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[PMID]: 29485992
[Au] Autor:Finley NL
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Revealing how an adenylate cyclase toxin uses bait and switch tactics in its activation.
[So] Source:PLoS Biol;16(2):e2005356, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1545-7885
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dissecting how bacterial pathogens escape immune destruction and cause respiratory infections in humans is a work in progress. One tactic employed by microbes is to use bacterial adenylate cyclase toxins (ACTs) to disarm immune cells and disrupt cellular signaling in host cells, which facilitates the infection process. Several clinically significant pathogens, such as Bacillus anthracis and Bordetella pertussis, have ACTs that are stimulated by an activator protein in human cells. Research has shown that these bacterial ACTs have evolved distinct ways of controlling their activities, but our understanding of how the B. pertussis ACT does this is limited. In a recent study, O'Brien and colleagues provide new and exciting evidence demonstrating that the regulation of B. pertussis ACT involves conformational switching between flexible and rigid states, which is triggered upon binding the host activator protein. This study increases our knowledge of how bacterial ACTs are unique enzymes, representing a potentially novel class of drug targets that may open new pathways to combat reemerging infectious diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.2005356

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[PMID]: 28457673
[Au] Autor:Lu PJ; O'Halloran A; Kennedy ED; Williams WW; Kim D; Fiebelkorn AP; Donahue S; Bridges CB
[Ad] Address:Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. Electronic address: lhp8@cdc.gov.
[Ti] Title:Awareness among adults of vaccine-preventable diseases and recommended vaccinations, United States, 2015.
[So] Source:Vaccine;35(23):3104-3115, 2017 05 25.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Adults are recommended to receive select vaccinations based on their age, underlying medical conditions, lifestyle, and other considerations. Factors associated with awareness of vaccine-preventable diseases and recommended vaccines among adults in the United States have not been explored. METHODS: Data from a 2015 internet panel survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults aged ≥19years were analyzed to assess awareness of selected vaccine-preventable diseases and recommended vaccines for adults. A multivariable logistic regression model with a predictive marginal approach was used to identify factors independently associated with awareness of selected vaccine-preventable infections/diseases and corresponding vaccines. RESULTS: Among the surveyed population, from 24.6 to 72.1% reported vaccination for recommended vaccines. Awareness of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults aged ≥19years ranged from 63.4% to 94.0% (63.4% reported awareness of HPV, 71.5% reported awareness of tetanus, 72.0% reported awareness of pertussis, 75.4% reported awareness of HZ, 75.8% reported awareness of hepatitis B, 83.1% reported awareness of pneumonia, and 94.0% reported awareness of influenza). Awareness of the corresponding vaccines among adults aged ≥19years ranged from 59.3% to 94.1% (59.3% HZ vaccine, 59.6% HPV vaccine, 64.3% hepatitis B vaccine, 66.2% pneumococcal vaccine, 86.3% tetanus vaccines, and 94.1% influenza vaccine). In multivariable analysis, being female and being a college graduate were significantly associated with a higher level of awareness for majority of vaccine-preventable diseases, and being female, being a college graduate, and working as a health care provider were significantly associated with a higher level of awareness for majority of corresponding vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: Although adults in this survey reported high levels of awareness for most vaccines recommended for adults, self-reported vaccination coverage was not optimal. Combining interventions known to increase uptake of recommended vaccines, such as patient reminder/recall systems and other healthcare system-based interventions, and ensuring patients' vaccination needs are assessed, are needed to improve vaccination of adults.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Immunization Programs
Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Educational Status
Female
Hepatitis B/prevention & control
Hepatitis B Vaccines/administration & dosage
Humans
Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage
Pneumococcal Vaccines/administration & dosage
Sex Factors
Tetanus/prevention & control
United States
Vaccination/psychology
Whooping Cough/prevention & control
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Hepatitis B Vaccines); 0 (Influenza Vaccines); 0 (Papillomavirus Vaccines); 0 (Pneumococcal Vaccines)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28456527
[Au] Autor:Perry J; Towers CV; Weitz B; Wolfe L
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN, United States.
