muscularity-oriented ED symptoms among males. RECENT FINDINGS: Evidence indicates that ED symptoms occur in a substantial minority of men. Importantly, recent research has focused on muscularity-oriented body image and disordered eating in males, demonstrating the prevalence, correlates, and consequences of maladaptive muscularity-oriented attitudes and behaviors. A growing number of assessments are available to measure these constructs in males, and preliminary treatment considerations have begun to be addressed in the literature. Research on male EDs and body image is increasingly focusing on muscularity-oriented manifestations. Continued empirical work will be critical to improve our understanding of the onset, maintenance, and treatment of muscularity-oriented disordered eating in males.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Body Dysmorphic Disorders/psychology
Body Image/psychology
Feeding and Eating Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Attitude to Health
Body Dysmorphic Disorders/diagnosis
Disease Management
Feeding and Eating Disorders/diagnosis
Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology
Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy
Humans
Male
Muscle, Skeletal
Psychological Techniques
Sex Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180110
[Lr] Last revision date:180110
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11920-017-0787-5

  7 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29251748
[Au] Autor:Müller EI
[Ti] Title:Verstoord lichaamsbeeld: een cultuur-historische vergelijking tussen de glasziekte en de morfodysfore stoornis. [Disturbances of the body image: a cultural and historical comparison between the glass delusion and body dysmorphic disorder].
[So] Source:Tijdschr Psychiatr;59(12):759-766, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0303-7339
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:dut
[Ab] Abstract:background Research on body dysmorphic disorder (bdd) shows that many debates in the field of psychology, sociology and philosophy already focus on the ways 'ideals of the perfect body' influence this disorder. However, more work needs to be done on the question in what ways bdd is culturally, historically and technologically mediated. AIM: To argue that norms and values of the perfect body and the ways a society prescribes how body and mind should be related, are technologically mediated through different time frames, which influence disorders of disturbances of the body image. METHOD: Literature study. RESULTS: A cultural and historical comparison between the glass delusion and body dysmorphic disorder. CONCLUSION: It's impossible to state that the glass delusion and bdd are similar disorders regarding the types of patients or their symptoms. However, by comparing the relationships between the notion of a disturbed body image, and the technological mediation of cultural norms and values of the perfect body, both diseases in fact do have something in common.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180109
[Lr] Last revision date:180109
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29202381
[Au] Autor:Greenberg JL; Weingarden H; Reuman L; Abrams D; Mothi SS; Wilhelm S
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Simches Research Building 185 Cambridge Street, Suite 2000, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: jlgreenberg@mgh.harvard.edu.
[Ti] Title:Set shifting and visuospatial organization deficits in body dysmorphic disorder.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;260:182-186, 2017 Nov 24.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) over-attend to perceived defect(s) in their physical appearance, often becoming "stuck" obsessing about perceived flaws and engaging in rituals to hide flaws. These symptoms suggest that individuals with BDD may experience deficits in underlying neurocognitive functions, such as set-shifting and visuospatial organization. These deficits have been implicated as risk and maintenance factors in disorders with similarities to BDD but have been minimally investigated in BDD. The present study examined differences in neurocognitive functions among BDD participants (n = 20) compared to healthy controls (HCs; n = 20). Participants completed neuropsychological assessments measuring set-shifting (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Intra-Extra Dimensional Set Shift [IED] task) and visuospatial organization and memory (Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test [ROCF]). Results revealed a set-shifting deficit among BDD participants compared to HCs on the IED. On the ROCF, BDD participants exhibited deficits in visuospatial organization compared to HCs, but they did not differ in visuospatial memory compared to HCs. Results did not change when accounting for depression severity. Findings highlight neurocognitive deficits as potential endophenotype markers of clinical features (i.e., delusionality). Understanding neuropsychological deficits may clarify similarities and differences between BDD and related disorders and may guide targets for BDD treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171204
[Lr] Last revision date:171204
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29099545
[Au] Autor:Jafferany M; Osuagwu FC
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Central Michigan University College of Medicine, 1000 Houghton Ave, Saginaw, MI 48602. Jaffe1m@cmich.edu.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of the Body Parts That Preoccupy Adolescents With Body Dysmorphic Disorder.
[So] Source:Prim Care Companion CNS Disord;19(5), 2017 Oct 26.
[Is] ISSN:2155-7780
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: To evaluate which body parts preoccupy adolescents with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Methods: Patients admitted to an inpatient psychiatric hospital who agreed to take part in the study completed the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (child and adolescent version) and Body Dysmorphic Disorder Diagnostic Module. Patients also completed a questionnaire that addressed age at onset, coping strategies, history of sexual abuse, amount of time patients spent thinking about their perceived defects, and the area of the body that the participants were preoccupied with and the specific coping strategy used. All patients met DSM-5 criteria for BDD. The study was conducted from January 17, 2014, to September 29, 2014. Results: Patients with BDD (N = 17) were preoccupied with the face: 6 (35.2%), skin: 3 (17.6%), lips: 5 (29.4%), nose: 3 (17.6%), teeth: 3 (17.6%), ears: 1 (5.8%), and eyes: 1 (5.8%), while gender-specific parts included breasts: 5 (50%) and penis: 4 (57.1%). The mean age at onset of BDD was 10.5 years, and the time spent thinking about the imagined defect averaged 3.5 hours per day. Conclusions: Patients with BDD are more preoccupied with exposed facial body parts such as skin, lips, nose, teeth, ears, and eyes and body parts with sexual connotations such as breasts in females and the penis in males.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 1346 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29075327
[Au] Autor:Su J; Wang J; Fan X; Fu C; Zhang S; Zhang Y; Qin Z; Li H; Luo J; Li C; Jiang T; Shen Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Genetic and Metabolic Central Laboratory, Guangxi Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Guangxi Birth Defects Prevention and Control Institute, No 59, Xiangzhu Road, Nanning, China.
[Ti] Title:Mosaic UPD(7q)mat in a patient with silver Russell syndrome.
[So] Source:Mol Cytogenet;10:36, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1755-8166
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is one of the imprinting disorders characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth restriction, relative macrocephaly, body asymmetry and characteristic facial features. ~ 10% of SRS cases are known to be associated with maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (UPD(7)mat). Mosaic maternal segmental UPD of 7q (UPD(7q)mat) is very rare, had only been described in one case before. CASE PRESENTATION: We reported a second case of mosaic segmental UPD involving 7q. The patient presented with dysmorphic features including thin and short stature, triangular face, moderate protruding forehead, relative macrocephaly, fifth toe clinodactyly and irregular teeth, meeting the clinical diagnosed criteria of SRS. This case indicated that ~ 80% of mosaic UPD(7q)mat lead to the manifestation of main phenotypes of Silver-Russell syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Our case support the notion that there are genes control postnatal growth on long arm of chromosome 7 and indicate that ~ 80% of UPD(7q)mat mosaicism level was contributed to the SRS phenotype.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171029
[Lr] Last revision date:171029
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13039-017-0337-1


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