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[PMID]: 29522824
[Au] Autor:Vallés D; Cantera AMB
[Ad] Address:Laboratorio de Enzimas Hidrolíticas, Instituto de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República, 11400 Montevideo, Uruguay. Electronic address: dvalles@fq.edu.uy.
[Ti] Title:Antiacanthain A: New proteases isolated from Bromelia antiacantha Bertol. (Bromeliaceae).
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Crude extract (CE) from pulp of Bromelia antiacantha Bertol. mature fruit, contains at least 3 cysteine proteases with proteolytic activity. By single step cation exchange chromatography (Hi-trap SP-HP) of partially purified CE, the protease with the lowest pI, Antiacanthain A (AntA), was isolated. It showed maximum activity at pH 9, and 75% of remaining activity was maintained over a wide pH range (pH 6-10). The AntA activity exhibits a constant increase up to 70 °C. Maintains almost 100% of its activity at 45 at pH 6 and 9. A 60% of AntA was active by titration with specific inhibitor, E64. Amidasic activity was studied with pyroglutamyl-phenyl-leucyl-paranitroaniline (PFLNA) substrate having higher AntA catalytic efficiency of (kcat/Km = 470 s M ) relative to stem bromelain (kcat/Km = 305 s M ). Esterase activity using p-nitrophenyl esters of N-α-CBZ-l-Lysine (z-L-LysONp) showed a 10-fold higher catalytic efficiency for AntA (kcat/Km = 6376 s M ) relative to stem bromelain (kcat/Km = 688 s M ). Incubation with 8 M Urea did not affect AntA activity and remained unchanged for 18 h, with 6 M GndHCl resulted in a 41% decrease in activity after 30 min incubation, maintained this activity 18 h. AntA exhibits high sequence identity with proteases of the Bromeliaceae family.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 29513779
[Au] Autor:Detoni AM; Carvalho SLC; Hoshino AT; Pastório MA; Schmidt MAH; Menezes Junior AO; Androcioli HG
[Ad] Address:Instituto Agronômico do Paraná - IAPAR, Polo de Santa Tereza do Oeste, Rodovia BR 132, Km 188, CEP 85825-000, Santa Tereza do Oeste, PR, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:First report of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, [1858]) (Lepidotera: Noctuidae) Injurious to Pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) (Bromeliaceae) in Brazil.
[So] Source:Braz J Biol;:0, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1678-4375
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29505686
[Au] Autor:Morales-Linares J; García-Franco JG; Flores-Palacios A; Valenzuela-González JE; Mata-Rosas M; Díaz-Castelazo C
[Ad] Address:Red de Ecología Funcional.
[Ti] Title:Orchid seed removal by ants in Neotropical ant-gardens.
[So] Source:Plant Biol (Stuttg);, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8677
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Most plants that inhabit in ant-gardens (AGs) are cultivated by ants. Some orchids occur in AGs, however, it is unknown if their seeds are dispersed by AG ants, because most of the orchid seeds are tiny and dispersed by wind. We performed in situ seed removal experiments, in which we simultaneously provided Azteca gnava ants with seeds of three AG orchid species and of another three AG epiphyte species (Bromeliaceae, Cactaceae and Gesneriaceae), as well as the non-AG orchid species Catasetum integerrimum. The seeds most removed were those of the bromeliad Aechmea tillandsioides and of the gesneriad Codonanthe uleana, while seeds of AG orchids Coryanthes picturata, Epidendrum flexuosum and Epidendrum pachyrachis were less removed. The non-AG orchid was not removed. Removal values were positively correlated with the frequency of the AG epiphytes in the AGs, and seeds of AG orchids were larger than those of non-AG orchids, which should favour the myrmecochory. Our data show that Azt. gnava ants discriminate and preferentially remove seeds of the AG epiphytes. We report for the first time the removal of AG orchid seeds by AG ants in Neotropical AGs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/plb.12715

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[PMID]: 29417698
[Au] Autor:Meireles JE; Manos PS
[Ad] Address:Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA.
