Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Bone and Marrow [Words]
References found : 308637 [refine]
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[PMID]: 25024623
[Au] Autor:Bai YQ; Yang YX; Yang YG; Ding SZ; Jin FL; Cao MB; Zhang YR; Zhang BY
[Ad] Address:Yang-Qiu Bai, Yu-Xiu Yang, Song-Ze Ding, Ming-Bo Cao, Yan-Rui Zhang, Bing-Yong Zhang, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zhengzhou University People's Hospital, Zhengzhou 450003, Henan Province, China....
[Ti] Title:Outcomes of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation in decompensated liver cirrhosis.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;20(26):8660-6, 2014 Jul 14.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To determine the long-term efficacy of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) transplantation in terms of improving liver function and reducing complications in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. METHODS: A total of 47 inpatients with decompensated liver cirrhosis were enrolled in this trial, including 32 patients undergoing a single BM-MNCs transplantation plus routine medical treatment, and 15 patients receiving medical treatment only as controls. Forty-three of 47 patients were infected with hepatitis B virus. Bone marrow of 80-100 mL was obtained from each patient and the BM-MNCs suspension was transfused into the liver via the hepatic artery. The efficacy of BM-MNCs transplantation was monitored during a 24-mo follow-up period. RESULTS: Liver function parameters in the two groups were observed at 1 mo after BM-MNCs transfusion. Prealbumin level was 118.3 ± 25.3 mg/L vs 101.4 ± 28.7 mg/L (P = 0.047); albumin level was 33.5 ± 3.6 g/L vs 30.3 ± 2.2 g/L (P = 0.002); total bilirubin 36.9 ± 9.7 mmol/L vs 45.6 ± 19.9 mmol/L (P = 0.048); prothrombin time 14.4 ± 2.3 s vs 15.9 ± 2.8 s (P = 0.046); prothrombin activity 84.3% ± 14.3% vs 74.4% ± 17.8% (P = 0.046); fibrinogen 2.28 ± 0.53 g/L vs 1.89 ± 0.44 g/L (P = 0.017); and platelet count 74.5 ± 15.7 × 10(9)/L vs 63.3 ± 15.7 × 10(9)/L (P = 0.027) in the treatment group and control group, respectively. Differences were statistically significant. The efficacy of BM-MNCs transplantation lasted 3-12 mo as compared with the control group. Serious complications such as hepatic encephalopathy and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis were also significantly reduced in BM-MNCs transfused patients compared with the controls. However, these improvements disappeared 24 mo after transplantation. CONCLUSION: BM-MNCs transplantation is safe and effective in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. It also decreases the incidence of serious complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v20.i26.8660

  2 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24918616
[Au] Autor:Mathes DW; Chang J; Hwang B; Graves SS; Storer BE; Butts-Miwongtum T; Sale GE; Storb R
[Ad] Address:1 Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. 2 Department of Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 3 Plastic Surgery Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA. 4 Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 5 School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 6 Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 7 Address correspondence to: David W. Mathes, M.D., Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, PO Box 19024; D1-100 1100 Fairview Ave, N, Seattle, WA 98109.
[Ti] Title:Simultaneous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and a vascularized composite allograft leads to tolerance.
[So] Source:Transplantation;98(2):131-8, 2014 Jul 27.
[Is] ISSN:1534-6080
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that tolerance to a vascularized composite allograft (VCA) can be achieved after the establishment of mixed chimerism. We test the hypothesis that tolerance to a VCA in our dog leukocyte antigen-matched canine model is not dependent on the previous establishment of mixed chimerism and can be induced coincident with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). METHODS: Eight dog leukocyte antigen-matched, minor antigen mismatched dogs received 200 cGy of radiation and a VCA transplant. Four dogs received donor bone marrow at the time of VCA transplantation (group 1), whereas a second group of four dogs did not (group 2). All recipients received a limited course of postgrafting immunosuppression. All dogs that received HCT and VCA were given donor, third-party, and autologous skin grafts. RESULTS: All group 1 recipients were tolerant to their VCA (>62 weeks). Three of the four dogs in group 2 rejected their VCA transplants after the cessation of immunosuppression. Biopsies obtained from the muscle and skin of VCA from group 1 showed few infiltrating cells compared with extensive infiltrates in biopsies of VCA from group 2. Compared with autologous skin and muscle, elevated levels of CD3+ FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells were found in the skin and muscle obtained from the VCA of HCT recipients. All group 1 animals were tolerant to their donor skin graft and promptly rejected the third-party skin grafts. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrated that donor-specific tolerance to all components of the VCA can be established through simultaneous nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT and VCA transplantation protocol.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/TP.0000000000000204

