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Search on : Brassica and napus [Words]
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[PMID]: 29408396
[Au] Autor:Wang W; Zhang H; Wei X; Yang L; Yang B; Zhang L; Li J; Jiang YQ
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, College of Life Sciences, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China.
[Ti] Title:Functional characterization of calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK) 2 gene from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in regulating reactive oxygen species signaling and cell death control.
[So] Source:Gene;651:49-56, 2018 Apr 20.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0038
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs), being Ser/Thr protein kinases found only in plants and some protozoans are calcium sensors that regulate diverse biological processes. However, the function and mode of CPKs in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) remain elusive. In this study, we identified CPK2 from oilseed rape as a novel regulator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death. BnaCPK2 was identified to be located at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Expression of BnaCPK2 was induced during Bax-induced cell death. Overexpression of the constitutively active form of BnaCPK2 led to significantly more accumulation of ROS and cell death than the full-length CPK2, which is supported by various measurements of physiological data. In addition, a quantitative RT-PCR survey revealed that the expression levels of a few marker genes are significantly changed as a result of CPK2 expression. Mating-based split ubiquitin system (mbSUS) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) were used to screen and confirm the BnaCPK2 interacting proteins. We identified and confirmed that CPK2 interacted with NADPH oxidase-like respiratory burst oxidase homolog D (RbohD), but not with RbohF. Based on its function and interacting partners, we propose that BnaCPK2 plays an important role in ROS and cell death control through interacting with RbohD.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brassica napus/genetics
Cell Death/genetics
Plant Proteins/genetics
Protein Kinases/genetics
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Brassica napus/enzymology
Cloning, Molecular
DNA, Plant
Plant Proteins/metabolism
Protein Kinases/metabolism
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Signal Transduction
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Plant); 0 (Plant Proteins); 0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); EC 2.7.- (Protein Kinases); EC 2.7.1.- (calcium-dependent protein kinase)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28837874
[Au] Autor:Halecki W; Klatka S
[Ad] Address:Department of Land Reclamation and Environmental Development, University of Agriculture, Al. Mickiewicza 24/28, 30-059 Kraków, Poland. Electronic address: wiktor.halecki@urk.edu.pl.
[Ti] Title:Long term growth of crop plants on experimental plots created among slag heaps.
[So] Source:Ecotoxicol Environ Saf;147:86-92, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2414
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Suppression of plant growth is a common problem in post-mining reclaimed areas, as coarse texture of soils may increase nitrate leaching. Assessing feasibility of using solid waste (precipitated solid matter) produced by water and sewage treatment processes in field conditions is very important in mine soil reclamation. Our work investigated the possibility of plant growth in a degraded site covered with sewage-derived sludge material. A test area (21m × 18m) was established on a mine soil heap. Experimental plant species included Camelina sativa, Helianthus annuus, Festuca rubra, Miscanthus giganteus, Amaranthus cruentus, Brassica napus, Melilotus albus, Beta vulgaris, and Zea mays. ANOVA showed sufficient water content and acceptable physical properties of the soil in each year and layer in a multi-year period, indicating that these species were suitable for phytoremediation purposes. Results of trace elements assays indicated low degree of contamination caused by Carbocrash waste material and low potential ecological risk for all plant species. Detrended correspondence analysis revealed that total porosity and capillary porosity were the most important variables for the biosolids among all water content related properties. Overall, crop plants were found useful on heavily degraded land and the soil benefited from their presence. An addition of Carbocrash substrate to mine soil improved the initial stage of soil reclamation and accelerated plant growth. The use of this substrate in phytoremediation helped to balance the content of nutrients, promoted plant growth, and increased plant tolerance to salinity. Sewage sludge-amended biosolids may be applied directly to agricultural soil, not only in experimental conditions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Crops, Agricultural/growth & development
Mining
Sewage/chemistry
Soil Pollutants/analysis
Soil/chemistry
Solid Waste/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biodegradation, Environmental
Biomass
Poland
Porosity
Surface Properties
Time Factors
Trace Elements/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Sewage); 0 (Soil); 0 (Soil Pollutants); 0 (Solid Waste); 0 (Trace Elements)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170825
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29405041
[Au] Autor:Ali E; Hussain N; Shamsi IH; Jabeen Z; Siddiqui MH; Jiang LX
[Ad] Address:Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Crop Gene Resources, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
[Ti] Title:Role of jasmonic acid in improving tolerance of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) to Cd toxicity.
[So] Source:J Zhejiang Univ Sci B;19(2):130-146, 2018 Feb..
[Is] ISSN:1862-1783
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The well-known detrimental effects of cadmium (Cd) on plants are chloroplast destruction, photosynthetic pigment inhibition, imbalance of essential plant nutrients, and membrane damage. Jasmonic acid (JA) is an alleviator against different stresses such as salinity and drought. However, the functional attributes of JA in plants such as the interactive effects of JA application and Cd on rapeseed in response to heavy metal stress remain unclear. JA at 50 µmol/L was observed in literature to have senescence effects in plants. In the present study, 25 µmol/L JA is observed to be a "stress ameliorating molecule" by improving the tolerance of rapeseed plants to Cd toxicity. JA reduces the Cd uptake in the leaves, thereby reducing membrane damage and malondialdehyde content and increasing the essential nutrient uptake. Furthermore, JA shields the chloroplast against the damaging effects of Cd, thereby increasing gas exchange and photosynthetic pigments. Moreover, JA modulates the antioxidant enzyme activity to strengthen the internal defense system. Our results demonstrate the function of JA in alleviating Cd toxicity and its underlying mechanism. Moreover, JA attenuates the damage of Cd to plants. This study enriches our knowledge regarding the use of and protection provided by JA in Cd stress.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1631/jzus.B1700191