[Ti] Title:Patient reaction to Tdap vaccination in pregnancy.
[So] Source:Vaccine;35(23):3064-3066, 2017 05 25.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The current obstetrical recommendation is to routinely administer the tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination during every pregnancy regardless of a patient's prior history. There are minimal data that have prospectively evaluated solicited patient response to this treatment plan. The study objective was to evaluate patient reaction following receipt of Tdap vaccination during pregnancy. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study conducted from May 2014 through March 2016. The study design involved solicited patient reaction within 1-7days after the administration of the Tdap vaccine. Data collected included pain or soreness, swelling, and/or redness at the injection site, as well as, fever and generalized body aches. Statistical analysis involved simple percentages with Poisson binomial 95% confidence intervals with Chi-square and Fisher's exact comparisons where appropriate. RESULTS: A total of 737 patients were evaluated and 496 (67%, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 64-71%) were found to have at least 1 reaction to the vaccination and 187 (25%, 95% CI 22-29%) had 2 reactions or more. Overall, the majority of patients stated that the vaccination was tolerated. However, 24 (3%, 95% CI 2-5%) of the study population stated that they would not accept receipt of Tdap in a subsequent pregnancy because of the response that occurred in the current pregnancy. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that maternal reactions following receipt of Tdap are common (two-thirds of the study population). A potential concern is the finding that some patients might refuse a repeat vaccination in a subsequent pregnancy due to these reactions. If further research reveals similar findings, a pertussis only vaccine for pregnant patients might need to be evaluated.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines/administration & dosage
Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines/adverse effects
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Diphtheria/prevention & control
Female
Fever/etiology
Humans
Mothers/psychology
Myalgia/etiology
Pain/etiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Tetanus/prevention & control
Vaccination
Whooping Cough/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 2938 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28449972
[Au] Autor:Sil A; Ravi MD; Patnaik BN; Dhingra MS; Dupuy M; Gandhi DJ; Dhaded SM; Dubey AP; Kundu R; Lalwani SK; Chhatwal J; Mathew LG; Gupta M; Sharma SD; Bavdekar SB; Rout SP; Jayanth MV; D'Cor NA; Mangarule SA; Ravinuthala S; Reddy E J
[Ad] Address:Shantha Biotechnics Private Limited - A Sanofi Company, Hyderabad, India. Electronic address: arijit.sil@sanofi.com.
[Ti] Title:Effect of prophylactic or therapeutic administration of paracetamol on immune response to DTwP-HepB-Hib combination vaccine in Indian infants.
[So] Source:Vaccine;35(22):2999-3006, 2017 05 19.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vaccination is considered as the most cost effective method for preventing infectious diseases. Low grade fever is a known adverse effect of vaccination. In India, it is a common clinical practice to prescribe paracetamol either prophylactically or therapeutically to manage fever. Some studies have shown that paracetamol interferes with antibody responses following immunization. This manuscript reports the outcome of a post hoc analysis of data from a clinical trial of a pentavalent vaccine in Indian infants where paracetamol was not used or was used either as prophylaxis or for treatment of fever. METHODS: Pre and post vaccine antibody levels against Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type B were assessed in no paracetamol and paracetamol groups. The paracetamol group was further divided into prophylactic and treatment groups. RESULTS: Similar rates of seroprotection/seroresponse for anti-D, anti-T, anti-wP, anti-PT, anti-HBs and anti-PRP were observed in all the groups. There was no clear tendency for difference in percentage seroprotection/seroresponse and geometric mean (GM) titers in any of the groups. CONCLUSION: The study found no evidence that paracetamol usage either as prophylactic or for treatment impact immunological responses to DTwP-HepB-Hib combination vaccine. [Clinical trial registry of India (study registration number CTRI/2012/08/002872)].