  3 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24408677
[Au] Autor:Kasai H; Miyati T; Kawai T; Kan H; Kawano M; Shibamoto Y
[Ad] Address:Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-0942, Japan, hhkasai@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A method for assessing metabolic information on liver and bone marrow by use of double gradient-echo with spectral fat suppression.
[So] Source:Radiol Phys Technol;7(2):211-6, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1865-0341
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Our aim in this study was to create a noninvasive and practical method for evaluating metabolic information on the liver (iron content and lipid infiltration) and spine (bone mineral density and marrow fat degeneration) using double gradient-echo with and without the spectral fat suppression technique (double-GRE-FS). We arranged phantoms made of various concentrations of superparamagnetic iron oxide solution adjacent to neutral fat to obtain slice planes with various fat fractions using the partial volume effect. We obtained double-GRE-FS images and calculated the T2* values. The fat fraction was calculated from signal intensities of double-GRE-FS images after T2* decay, baseline, and slope corrections. We assessed the fat fraction and the relationship between R2* of the water component and the iron concentration. In addition, we evaluated those values in human bone marrow and liver, including a patient with liver steatosis. The actual fat fraction value was consistent with the fat fraction obtained with the double-GRE-FS method, and the calculated fat fraction was unaffected by the iron concentration. There was a strong positive correlation between R2* of the water component and the iron concentration. There was a negative correlation between the fat fraction and the bone mineral density, and the R2* was correlated with the bone mineral density. The calculated fat fraction in the liver steatosis patient was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers. The double-GRE-FS makes it possible to assess the fat fraction and R2* simultaneously, and to obtain metabolic information on the liver and bone marrow.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12194-013-0254-x

  4 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019438
[Au] Autor:Murphey MD; Foreman KL; Klassen-Fischer MK; Fox MG; Chung EM; Kransdorf MJ
[Ad] Address:From the Departments of Musculoskeletal Imaging (M.D.M., K.L.F., E.M.C.) and Pediatric Imaging (E.M.C.), American Institute for Radiologic Pathology, 1010 Wayne Ave, Suite 320, Silver Spring, MD 20910; Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Md (M.D.M., E.M.C.); Department of Radiology, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Md (M.D.M., K.L.F., E.M.C.); Joint Pathology Center, Silver Spring, Md (M.K.K.F.); Department of Radiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va (M.G.F.); and Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz (M.J.K.).
[Ti] Title:From the radiologic pathology archives imaging of osteonecrosis: radiologic-pathologic correlation.
[So] Source:Radiographics;34(4):1003-28, 2014 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1527-1323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Osteonecrosis is common and represents loss of blood supply to a region of bone. Common sites affected include the femoral head, humeral head, knee, femoral/tibial metadiaphysis, scaphoid, lunate, and talus. Symptomatic femoral head osteonecrosis accounts for 10,000-20,000 new cases annually in the United States. In contradistinction, metadiaphyseal osteonecrosis is often occult and asymptomatic. There are numerous causes of osteonecrosis most commonly related to trauma, corticosteroids, and idiopathic. Imaging of osteonecrosis is frequently diagnostic with a serpentine rim of sclerosis on radiographs, photopenia in early disease at bone scintigraphy, and maintained yellow marrow at MR imaging with a serpentine rim of high signal intensity (double-line sign) on images obtained with long repetition time sequences. These radiologic features correspond to the underlying pathology of osseous response to wall off the osteonecrotic process and attempts at repair with vascularized granulation tissue at the reactive interface. The long-term clinical importance of epiphyseal osteonecrosis is almost exclusively based on the likelihood of overlying articular collapse. MR imaging is generally considered the most sensitive and specific imaging modality both for early diagnosis and identifying features that increase the possibility of this complication. Treatment subsequent to articular collapse and development of secondary osteoarthritis typically requires reconstructive surgery. Malignant transformation of osteonecrosis is rare and almost exclusively associated with metadiaphyseal lesions. Imaging features of this dire sequela include aggressive bone destruction about the lesion margin, cortical involvement, and an associated soft-tissue mass. Recognizing the appearance of osteonecrosis, which reflects the underlying pathology, improves radiologic assessment and is important to guide optimal patient management. ©RSNA, 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1148/rg.344140019