  4 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29385601
[Au] Autor:Landero JL; Wang LF; Beltranena E; Bench CJ; Zijlstra RT
[Ad] Address:Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Feed preference of weaned pigs fed diets containing soybean meal, Brassica napus canola meal, or Brassica juncea canola meal.
[So] Source:J Anim Sci;96(2):600-611, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1525-3163
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Brassica napus and Brassica juncea canola meal (CM) may replace soybean meal (SBM) in pig diets, but differ in fiber, glucosinolates content and profile. Preference of weaned pigs provided double-choice selections to diets containing 20% SBM, B. napus CM, or B. juncea CM was evaluated in two studies. In experiment 1, 216 pigs (9.4 ± 1.6 kg initial BW) were housed in 27 pens of 8 pigs (four gilts and four barrows). In experiment 2, 144 pigs (8.9 ± 1.1 kg) were housed in 36 pens of 4 pigs (two gilts and two barrows). Pigs were offered three dietary choices: B. napus CM with SBM as reference (B. napus CM [SBM]), B. juncea CM with SBM as reference (B. juncea CM [SBM]), and B. juncea CM with B. napus CM as reference (B. juncea CM [B. napus CM]) in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square. Diets were formulated to provide 2.4 Mcal NE/kg and 4.5 g standardized ileal digestible Lys/Mcal NE and were balanced using canola oil and crystalline AA. Each pair of diets was offered in two self-feeders per pen as mash (experiment 1) or pellets (experiment 2) during three test-periods of 4-d, followed by a 3-d non-test period when a common diet was offered in both feeders. Feeders with different diets were rotated daily among pens during preference periods for both experiments, and feeder positions (right or left) were switched daily in experiment 2. Prior to the study and between periods, pigs were fed non-test diets containing SBM (experiment 1) or without test feedstuffs (experiment 2). Overall in both experiments, pigs preferred (P < 0.001) SBM over B. napus and B. juncea CM diets, and preferred (P < 0.001) B. napus over B. juncea CM diet. Dietary choice did not affect (P > 0.05) growth performance in both experiments, except for greater G:F (P < 0.05) for pigs fed the B. juncea CM [B. napus CM] diets than pigs fed the B. napus CM [SBM] or B. juncea CM [SBM] diets in experiment 1. In conclusion, weaned pigs preferred SBM over CM diets when given a choice, and preferred B. napus over the B. juncea diet that contained more total glucosinolates especially gluconapin. Weaned pigs fed the B. juncea CM [B. napus CM] diets in the double-choice selection did not reduce feed intake, weight gain, and G:F compared to pigs fed the B. napus CM [SBM] or B. juncea CM [SBM] diets.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/jas/skx052