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acetaminophen/therapeutic use
Antibodies, Bacterial/blood
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine/administration & dosage
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine/immunology
Haemophilus Vaccines/administration & dosage
Haemophilus Vaccines/immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines/administration & dosage
Hepatitis B Vaccines/immunology
Immunity, Humoral/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acetaminophen/administration & dosage
Acetaminophen/adverse effects
Diphtheria/immunology
Diphtheria/prevention & control
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine/adverse effects
Female
Fever/drug therapy
Fever/etiology
Fever/prevention & control
Haemophilus Infections/ethnology
Haemophilus Infections/immunology
Haemophilus Infections/prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines/adverse effects
Hepatitis B/immunology
Hepatitis B/prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies/blood
Hepatitis B Vaccines/adverse effects
Humans
India
Infant
Male
Tetanus/immunology
Tetanus/prevention & control
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate/immunology
Whooping Cough/immunology
Whooping Cough/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Bacterial); 0 (Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine); 0 (DtwP-HepB-Hib vaccine); 0 (Haemophilus Vaccines); 0 (Hepatitis B Antibodies); 0 (Hepatitis B Vaccines); 0 (Vaccines, Conjugate); 362O9ITL9D (Acetaminophen)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29203545
[Au] Autor:Hasan S; Kulkarni NN; Asbjarnarson A; Linhartova I; Osicka R; Sebo P; Gudmundsson GH
[Ad] Address:Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, v.v.i., Prague, Czech Republic.
[Ti] Title:Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Disrupts Functional Integrity of Bronchial Epithelial Layers.
[So] Source:Infect Immun;86(3), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5522
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The airway epithelium restricts the penetration of inhaled pathogens into the underlying tissue and plays a crucial role in the innate immune defense against respiratory infections. The whooping cough agent, , adheres to ciliated cells of the human airway epithelium and subverts its defense functions through the action of secreted toxins and other virulence factors. We examined the impact of infection and of adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) action on the functional integrity of human bronchial epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). adhesion to the apical surface of polarized pseudostratified VA10 cell layers provoked a disruption of tight junctions and caused a drop in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). The reduction of TEER depended on the capacity of the secreted CyaA toxin to elicit cAMP signaling in epithelial cells through its adenylyl cyclase enzyme activity. Both purified CyaA and cAMP-signaling drugs triggered a decrease in the TEER of VA10 cell layers. Toxin-produced cAMP signaling caused actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and induced mucin 5AC production and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion, while it inhibited the IL-17A-induced secretion of the IL-8 chemokine and of the antimicrobial peptide beta-defensin 2. These results indicate that CyaA toxin activity compromises the barrier and innate immune functions of infected airway epithelia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 2938 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29454132
[Au] Autor:Thiriard A; Raze D; Locht C
[Ad] Address:Université de Lille, CNRS UMR 8204, Inserm U1019, CHU Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Centre for Infection and Immunity of Lille, F-59000 Lille, France.
[Ti] Title:Diversion of complement-mediated killing by Bordetella.
[So] Source:Microbes Infect;, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1769-714X
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The complement cascade participates in protection against bacterial infections, and pathogens, including Bordetella pertussis, have developed complement-evading strategies. Here we discuss current knowledge on B. pertussis complement evasion strategies and the role of antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing in protection against B. pertussis infection pointing out important knowledge gaps for further research to improve current pertussis vaccines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 2938 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29428092
[Au] Autor:Canonne AM; Peters I; Roels E; Desquilbet L; Clercx C
[Ad] Address:Internal Medicine Unit, National Veterinary School of Alfort, 94 700 Maisons-Alfort, France. Electronic address: morgane.canonne-guibert@vet-alfort.fr.
[Ti] Title:Detection of specific bacterial agents by quantitative PCR assays in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of dogs with eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy vs. dogs with chronic bronchitis and healthy dogs.
