Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Borrelia and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29501703
[Au] Autor:Morand A; Angelakis E; Ben Chaabane M; Parola P; Raoult D; Gautret P
[Ad] Address:Aix Marseille Univ, IRD, AP-HM, MEPHI, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France; Department of Pediatrics, Timone Hospital, AP-HM, Marseille, France.
[Ti] Title:Seek and Find! PCR analyses of skin infections in West-European travelers returning from abroad with an eschar.
[So] Source:Travel Med Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-0442
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Skin infections are among the leading causes of diseases in travelers. Diagnosing pathogens could be difficult. METHOD: We applied molecular assays for the diagnostic of a large collection of skin biopsies and swabs from travelers with suspected skin infections. All samples were tested by qPCR for Coxiella burnetti, Bartonella sp., Rickettsia sp., Borrelia sp., Ehrlichia sp., Tropheryma whipplei, Francisella tularensis, Mycobacteria sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Leishmania spp., Ortho poxvirus and Para poxvirus and then screened for the presence of bacteria by PCR amplification and sequencing, targeting the 16S rRNA gene. RESULTS: From January 2009 to January 2017, 100 international travelers presenting with a suspected skin infection were enrolled. We detected 51 patients with an identified pathogen on skin samples. Travelers presenting with eschars were more likely to have a positive PCR sample (n = 44/76, 57.9%) compared to other patients (n = 7/24, 29.2%). Spotted fever group Rickettsia (n = 28) was the most frequently detected pathogens (19 R. africae, 6 R. conorii, 3 R. mongolitimonae); S. aureus were detected in 11 patients; S. pyogenes in 3; Leishmania sp.; M. leprae and B. henselae in 1 patient, respectively. CONCLUSION: By targeting the most commonly encountered causative agents of travel-related skin infections, our strategy provides a sensitive and rapid diagnostic method.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29032534
[Au] Autor:Caimano MJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, UConn Health, 263 Farmington Ave., Farmington, CT, 06030-3715, USA. mcaima@uchc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Generation of Mammalian Host-Adapted Borrelia burgdorferi by Cultivation in Peritoneal Dialysis Membrane Chamber Implantation in Rats.
[So] Source:Methods Mol Biol;1690:35-45, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1940-6029
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The transmission, survival, and virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi depend upon the spirochete's ability to modulate its transcriptome as it cycles between its arthropod vector and reservoir host. This complex adaptive process is collectively referred to as "host-adaptation." The paucibacillary nature of borrelial infections precludes the detailed analysis of host adaptation within infected mammalian tissues. To circumvent this limitation, we (J Clin Invest 101:2240-2250, 1998) developed a model system whereby spirochetes are cultivated within dialysis membrane chambers (DMCs) surgically implanted within the peritoneal cavity of a rat. Spirochetes within DMCs are exposed to many, if not all, of the environmental signals and physiological cues required for mammalian host adaptation but are protected from clearance by the host's immune system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/978-1-4939-7383-5_3

  3 / 10740 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29511161
[Au] Autor:Carreras-González A; Navasa N; Martín-Ruiz I; Lavín JL; Azkargorta M; Atondo E; Barriales D; Macías-Cámara N; Pascual-Itoiz MA; Sampedro L; Tomás-Cortázar J; Peña-Cearra A; Pellón A; Prados-Rosales R; Abecia L; Elortza F; Aransay AM; Rodríguez H; Anguita J
[Ad] Address:Macrophage and Tick Vaccine Laboratory, CIC bioGUNE, 48160, Derio, Bizkaia, Spain.
[Ti] Title:A multi-omic analysis reveals the regulatory role of CD180 during the response of macrophages to Borrelia burgdorferi.
[So] Source:Emerg Microbes Infect;7(1):19, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2222-1751
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Macrophages are cells of the innate immune system with the ability to phagocytose and induce a global pattern of responses that depend on several signaling pathways. We have determined the biosignature of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and human blood monocytes using transcriptomic and proteomic approaches. We identified a common pattern of genes that are transcriptionally regulated and overall indicate that the response to B. burgdorferi involves the interaction of spirochetal antigens with several inflammatory pathways corresponding to primary (triggered by pattern-recognition receptors) and secondary (induced by proinflammatory cytokines) responses. We also show that the Toll-like receptor family member CD180 is downregulated by the stimulation of macrophages, but not monocytes, with the spirochete. Silencing Cd180 results in increased phagocytosis while tempering the production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF. Cd180-silenced cells produce increased levels of Itgam and surface CD11b, suggesting that the regulation of CD180 by the spirochete initiates a cascade that increases CR3-mediated phagocytosis of the bacterium while repressing the consequent inflammatory response.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41426-017-0018-5

