Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 25834575
[Au] Autor:Si J; Dai J; Zhang J; Liu S; Gu J; Shi J; Shen SG; Guo L
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Science, Ninth People's Hospital College of Stomatology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Shanghai 200011, China....
[Ti] Title:Comparative investigation of human amniotic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells for application in bone tissue engineering.
[So] Source:Stem Cells Int;2015:565732, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1687-966X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Emerging evidence suggests amniotic epithelial cells (AECs) as a promising source of progenitor cells in regenerative medicine and bone tissue engineering. However, investigations comparing the regenerative properties of AECs with other sources of stem cells are particularly needed before the feasibility of AECs in bone tissue engineering can be determined. This study aimed to compare human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs), human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs), and human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) in terms of their morphology, proliferation, immunophenotype profile, and osteogenic capacity in vitro and in vivo. Not only greatly distinguished by cell morphology and proliferation, hAECs, hAFMSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited remarkably different signature regarding immunophenotypical profile. Microarray analysis revealed a different expression profile of genes involved in ossification along the three cell sources, highlighting the impact of different anatomical origin and molecular response to osteogenic induction on the final tissue-forming potential. Furthermore, our data indicated a potential role of FOXC2 in early osteogenic commitment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150402
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2015/565732

  2 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25204389
[Au] Autor:Abreu SC; Antunes MA; Mendonça L; Branco VC; de Melo EB; Olsen PC; Diaz BL; Weiss DJ; Paredes BD; Xisto DG; Morales MM; Rocco PR
[Ti] Title:Effects of bone marrow mononuclear cells from healthy or ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation donors on recipient allergic asthma mice.
[So] Source:Stem Cell Res Ther;5(5):108, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1757-6512
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Asthma is characterized by a chronic inflammatory process which may lead to several changes in bone marrow cell composition. We hypothesized that bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) obtained from ovalbumin (OVA)-induced lung inflammation mice may promote different effects compared to BMMCs from healthy donors in a model of allergic asthma. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to two groups. In the OVA group, mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin, while healthy animals (control group) received saline using the same protocol. BMMCs were analyzed by flow cytometry 24 hours after the last challenge. After BMMC characterization, another group of OVA mice were further randomized into three subgroups to receive intratracheal saline (BMMC-SAL), BMMCs from control or BMMCs from OVA mice (BMMC-Control and BMMC-OVA, respectively; 2x106 cells/mouse), 24 hours after the last challenge. RESULTS: BMMC-OVA exhibited an increased percentage of eosinophils, monocytes and hematopoietic precursors, while mesenchymal stem cells decreased, as compared with BMMC-Control. BMMCs from both donor groups reduced airway resistance, alveolar collapse, bronchoconstriction index, eosinophil infiltration, collagen fiber content in alveolar septa and levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-ß, and vascular endothelial growth factor in lung homogenates. However, the benefits of BMMCs were significantly more pronounced when cells were obtained from control donors. CONCLUSION: Both BMMC-Control and BMMC-OVA reduced the inflammatory and remodeling processes; nevertheless, BMMC-Control led to a greater improvement in lung morphofunction, which may be due to different BMMC composition and/or properties.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/scrt496

  3 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834428
[Au] Autor:He X; Feng B; Huang C; Wang H; Ge Y; Hu R; Yin M; Xu Z; Wang W; Fu W; Zheng J
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China....
[Ti] Title:Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering.
[So] Source:Int J Nanomedicine;10:2089-99, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1178-2013
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL) membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes) in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young's modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2147/IJN.S79461

  4 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25550471
[Au] Autor:Tusi BK; Deng C; Salz T; Zeumer L; Li Y; So CW; Morel LM; Qiu Y; Huang S
[Ad] Address:Departments of *Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Pathology, Immunology & Laboratory Medicine, and Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA; Institute of Hematology, Jinan University Medical College, ShiPai, Guangzhou, China; and Departme...
[Ti] Title:Setd1a regulates progenitor B-cell-to-precursor B-cell development through histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation and Ig heavy-chain rearrangement.
[So] Source:FASEB J;29(4):1505-15, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1530-6860
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:SETD1A is a member of trithorax-related histone methyltransferases that methylate lysine 4 at histone H3 (H3K4). We showed previously that Setd1a is required for mesoderm specification and hematopoietic lineage differentiation in vitro. However, it remains unknown whether or not Setd1a controls specific hematopoietic lineage commitment and differentiation during animal development. Here, we reported that homozygous Setd1a knockout (KO) mice are embryonic lethal. Loss of the Setd1a gene in the hematopoietic compartment resulted in a blockage of the progenitor B-cell-to-precursor B-cell development in bone marrow (BM) and B-cell maturation in spleen. The Setd1a-cKO (conditional knockout) mice exhibited an enlarged spleen with disrupted spleen architecture and leukocytopenia. Mechanistically, Setd1a deficiency in BM reduced the levels of H3K4me3 at critical B-cell gene loci, including Pax5 and Rag1/2, which are critical for the IgH (Ig heavy-chain) locus contractions and rearrangement. Subsequently, the differential long-range looped interactions of the enhancer Eµ with proximal 5' DH region and 3' regulatory regions as well as with Pax5-activated intergenic repeat elements and 5' distal VH genes were compromised by the Setd1a-cKO. Together, our findings revealed a critical role of Setd1a and its mediated epigenetic modifications in regulating the IgH rearrangement and B-cell development.-Tusi, B. K., Deng, C., Salz, T., Zeumer, L., Li, Y., So, C. W. E., Morel, L. M., Qiu, Y., Huang, S. Setd1a regulates progenitor B-cell-to-precursor B-cell development through histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation and Ig heavy-chain rearrangement.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1096/fj.14-263061