[So] Source:Vet J;232:52-56, 2018 02.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2971
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In humans, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Bordetella pertussis infections are suggested to trigger or exacerbate asthma. Whether Mycoplasma or Bordetella are associated with chronic inflammatory bronchial diseases in dogs has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to assess detection rates of Mycoplasma canis (M. canis), M. cynos and Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb), in dogs with eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy (EBP) and chronic bronchitis (CB), compared with healthy dogs. Specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis for M. canis, M. cynos and Bb were retrospectively performed on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) collected from 24 dogs with EBP, 21 dogs with CB and 15 healthy dogs. Possible associations between qPCR results and age, BALF cytology or clinical severity scores (CSS) in dogs with EBP were investigated. There was no difference in M. canis, M. cynos and Bb detection rates in dogs with EBP (n=6, n=2 and n=6, respectively) and dogs with CB (n=2, n=2 and n=2, respectively) compared with control dogs (n=4, n=2 and n=2, respectively). In dogs with EBP, the proportion that were qPCR-positive for Bb was higher in dogs with higher CSS (P=0.014) and BALF from Bb-positive dogs had higher percentage of neutrophils (P<0.001). Among dogs that were qPCR-positive for Bb, moderate to high loads were only detected in dogs with EBP. M. canis and M. cynos detection was not associated with EBP or CB; higher Bb loads were only present in dogs with EBP and high CSS. A possible cause and effect relationship between Bb infection or load and EBP remains unclear and requires further investigation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 2938 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29455870
[Au] Autor:Fong W; Timms V; Holmes N; Sintchenko V
[Ad] Address:Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology - Public Health, Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research - NSW Health Pathology, Westmead Hospital, NSW, Australia; Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Detection and incidence of Bordetella holmesii in respiratory specimens from patients with pertussis-like symptoms in New South Wales, Australia.
[So] Source:Pathology;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1465-3931
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bordetella pertussis, the aetiological agent of whooping cough is routinely diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) directed at IS481, an insertion sequence target also found in Bordetella holmesii. Recent reports have suggested that B. holmesii infections can be misdiagnosed as pertussis, which can have a significant impact on public health surveillance. This study investigated the presence of B. holmesii in B. pertussis positive clinical samples, in order to determine the incidence of B. holmesii. Clinical cases of pertussis diagnosed by IS481-specific PCR between October 2008 and March 2016 in New South Wales were included. Bordetella holmesii was detected through the simultaneous amplification of IS481 and B. holmesii specific insertions sequence, hIS1001. A total of 46 of 802 patients were identified to be positive for B. holmesii rather than B. pertussis, suggesting an incidence rate of 6.5% in 2009, 16.8% in 2010, 7.6% during 2013 and 8.1% during 2015. Bordetella holmesii infections were diagnosed during and between pertussis epidemics, however cases of B. holmesii and B. pertussis co-infections were not found. The predominant age group of B. holmesii infection was 11-18 years old, which was significantly different to the mean age of B. pertussis infections (0-6 years, p = 0.023). These findings revealed that B. holmesii was co-circulating alongside the B. pertussis epidemic for seven years, hidden from view, as B. holmesii infections have been diagnosed as B. pertussis. Confirmatory testing of B. pertussis positive samples for the presence of B. holmesii, especially during pertussis epidemics, should improve the quality of laboratory diagnosis and laboratory surveillance for pertussis. The presence of B. holmesii in Australia highlights the importance of testing for this pathogen and ongoing molecular surveillance that can guide the control of whooping cough.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 2938 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29180369
[Au] Autor:Bottero D; Zurita ME; Gaillard ME; Bartel E; Vercellini C; Hozbor D
[Ad] Address:Laboratorio VacSal, Instituto de Biotecnología y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CCT-CONICET La Plata, La Plata, Argentina.
[Ti] Title:Membrane Vesicles Derived from Bordetella bronchiseptica: Active Constituent of a New Vaccine against Infections Caused by This Pathogen.