  5 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019436
[Au] Autor:Nguyen JC; De Smet AA; Graf BK; Rosas HG
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Radiology and Orthopedics, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, 600 Highland Ave, E3/311, Madison, WI 53792.
[Ti] Title:MR Imaging-based Diagnosis and Classification of Meniscal Tears.
[So] Source:Radiographics;34(4):981-99, 2014 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1527-1323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is currently the modality of choice for detecting meniscal injuries and planning subsequent treatment. A thorough understanding of the imaging protocols, normal meniscal anatomy, surrounding anatomic structures, and anatomic variants and pitfalls is critical to ensure diagnostic accuracy and prevent unnecessary surgery. High-spatial-resolution imaging of the meniscus can be performed using fast spin-echo and three-dimensional MR imaging sequences. Normal anatomic structures that can mimic a tear include the meniscal ligament, meniscofemoral ligaments, popliteomeniscal fascicles, and meniscomeniscal ligament. Anatomic variants and pitfalls that can mimic a tear include discoid meniscus, meniscal flounce, a meniscal ossicle, and chondrocalcinosis. When a meniscal tear is identified, accurate description and classification of the tear pattern can guide the referring clinician in patient education and surgical planning. For example, longitudinal tears are often amenable to repair, whereas horizontal and radial tears may require partial meniscectomy. Tear patterns include horizontal, longitudinal, radial, root, complex, displaced, and bucket-handle tears. Occasionally, meniscal tears can be difficult to detect at imaging; however, secondary indirect signs, such as a parameniscal cyst, meniscal extrusion, or linear subchondral bone marrow edema, should increase the radiologist's suspicion for an underlying tear. Awareness of common diagnostic errors can ensure accurate diagnosis of meniscal tears. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1148/rg.344125202

  6 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25020062
[Au] Autor:Papadimitropoulos A; Piccinini E; Brachat S; Braccini A; Wendt D; Barbero A; Jacobi C; Martin I
[Ad] Address:Departments of Surgery and of Biomedicine, Institute for Surgical Research and Hospital Management, University Hospital Basel, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland....
[Ti] Title:Expansion of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Fresh Bone Marrow in a 3D Scaffold-Based System under Direct Perfusion.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(7):e102359, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) expansion in conventional monolayer culture on plastic dishes (2D) leads to progressive loss of functionality and thus challenges fundamental studies on the physiology of skeletal progenitors, as well as translational applications for cellular therapy and molecular medicine. Here we demonstrate that 2D MSC expansion can be entirely bypassed by culturing freshly isolated bone marrow nucleated cells within 3D porous scaffolds in a perfusion-based bioreactor system. The 3D-perfusion system generated a stromal tissue that could be enzymatically treated to yield CD45- MSC. As compared to 2D-expanded MSC (control), those derived from 3D-perfusion culture after the same time (3 weeks) or a similar extent of proliferation (7-8 doublings) better maintained their progenitor properties, as assessed by a 4.3-fold higher clonogenicity and the superior differentiation capacity towards all typical mesenchymal lineages. Transcriptomic analysis of MSC from 5 donors validated the robustness of the process and indicated a reduced inter-donor variability and a significant upregulation of multipotency-related gene clusters following 3D-perfusion- as compared to 2D-expansion. Interestingly, the differences in functionality and transcriptomics between MSC expanded in 2D or under 3D-perfusion were only partially captured by cytofluorimetric analysis using conventional surface markers. The described system offers a multidisciplinary approach to study how factors of a 3D engineered niche regulate MSC function and, by streamlining conventional labor-intensive processes, is prone to automation and scalability within closed bioreactor systems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0102359

  7 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019290
[Au] Autor:Pavese JM; Ogden IM; Voll EA; Huang X; Xu L; Jovanovic B; Bergan RC
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America....
[Ti] Title:Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP2K4) Promotes Human Prostate Cancer Metastasis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(7):e102289, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the US. Death from PCa primarily results from metastasis. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) is overexpressed in invasive PCa lesions in humans, and can be inhibited by small molecule therapeutics that demonstrate favorable activity in phase II studies. However, MAP2K4's role in regulating metastatic behavior is controversial and unknown. To investigate, we engineered human PCa cell lines which overexpress either wild type or constitutive active MAP2K4. Orthotopic implantation into mice demonstrated MAP2K4 increases formation of distant metastasis. Constitutive active MAP2K4, though not wild type, increases tumor size and circulating tumor cells in the blood and bone marrow. Complementary in vitro studies establish stable MAP2K4 overexpression promotes cell invasion, but does not affect cell growth or migration. MAP2K4 overexpression increases the expression of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) protein and protease production, with the largest effect upon matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), both in vitro and in mouse tumor samples. Further, MAP2K4-mediated increases in cell invasion are dependent upon heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) and MMP-2, but not upon MAP2K4's immediate downstream targets, p38 MAPK or JNK. We demonstrate that MAP2K4 increases human PCa metastasis, and prolonged over expression induces long term changes in cell signaling pathways leading to independence from p38 MAPK and JNK. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for human studies linking increases in HSP27 and MMP-2 to progression to metastatic disease. MAP2K4 is validated as an important therapeutic target for inhibiting human PCa metastasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0102289