  4 / 10740 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28457619
[Au] Autor:D'Arco C; Dattwyler RJ; Arnaboldi PM
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595, United States.
[Ti] Title:Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgA in Lyme Disease.
[So] Source:EBioMedicine;19:91-97, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:2352-3964
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease is currently dependent on the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of the disease. The significance of serum IgA against B. burgdorferi remains unclear. The production of intrathecal IgA has been noted in patients with the late Lyme disease manifestation, neuroborreliosis, but production of antigen-specific IgA during early disease has not been evaluated. In the current study, we assessed serum IgA binding to the B. burgdorferi peptide antigens, C6, the target of the FDA-cleared C6 EIA, and FlaB(211-223)-modVlsE(275-291), a peptide containing a Borrelia flagellin epitope linked to a modified VlsE sequence, in patients with early and late Lyme disease. Specific IgA was detected in 59 of 152 serum samples (38.8%) from early Lyme disease patients. Approximately 50% of early Lyme disease patients who were seropositive for peptide-specific IgM and/or IgG were also seropositive for peptide-specific IgA. In a subpopulation of patients, high peptide-specific IgA could be correlated with disseminated disease, defined as multiple erythema migrans lesions, and neurological disease complications. These results suggest that there may be an association between elevated levels of antigen-specific IgA and particular disease manifestations in some patients with early Lyme disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Bacterial/blood
Borrelia burgdorferi/immunology
Immunoglobulin A/blood
Lyme Disease/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antigens, Bacterial/immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G/blood
Immunoglobulin M/blood
Lyme Disease/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Bacterial); 0 (Antigens, Bacterial); 0 (Immunoglobulin A); 0 (Immunoglobulin G); 0 (Immunoglobulin M)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 10740 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506103
[Au] Autor:Larson SR; Lee X; Paskewitz SM
[Ad] Address:Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Two Species of Peromyscus Mice Common in Northern Wisconsin.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Two species of mice, the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque; Rodentia: Cricetidae) and the woodland deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus (Wagner; Rodentia: Cricetidae), serve as reservoirs of tick-borne pathogens in many parts of North America. However, the role P. maniculatus plays in the amplification and maintenance of Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales: Ehrlichiaceae) and Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) is not well understood. In northern Wisconsin, from 2012 to 2014, 560 unique mice were captured at 83 sites distributed across five forests. P. leucopus was more likely infested with immature Ixodes scapularis compared to P. maniculatus (60.1 vs. 28.3%). Abundance of immature I. scapularis on P. leucopus (M = 2.69; SD = 3.53) was surprisingly low and even lower for P. maniculatus (M = 0.717; SD = 1.44). Both P. leucopus and P. maniculatus were infected with B. burgdorferi, 24.0 and 16.8%, respectively. The prevalence of A. phagocytophilum infection in P. leucopus (1.69%) was similar to that observed in P. maniculatus (4.73%). Nine of 10 mice co-infected with both pathogens were P. maniculatus, and there were more co-infections in this species than expected by chance (3.07 vs. 0.82%). Differences in the behavior and biology between these two mice species may contribute to the variation observed in the abundance of host-attached ticks and pathogen prevalence. These differences highlight a potential hazard of the failure to differentiate between these visually similar mice, but there is evidence that these two mice species can each serve as reservoirs for tick-borne pathogens that cause human disease in Wisconsin.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjy027