  5 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25466901
[Au] Autor:Sasi SP; Rahimi L; Yan X; Silver M; Qin G; Losordo DW; Kishore R; Goukassian DA
[Ad] Address:Cardiovascular Research Center, GeneSys Research Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA;...
[Ti] Title:Genetic deletion of TNFR2 augments inflammatory response and blunts satellite-cell-mediated recovery response in a hind limb ischemia model.
[So] Source:FASEB J;29(4):1208-19, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1530-6860
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We have previously shown that TNF-tumor necrosis factor receptor-2/p75 (TNFR2/p75) signaling plays a critical role in ischemia-induced neovascularization in skeletal muscle and heart tissues. To determine the role of TNF-TNFR2/p75 signaling in ischemia-induced inflammation and muscle regeneration, we subjected wild-type (WT) and TNFR2/p75 knockout (p75KO) mice to hind limb ischemia (HLI) surgery. Ischemia induced significant and long-lasting inflammation associated with considerable decrease in satellite-cell activation in p75KO muscle tissue up to 10 d after HLI surgery. To determine the possible additive negative roles of tissue aging and the absence of TNFR2/p75, either in the tissue or in the bone marrow (BM), we generated 2 chimeric BM transplantation (BMT) models where both young green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive p75KO and WT BM-derived cells were transplanted into adult p75KO mice. HLI surgery was performed 1 mo after BMT, after confirming complete engraftment of the recipient BM with GFP donor cells. In adult p75KO with the WT-BMT, proliferative (Ki67(+)) cells were detected only by d 28 and were exclusively GFP(+), suggesting significantly delayed contribution of young WT-BM cell to adult p75KO ischemic tissue recovery. No GFP(+) young p75KO BM cells survived in adult p75KO tissue, signifying the additive negative roles of tissue aging combined with decreased/absent TNFR2/p75 signaling in postischemic recovery.-Sasi, S. P., Rahimi, L., Yan, X., Silver, M., Qin, G., Losordo, D. W., Kishore, R., Goukassian, D. A. Genetic deletion of TNFR2 augments inflammatory response and blunts satellite-cell-mediated recovery response in a hind limb ischemia model.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1096/fj.14-249813

  6 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25834398
[Au] Autor:Abu N; Mohamed NE; Yeap SK; Lim KL; Akhtar MN; Zulfadli AJ; Kee BB; Abdullah MP; Omar AR; Alitheen NB
[Ad] Address:Bright Sparks Unit, Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia ; Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia....
[Ti] Title:In vivo antitumor and antimetastatic effects of flavokawain B in 4T1 breast cancer cell-challenged mice.
[So] Source:Drug Des Devel Ther;9:1401-17, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1177-8881
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Flavokawain B (FKB) is a naturally occurring chalcone that can be isolated through the root extracts of the kava-kava plant (Piper methysticum). It can also be synthesized chemically to increase the yield. This compound is a promising candidate as a biological agent, as it is reported to be involved in a wide range of biological activities. Furthermore, FKB was reported to have antitumorigenic effects in several cancer cell lines in vitro. However, the in vivo antitumor effects of FKB have not been reported on yet. Breast cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related deaths in the world today. Any potential treatment should not only impede the growth of the tumor, but also modulate the immune system efficiently and inhibit the formation of secondary tumors. As presented in our study, FKB induced apoptosis in 4T1 tumors in vivo, as evidenced by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining of the tumor. FKB also regulated the immune system by increasing both helper and cytolytic T-cell and natural killer cell populations. In addition, FKB also enhanced the levels of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma but suppressed interleukin 1B. Apart from that, FKB was also found to inhibit metastasis, as evaluated by clonogenic assay, bone marrow smearing assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and proteome profiler analysis. All in all, FKB may serve as a promising anticancer agent, especially in treating breast cancer.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2147/DDDT.S67976

  7 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25129340
[Au] Autor:DiVasta AD; Mulkern RV; Gordon CM; Ecklund K
[Ad] Address:Boston Children's Hospital, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:MR Imaging in a case of severe anorexia nervosa: the 'flip-flop' effect.
[So] Source:Pediatr Radiol;45(4):617-20, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1998
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report an MR imaging phenomenon that can lead to misinterpretation. The unique appearance of the soft tissues and bone marrow in a 19-year-old severely malnourished woman with anorexia nervosa raised concerns about technical failure or systemic pathology. Due to extreme fat depletion, the T1-weighted images appeared to be fat-suppressed and the fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images appeared to be non-fat-suppressed ("flip-flopped"). Failure to recognize the influence of a patient's overall nutritional status on MR images may cause confusion and misdiagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00247-014-3145-3