  5 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29511814
[Au] Autor:Yang L; Ye C; Zhao Y; Cheng X; Wang Y; Jiang YQ; Yang B
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, College of Life Sciences, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi, China.
[Ti] Title:An oilseed rape WRKY-type transcription factor regulates ROS accumulation and leaf senescence in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis through modulating transcription of RbohD and RbohF.
[So] Source:Planta;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2048
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:MAIN CONCLUSION: Overexpression of BnaWGR1 causes ROS accumulation and promotes leaf senescence. BnaWGR1 binds to promoters of RbohD and RbohF and regulates their expression. Manipulation of leaf senescence process affects agricultural traits of crop plants, including biomass, seed yield and stress resistance. Since delayed leaf senescence usually enhances tolerance to multiple stresses, we analyzed the function of specific MAPK-WRKY cascades in abiotic and biotic stress tolerance as well as leaf senescence in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), one of the important oil crops. In the present study, we showed that expression of one WRKY gene from oilseed rape, BnaWGR1, induced an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell death and precocious leaf senescence both in Nicotiana benthamiana and transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). BnaWGR1 regulates the transcription of two genes encoding key enzymes implicated in production of ROS, that is, respiratory burst oxidase homolog (Rboh) D and RbohF. A dual-luciferase reporter assay confirmed the transcriptional regulation of RbohD and RbohF by BnaWGR1. In vitro electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that BnaWGR1 could bind to W-box cis-elements within promoters of RbohD and RbohF. Moreover, RbohD and RbohF were significantly upregulated in transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing BnaWGR1. In summary, these results suggest that BnaWGR1 could positively regulate leaf senescence through regulating the expression of RbohD and RbohF genes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00425-018-2868-z

  6 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29385269
[Au] Autor:Sen R; Sharma S; Kaur G; Banga SS
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, Punjab, India.
[Ti] Title:Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy calibrations for assessment of oil, phenols, glucosinolates and fatty acid content in the intact seeds of oilseed Brassica species.
[So] Source:J Sci Food Agric;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0010
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Very few near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) calibration models are available for non-destructive estimation of seed quality traits in Brassica juncea. Those that are available also fail to adequately discern variation for oleic acid (C ) linolenic (C ) fatty acids, meal glucosinolates and phenols. We report the development of a new NIRS calibration equation that is expected to fill the gaps in the existing NIRS equations. RESULTS: Calibrations were based on the reference values of important quality traits estimated from a purposely selected germplasm set comprising 240 genotypes of B. juncea and 193 of B. napus. We were able to develop optimal NIRS-based calibration models for oil, phenols, glucosinolates, oleic acid, linoleic acid and erucic acid for B. juncea and B. napus. Correlation coefficients (RSQ) of the external validations appeared greater than 0.7 for the majority of traits, such as oil (0.766, 0.865), phenols (0.821, 0.915), glucosinolates (0.951, 0.986), oleic acid (0.814. 0.810), linoleic acid (0.974, 0.781) and erucic acid (0.963, 0.943) for B. juncea and B. napus, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the robust predictive power of the developed calibration models for rapid estimation of many quality traits in intact rapeseed-mustard seeds which will assist plant breeders in effective screening and selection of lines in quality improvement breeding programmes. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/jsfa.8919

  7 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29249026
[Au] Autor:Nafees M; Ali S; Naveed M; Rizwan M
[Ad] Address:Institute of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Faisalabad, 38040, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Efficiency of biogas slurry and Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN to improve growth, physiology, and antioxidant activity of Brassica napus L. in chromium-contaminated soil.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;25(7):6387-6397, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Contamination of soil is a major problem globally with colligated danger for ecosystem and human health. Chromium (Cr) is a toxic heavy metal and caused harmful effect on growth and development of plants. Phytostabilization reduced the mobility of heavy metals with addition of amendments which can significantly decrease metal solubility in soil. Phytostabilization can be achieved by application of biogas slurry (BGS) and endophytic bacteria as amendments in the contaminated soils. The present study revealed that the Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN and BGS improved the growth, physiology, and antioxidant activity and reduced Cr uptake under a pot experiment spiked with Cr (20 mg kg soil). The experiment was designed under completely randomized design, four treatments with three replications in normal and Cr-contaminated soil. The inoculation of endophytic bacteria improved the growth and physiology of Brassica. This study showed that the inoculation of endophytic bacteria stabilized the Cr levels in soil and minimized the uptake by the plant shoots and roots in BGS-amended soil. Similarly, activity of antioxidants such as catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and glutathione s-transferase (GST) was decreased to normal with combined treatment of BGS and endophytic bacteria in Cr-stressed soil. Overall, the best results were analyzed by combined treatment of BGS and endophytic bacteria to improve growth, physiology, and antioxidant activity of Brassica and immobilize Cr in soil. Moreover, results emphasized the need to use BGS alone or in combination with endophytic bacteria to optimize crop performance, stabilize Cr concentration, and improve environmental efficiency.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-017-0924-z