  6 / 10740 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29202704
[Au] Autor:Antonise-Kamp L; Beaujean DJMA; Crutzen R; van Steenbergen JE; Ruwaard D
[Ad] Address:National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Centre for Infectious Disease Control, P.O. Box 1, 3720, BA, Bilthoven, the Netherlands. laura.kamp@rivm.nl.
[Ti] Title:Prevention of tick bites: an evaluation of a smartphone app.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;17(1):744, 2017 12 04.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common reported tick-borne infection in Europe, and involves transmission of Borrelia by ticks. As long as a vaccine is not available and effective measures for controlling tick populations are insufficient, LB control is focused on preventive measures to avoid tick bites. To inform citizens about the risk of ticks, motivate them to check for tick bites, and encourage them to remove any attached tick as quickly as possible, a mobile app called 'Tekenbeet' (Dutch for 'tick bite') was developed and released. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usage and user satisfaction of the 'Tekenbeet' app and to investigate whether it affects users' knowledge, perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, self-efficacy, response efficacy, current behavior and intention to comply with preventive measures. METHODS: Usage of the app was evaluated with data obtained from Google Analytics. A survey among the Dutch general adult population with two data collection periods evaluated the usage, user satisfaction and its influence on abovementioned outcomes. RESULTS: Data obtained from Google Analytics showed the app was downloaded almost 40,000 in the 20 months following the launch. The 'tick radar' and 'tick diary' screens were viewed most often. In addition, a total of 554 respondents completed an online survey. The mean user satisfaction score was 7.44 (on a scale of 1-10) and 90.9% of respondents would recommend the app to others. On average, survey respondents who downloaded the app (n = 243) recorded significantly more often higher knowledge scores (OR 3.37; 95% CI 2.02-5.09) and had a higher intention to comply with preventive measures (OR 2.47; 95% CI 1.22-5.85) compared to respondents who did not download the app (n = 311). CONCLUSIONS: The 'Tekenbeet' app is a frequently used and well-appreciated educational tool to increase public knowledge of ticks and tick bites. It also helps to improve the user's intention to apply preventive measures. The use of smartphones and apps is now commonplace in the Netherlands; the 'Tekenbeet' app feeds into this trend and thereby offers a modern day alternative to established formats such as an information leaflet and information provision on the Internet.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lyme Disease/prevention & control
Mobile Applications
Smartphone
Tick Bites
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Lyme Disease/epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data
Mobile Applications/utilization
Netherlands/epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Smartphone/utilization
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-017-2836-4

  7 / 10740 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29420552
[Au] Autor:Krause PJ; Carroll M; Fedorova N; Brancato J; Dumouchel C; Akosa F; Narasimhan S; Fikrig E; Lane RS
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Human Borrelia miyamotoi infection in California: Serodiagnosis is complicated by multiple endemic Borrelia species.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191725, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To determine whether human Borrelia miyamotoi infection occurs in the far-western United States, we tested archived sera from northwestern California residents for antibodies to this emerging relapsing fever spirochete. These residents frequently were exposed to I. pacificus ticks in a region where B. miyamotoi tick infection has been reported. We used a two-step B. miyamotoi rGlpQ assay and a B. miyamotoi whole-cell lysate (WCL) assay to detect B. miyamotoi antibody. We also employed Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia burgdorferi WCL assays to examine if these Borrelia induce cross reacting antibody to B. miyamotoi. Sera were collected from 101 residents in each of two consecutive years. The sera of 12 and 14 residents in years one and two, respectively, were B. miyamotoi rGlpQ seroreactive. Sufficient sera were available to test 15 of the 26 seropositive samples using B. miyamotoi and B. hermsii WCL assays. Two residents in year one and seven residents in year two were seroreactive to both Borrelia antigens. Although discernible differences in seroreactivity were evident between the B. miyamotoi and B. hermsii WCL assays, infection with one or the other could not be determined with certainty. Sera from two Borrelia burgdorferi /B. miyamotoi seropositive subjects reacted strongly against B. miyamotoi and B. hermsii WCL antigens. Ecological, epidemiological, and clinical data implicated B. miyamotoi as the probable cause of infection among those whose sera reacted against both antigens. Our findings suggest that human B. miyamotoi infection occurs in northern California and that B. hermsii and B. burgdorferi infections produce antibodies that cross-react with B. miyamotoi antigens. Health care professionals in the far-western United States should be aware that B. miyamotoi disease may occur throughout the geographic distribution of I. pacificus and that improved relapsing fever group spirochete antibody assays are urgently needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191725

  8 / 10740 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29480382
[Au] Autor:Schellekens MMI; van Alebeek ME; Arntz RM; Synhaeve NE; Maaijwee NAMM; Schoonderwaldt HC; van der Vlugt MJ; van Dijk EJ; Rutten-Jacobs LCA; de Leeuw FE
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Center for Neuroscience, RadboudUMC, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Prothrombotic factors do not increase the risk of recurrent ischemic events after cryptogenic stroke at young age: the FUTURE study.
[So] Source:J Thromb Thrombolysis;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1573-742X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The role of hypercoagulable states and preceding infections in the etiology of young stroke and their role in developing recurrent ischemic events remains unclear. Our aim is to determine the prevalence of these conditions in patients with cryptogenic stroke at young age and to assess the long-term risk of recurrent ischemic events in patients with and without a hypercoagulable state or a recent pre-stroke infection with Borrelia or Syphilis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We prospectively included patients with a first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke, aged 18-50, admitted to our hospital between 1995 and 2010. A retrospective analysis was conducted of prothrombotic factors and preceding infections. Outcome was recurrent ischemic events. RESULTS: Prevalence of prothrombotic factors did not significantly differ between patients with a cryptogenic stroke and with an identified cause (24/120 (20.0%) and 32/174 (18.4%) respectively). In patients with a cryptogenic stroke the long-term risk [mean follow-up of 8.9 years (SD 4.6)] of any recurrent ischemic event or recurrent cerebral ischemia did not significantly differ between patients with and without a hypercoagulable state or a recent infection. In patients with a cryptogenic stroke 15-years cumulative risk of any recurrent ischemic event was 24 and 23% in patients with and without any prothrombotic factor respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of prothrombotic factors and preceding infections did not significantly differ between stroke patients with a cryptogenic versus an identified cause of stroke and neither is significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic events after cryptogenic stroke.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11239-018-1631-4