  8 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019218
[Au] Autor:Fimognari C; Turrini E; Sestili P; Calcabrini C; Carulli G; Fontanelli G; Rousseau M; Cantelli-Forti G; Hrelia P
[Ad] Address:Department for Life Quality Studies, Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, Rimini, Italy....
[Ti] Title:Antileukemic activity of sulforaphane in primary blasts from patients affected by myelo- and lympho-proliferative disorders and in hypoxic conditions.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(7):e101991, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sulforaphane is a dietary isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables showing antileukemic activity. With the purpose of extending the potential clinical impact of sulforaphane in the oncological field, we investigated the antileukemic effect of sulforaphane on blasts from patients affected by different types of leukemia and, taking into account the intrinsically hypoxic nature of bone marrow, on a leukemia cell line (REH) maintained in hypoxic conditions. In particular, we tested sulforaphane on patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and blastic NK cell leukemia. Sulforaphane caused a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in blasts from patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic or myeloid leukemia. Moreover, it was able to cause apoptosis and to inhibit proliferation in hypoxic conditions on REH cells. As to its cytotoxic mechanism, we found that sulforaphane creates an oxidative cellular environment that induces DNA damage and Bax and p53 gene activation, which in turn helps trigger apoptosis. On the whole, our results raise hopes that sulforaphane might set the stage for a novel therapeutic principle complementing our growing armature against malignancies and advocate the exploration of sulforaphane in a broader population of leukemic patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0101991

  9 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019555
[Au] Autor:Croset M; Santini D; Iuliani M; Fioramonti M; Zoccoli A; Vincenzi B; Tonini G; Pantano F
[Ad] Address:Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM), UMR 1033, Lyon F-69008, France. martine.croset@inserm.fr....
[Ti] Title:MicroRNAs and Bone Metastasis: A New Challenge.
[So] Source:Molecules;19(6):10115-28, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1420-3049
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The development of bone metastases requires multistep and multicellular machinery consisting not only of processes shared with any type of metastases (formation of a pre-metastatic niche, chemotaxis of tumor cells into the host tissue, tumor cells escape from the microvasculature), but also biological interactions that are strictly related to the particular bone microenvironment (bone marrow colonization by cancer cells, osteomimicry, deregulation of bone homeostasis). MiRNAs are highly conserved, small RNAs molecules that regulate gene expression. The functional consequence of miRNA deregulation lies in the mRNA targets whose expression is altered. MiRNA networks acting as upstream regulators of these genes interfere with the initial steps of tumor local invasion and cancer cell intravasation, mainly by regulating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, the motility, invasiveness and survival abilities of these cells. The miRNA-mediated regulation on the steps of bone tropism, anchorage, homing and finally bone colonization is more tissue specific, being dependent on the expression pattern of target miRNAs in bone marrow sinusoids, bone cells and microenvironment. In that, miRNA specific expression signatures that can distinguish between primary tumors from their corresponding bone metastases might be determinants of clinical aggressiveness. In this review, we focus on the current advances on functions and molecular mechanisms by which miRNAs exert their biological roles in regulating bone metastases development.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3390/molecules190710115

  10 / 308637 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25020058
[Au] Autor:Brincat SD; Borg M; Camilleri G; Calleja-Agius J
[Ad] Address:Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Malta, Malta - jean.calleja-agius@um.edu.mt.
[Ti] Title:The role of cytokines in postmenopausal osteoporosis.
[So] Source:Minerva Ginecol;66(4):391-407, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1827-1650
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a silent systemic progressive disease characterised by a decrease in bone mass per unit volume. This condition compromises the physical strength of the skeleton and increases the susceptibility to fractures on minor trauma. The imbalance between bone formation and bone resorption is known to be responsible for postmenopausal bone loss. Estrogen deficiency contributes to bone loss by increasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by bone marrow and bone cells. Clinical and molecular evidence indicates that estrogen-regulated cytokines exert regulatory effects on bone turnover implicating their role as being the primary mediators of the accelerated bone loss at menopause. The current perspective on the role and interaction of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, TNF, IFN-γ and TGF-ß in bone loss linked with estrogen deficiency is reviewed. Current treatment options and emerging drug therapies in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis are also evaluated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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