[So] Source:Appl Environ Microbiol;84(4), 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5336
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:, a Gram-negative bacterium, causes chronic respiratory tract infections in a wide variety of mammalian hosts, including humans (albeit rarely). We recently designed and experimental vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from each pathogen, and we obtained protection against the respective infections in mice. Here, we demonstrated that OMVs derived from virulent-phase (OMVBbvir ) protected mice against sublethal infections with different strains, two isolated from farm animals and one isolated from a human patient. In all infections, we observed that the loads were significantly reduced in the lungs of vaccinated animals; the lung-recovered CFU were decreased by ≥4 log units, compared with those detected in the lungs of nonimmunized animals ( < 0.001). In the OMVBbvir -immunized mice, we detected IgG antibody titers against whole-cell lysates, along with an immune serum having bacterial killing activity that both recognized lipopolysaccharides and polypeptides such as GroEL and outer membrane protein C (OMPc) and demonstrated an essential protective capacity against infection, as detected by passive transfer experiments. Stimulation of cultured splenocytes from immunized mice with OMVBbvir resulted in interleukin 5 (IL-5), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-17 production, indicating that the vesicles induced mixed Th2, Th1, and Th17 T-cell immune responses. We detected, by adoptive transfer assays, that spleen cells from OMVBbvir -immunized mice also contributed to the observed protection against infection. OMVs from avirulent-phase and the resulting induced immune sera were also able to protect mice against infection. , a Gram-negative bacterium, causes chronic respiratory tract infections in a wide variety of mammalian hosts, including humans (albeit rarely). Several vaccines aimed at preventing infection have been developed and used, but a safe effective vaccine is still needed. The significance and relevance of our research lie in the characterization of the OMVs derived from as the source of a new experimental vaccine. We demonstrated here that our formulation based on OMVs derived from virulent-phase (OMVBbvir ) was effective against infections caused by isolates obtained from different hosts (farm animals and a human patient). and characterization of humoral and cellular immune responses induced by the OMVBbvir vaccine enabled a better understanding of the mechanism of protection necessary to control infection. Here we also demonstrated that OMVs derived from in the avirulent phase and the corresponding induced humoral immune response were able to protect mice from infection. This realization provides the basis for the development of novel vaccines not only against the acute stages of the disease but also against stages of the disease or the infectious cycle in which avirulence factors could play a role.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 2938 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29237995
[Au] Autor:Loong SK; Che-Mat-Seri NA; Abdulrazak O; Douadi B; Ahmad-Nasrah SN; Johari J; Mohd-Zain SN; Abubakar S
[Ad] Address:Tropical Infectious Diseases Research & Education Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Recovery of Bordetella bronchiseptica sequence type 82 and B. pseudohinzii from urban rats in Terengganu, Malaysia.
[So] Source:J Vet Med Sci;80(1):77-84, 2018 Jan 27.
[Is] ISSN:1347-7439
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rodents have historically been associated with zoonotic pandemics that claimed the lives of large human populations. Appropriate pathogen surveillance initiatives could contribute to early detection of zoonotic infections to prevent future outbreaks. Bordetella species are bacteria known to cause mild to severe respiratory disease in mammals and, some have been described to infect, colonize and spread in rodents. There is a lack of information on the population diversity of bordetellae among Malaysian wild rodents. Here, bordetellae recovered from lung tissues of wild rats were genotypically characterized using 16S rDNA sequencing, MLST and nrdA typing. A novel B. bronchiseptica ST82, closely related to other human-derived isolates, was discovered in three wild rats (n=3) from Terengganu (5.3333° N, 103.1500° E). B. pseudohinzii, a recently identified laboratory mice inhabitant, was also recovered from one rat (n=1). Both bordetellae displayed identical antimicrobial resistance profiles, indicating the close phylogenetic association between them. Genotyping using the 765-bp nrdA locus was shown to be compatible with the MLST-based phylogeny, with the added advantage of being able to genotype non-classical bordetellae. The recovery of B. pseudohinzii from wild rat implied that this bordetellae has a wider host range than previously thought. The findings from this study suggest that bordetellae surveillance among wild rats in Malaysia has to be continued and expanded to other states to ensure early identification of species capable of causing public health disorder.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1292/jvms.17-0218


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