  9 / 10740 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29478885
[Au] Autor:Lieske DJ; Lloyd VK
[Ad] Address:Department of Geography and Environment, Mount Allison University, 144 Main Street, Sackville, New Brunswick, E4L 1A7, Canada. Electronic address: dlieske@mta.ca.
[Ti] Title:Combining public participatory surveillance and occupancy modelling to predict the distributional response of Ixodes scapularis to climate change.
[So] Source:Ticks Tick Borne Dis;, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1877-9603
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ixodes scapularis, a known vector of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (Bbss), is undergoing range expansion in many parts of Canada. The province of New Brunswick, which borders jurisdictions with established populations of I. scapularis, constitutes a range expansion zone for this species. To better understand the current and potential future distribution of this tick under climate change projections, this study applied occupancy modelling to distributional records of adult ticks that successfully overwintered, obtained through passive surveillance. This study indicates that I. scapularis occurs throughout the southern-most portion of the province, in close proximity to coastlines and major waterways. Milder winter conditions, as indicated by the number of degree days <0 °C, was determined to be a strong predictor of tick occurrence, as was, to a lesser degree, rising levels of annual precipitation, leading to a final model with a predictive accuracy of 0.845 (range: 0.828-0.893). Both RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 climate projections predict that a significant proportion of the province (roughly a quarter to a third) will be highly suitable for I. scapularis by the 2080s. Comparison with cases of canine infection show good spatial agreement with baseline model predictions, but the presence of canine Borrelia infections beyond the climate envelope, defined by the highest probabilities of tick occurrence, suggest the presence of Bbss-carrying ticks distributed by long-range dispersal events. This research demonstrates that predictive statistical modelling of multi-year surveillance information is an efficient way to identify areas where I. scapularis is most likely to occur, and can be used to guide subsequent active sampling efforts in order to better understand fine scale species distributional patterns.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 10740 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29478884
[Au] Autor:Norte AC; Costantini D; Araújo PM; Eens M; Ramos JA; Heylen D
[Ad] Address:Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; Center for Vector and Infectious Diseases Research, National Institute of Health Doutor Ricardo Jorge, Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: acgnorte@ci.uc.pt.
[Ti] Title:Experimental infection by microparasites affects the oxidative balance in their avian reservoir host the blackbird Turdus merula.
[So] Source:Ticks Tick Borne Dis;, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1877-9603
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:By draining resources, microparasites can negatively affect the host fitness, which in turn can result in reduced transmission when virulence leads to reductions in host population size. Therefore, for a microparasite to persist in nature, the level of harm it can do to its host is expected to be limited. We tested this hypothesis for tick-borne Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) infections in the blackbird Turdus merula, one of the most important avian reservoir hosts in Europe. Experimental and observational data were combined to examine the physiological effects caused by B. burgdorferi s.l. infection in blackbirds. Pathogen-free blackbirds were exposed to B. burgdorferi s.l.-infected Ixodes ricinus and I. frontalis nymphs, and compared with a control group (exposed to naïve laboratory-derived I. ricinus nymphs). Their physiological status was evaluated before and after infection with B. burgdorferi s.l., through a set of immunological (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, haptoglobin, white blood cell count and heterophil/lymphocyte ratio), oxidative stress (glutathione peroxidase activity, protein carbonyls and nitric oxide) and general body condition variables (body condition, glucose and haematocrit). Infected males showed higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins (increased levels of protein carbonyls), decreased glutathione peroxidase activity and increased body mass. Infected females had higher levels of glutathione peroxidase activity after infection by B. burgdorferi s.l. than the control group. No significant effects of B. burgdorferi s.l. infection were detected on erythrocyte sedimentation rate, haptoglobin, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, nitric oxide, glucose and haematocrit. The first experimental study on the effects of B. burgdorferi s.l. on its avian reservoir hosts shows that these bacteria may inflict non-negligible physiological costs. We speculate that during energetically demanding periods, these physiological costs may reduce host fitness and affect pathogen transmission.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher


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