  8 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500810
[Au] Autor:Mattila P; Mäkinen S; Eurola M; Jalava T; Pihlava JM; Hellström J; Pihlanto A
[Ad] Address:Natural Resources Institute, 20520, Turku, Finland. pirjo.mattila@luke.fi.
[Ti] Title:Nutritional Value of Commercial Protein-Rich Plant Products.
[So] Source:Plant Foods Hum Nutr;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1573-9104
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The goal of this work was to analyze nutritional value of various minimally processed commercial products of plant protein sources such as faba bean (Vicia faba), lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), rapeseed press cake (Brassica rapa/napus subsp. Oleifera), flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum), oil hemp seed (Cannabis sativa), buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), and quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa). Basic composition and various nutritional components like amino acids, sugars, minerals, and dietary fiber were determined. Nearly all the samples studied could be considered as good sources of essential amino acids, minerals and dietary fiber. The highest content of crude protein (over 30 g/100 g DW) was found in faba bean, blue lupin and rapeseed press cake. The total amount of essential amino acids (EAA) ranged from 25.8 g/16 g N in oil hemp hulls to 41.5 g/16 g N in pearled quinoa. All the samples studied have a nutritionally favorable composition with significant health benefit potential. Processing (dehulling or pearling) affected greatly to the contents of analyzed nutrients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11130-018-0660-7

  9 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29494698
[Au] Autor:Li Q; Chen Y; Yue F; Qian W; Song H
[Ad] Address:College of Horticulture and Landscape, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.
[Ti] Title:Microspore culture reveals high fitness of B. napus-like gametes in an interspecific hybrid between Brassica napus and B. oleracea.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0193548, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The strategies of crossing B. napus with parental species play important role in broadening and improving the genetic basis of B. napus by the introgression of genetic resources from parental species. With these strategies, it is easy to select new types of B. napus, but difficult to select new types of B. rapa or B. oleracea by self-pollination. This characteristic may be a consequence of high competition with B. napus gametes. To verify the role of gamete viability in producing new B. napus individuals, the meiotic chromosome behavior of the interspecific hybrid between B. napus (Zhongshuang 9) and B. oleracea (6m08) was studied, and microspore-derived (MD) individuals were analyzed. The highest fitness of the 9:19 (1.10%) pattern was observed with a 5.49-fold higher than theoretical expectation among the six chromosome segregation patterns in the hybrid. A total of 43 MD lines with more than 14 chromosomes were developed from the hybrid, and 8 (18.6%) of them were B. napus-like (n = 19) type gametes, having the potential to broaden the genetic basis of natural B. napus (GD = 0.43 ± 0.04). It is easy to produce B. napus-like gametes with 19 chromosomes, and these gametes showed high fitness and competition in the microspore-derived lines, suggesting it might be easy to select new types of B. napus from the interspecific hybrid between B. napus and B. oleracea.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0193548

  10 / 5195 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29243152
[Au] Autor:Pandolfo CE; Presotto A; Carbonell FT; Ureta S; Poverene M; Cantamutto M
[Ad] Address:Dpto. Agronomía, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), San Andrés 800, 8000, Bahía Blanca, Argentina. cpandolfo@cerzos-conicet.gob.ar.
[Ti] Title:Transgene escape and persistence in an agroecosystem: the case of glyphosate-resistant Brassica rapa L. in central Argentina.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;25(7):6251-6264, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Brassica rapa L. is an annual Brassicaceae species cultivated for oil and food production, whose wild form is a weed of crops worldwide. In temperate regions of South America and especially in the Argentine Pampas region, this species is widely distributed. During 2014, wild B. rapa populations that escaped control with glyphosate applications by farmers were found in this area. These plants were characterized by morphology and seed acidic profile, and all the characters agreed with B. rapa description. The dose-response assays showed that the biotypes were highly resistant to glyphosate. It was also shown that they had multiple resistance to AHAS-inhibiting herbicides. The transgenic origin of the glyphosate resistance in B. rapa biotypes was verified by an immunological test which confirmed the presence of the CP4 EPSPS protein and by an event-specific GT73 molecular marker. The persistence of the transgene in nature was confirmed for at least 4 years, in ruderal and agrestal habitats. This finding suggests that glyphosate resistance might come from GM oilseed rape crops illegally cultivated in the country or as a seed contaminant, and it implies gene flow and introgression between feral populations of GM B. napus and wild B. rapa. The persistence and spread of the resistance in agricultural environments was promoted by the high selection pressure imposed by intensive herbicide usage in the prevalent no-till farming systems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-017-0726-3


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