  8 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25829988
[Au] Autor:Dhakal LP; Bourgeois K; Barrett KM; Freeman WD
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Jacksonville, FL, USA ; Department of Neurology, Jacksonville, FL, USA....
[Ti] Title:The "starfield" pattern of cerebral fat embolism from bone marrow necrosis in sickle cell crisis.
[So] Source:Neurohospitalist;5(2):74-6, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1941-8744
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sickle cell disease may manifest with cerebrovascular and systemic complications. Sickle crisis that results in avascular necrosis of long bones with resultant cerebral fat embolism syndrome is rare and has a characteristic "starfield" pattern on MRI. This "starfield" MRI pattern should raise suspicion for sickle cell crisis in patients without a known history of the disease, which can lead to earlier sickle cell red blood cell exchange transfusion and treatment. We present a case of a male who presented emergently with acute seizure, coma with a characteristic MRI pattern, which lead to the diagnosis of avascular bone marrow necrosis and cerebral fat embolism syndrome from sickle cell crisis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150401
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1941874414554300

  9 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25621808
[Au] Autor:Hobbs GS; Hamdi A; Hilden PD; Goldberg JD; Poon ML; Ledesma C; Devlin SM; Rondon G; Papadopoulos EB; Jakubowski AA; O'Reilly RJ; Champlin RE; Giralt S; Perales MA; Kebriaei P
[Ad] Address:1] Adult Bone Marrow Transplantation Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA [2] Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA....
[Ti] Title:Comparison of outcomes at two institutions of patients with ALL receiving ex vivo T-cell-depleted or unmodified allografts.
[So] Source:Bone Marrow Transplant;50(4):493-8, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5365
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We compared outcomes of adult patients receiving T-cell-depleted (TCD) hematopoietic SCT (HCT) without additional GVHD prophylaxis at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, N=52), with those of patients receiving conventional grafts at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC, N=115) for ALL in CR1 or CR2. Patients received myeloablative conditioning. Thirty-nine patients received anti-thymocyte globulin at MSKCC and 29 at MDACC. Cumulative incidence of grades 2-4 acute (P=0.001, 17.3% vs 42.6% at 100 days) and chronic GVHD (P=0.006, 13.5% vs 33.4% at 3 years) were significantly lower in the TCD group. The non-relapse mortality at day 100, 1 and 3 years was 15.4, 25.0 and 35.9% in the TCD group and 9.6, 23.6 and 28.6% in the unmodified group (P=0.368). There was no difference in relapse (P=0.107, 21.3% vs 35.5% at 3 years), OS (P=0.854, 42.6% vs 43.0% at 3 years) or RFS (P=0.653, 42.8% vs 35.9% at 3 years). In an adjusted model, age >50, cytogenetics and CR status were associated with inferior RFS (hazard ratio (HR)=2.16, P=0.003, HR=1.77, P=0.022, HR=2.47, P<0.001), whereas graft type was NS (HR=0.90, P=0.635). OS and RFS rates are similar in patients undergoing TCD or conventional HCT, but TCD effectively reduces the rate of GVHD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/bmt.2014.302

  10 / 318787 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25830126
[Au] Autor:Kim YK; Lee SS; Jeong SH; Ahn JS; Yang DH; Lee JJ; Kim HJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Hematology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and safety of eltrombopag in adult refractory immune thrombocytopenia.
[So] Source:Blood Res;50(1):19-25, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2287-979X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Eltrombopag is a thrombopoietin receptor agonist with excellent treatment outcomes in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Here, we analyzed the dose of eltrombopag required to achieve and maintain safe platelet counts in Korean ITP patients. METHODS: Adult refractory ITP patients (<30,000 platelets/µL) were enrolled. Eltrombopag doses were increased to achieve a target platelet count (≥50,000 cells/µL). After achieving the target platelet count, the dose of concomitant ITP medications and eltrombopag was reduced to identify the lowest effective dose required to maintain the platelet count. RESULTS: Among 18 patients, 66.7% achieved complete response, 5.6% achieved platelet counts between 50,000 and 100,000 cells/µL, and 27.8% failed to achieve the target platelet count. The median ITP duration was significantly shorter in patients who achieved the target platelet count. The initial dose required to achieve the target platelet count was 25 mg/d. The adjusted maintenance doses were 25 mg twice per week or 25 mg/d. After discontinuation, 83.3% relapsed, and the median relapse-free survival was 15 days. Two relapsed and 1 failed patient switched to romiplostim. The response to romiplostim was similar to eltrombopag. During eltrombopag treatment, 38.9% showed hepatobiliary laboratory anomalies. Among 9 follow-up bone marrow examinations, 1 revealed fibrosis after 1 year of treatment. CONCLUSION: Eltrombopag was well tolerated with excellent treatment outcomes in refractory adult ITP patients. Low-dose eltrombopag effectively maintained the target platelet count. However, some patients required longer or higher-dose treatment to maintain the target platelet count, especially in heavily pretreated or longer ITP cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150401
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5045/br.2015.50.1.19


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