[Ti] Title:Pervasive migration across rainforest and sandy coastal plain Aechmea nudicaulis (Bromeliaceae) populations despite contrasting environmental conditions.
[So] Source:Mol Ecol;, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1365-294X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Understanding the colonization of extreme marginal habitats and the relative roles of space and environment in maintaining peripheral populations remains challenging. Here, we leverage a system of pairs of rainforest and sandy coastal plain communities that allow us to decouple spatial and environmental effects in the population structure and migration rates of the bromeliad Aechmea nudicaulis. Structure and gene flow between populations were estimated from Bayesian clustering and coalescent-based migration models applied to chloroplast sequence and nuclear microsatellite data. Contrary to our initial expectation, the sharp environmental gradient between rainforest and sandy plains does not seem to have affected the colonization and migration dynamics in A. nudicaulis. Our analyses uncover pervasive gene flow between neighbouring habitats in both chloroplast and nuclear data despite the striking differences in environmental conditions. This result is consistent with a scenario of repeated colonization of the sandy coastal plains from forest populations through seed dispersal, as well as the maintenance of gene flow between habitats through pollination. We also recovered a broad north/south population structure that has been found in other Atlantic rainforest groups and possibly reflects older phylogeographic dynamics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/mec.14512

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[PMID]: 29466635
[Au] Autor:Elizalde V; García JR; Peña-Valdivia CB; Ybarra MC; Leyva OR; Trejo C
[Ti] Title:Viabilidad y germinación de semillas de Hechtia perotensis (Bromeliaceae). [Viability and germination of Hechtia perotensis (Bromeliaceae) seed].
[So] Source:Rev Biol Trop;65(1):153-65, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0034-7744
[Cp] Country of publication:Costa Rica
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Endemic populations of Hechtia perotensis have been described in Puebla and Veracruz, Mexico. Good quality seed collections can be used in conservation, research and ecological restoration. To evaluate seed quality of wild and endemic species, some compounds are used as effective promoters of germination, such as potassium nitrate (KNO3) and gibberellic acid (AG3), because they increase seed germination capacity and reduce latency. The triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (tetrazolium) test correlates seed viability because it is based on the activity of dehydrogenases in live tissues that catalyze mitochondrial respiration. The objective of this study was to obtain information on size and weight of capsules and seeds and seed germination and viability of H. perotensis, collected in Veracruz in the year 2012 and 2015. The hypotheses were 1) that seed germination and viability are independent of the year of collection, 2) that there is a tetrazolium concentration that can identify seed viability better than others, and 3) that pretreatment with KNO3 or AG3 improves seed germination. Seed germination was assessed using a completely randomized design with three treatments (control and the germination promoters 0.2 % KNO3 and 500 mg/L AG3), four treatments for the viability test (control, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 % of tetrazolium) and six replicates for each treatment. A total of one hundred seeds for germination experiments, and 25 seeds for the viability test were used. The results between and within years were analyzed with ANOVA and multiple comparison with the Tukey test. The proportion of non-germinated seeds was quantified along with the number of normal and abnormal seedlings, seeds with viable embryo, seeds without embryo, and seeds with low or no viability. On average, for the 2012 collected sample, 36 % had viable embryos, 7 % had low viability, 24 % were not viable and 33 % had no embryo. This result was significantly different from the 2015 sample, for which 87 % of seed showed viable embryos, 10 % had low viability, 0 % was not viable and 3 % had no embryo. Seed germination was also significantly different between years (22 and 92 %) Pregerminative treatments did not improve germination. Seed germination and viability of H. perotensis significantly varied between years of seed collection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 341 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29462338
[Au] Autor:Natália Pereira P; Gaspar M; Andrew C Smith J; Mercier H
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany, Institute of Biosciences, University of São Paulo, CEP, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:NH4+ intensifies CAM photosynthesis and counteracts drought effects in Guzmania monostachia by increasing malate transport and antioxidant capacity.
[So] Source:J Exp Bot;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Guzmania monostachia (Bromeliaceae) is a tropical epiphyte capable of upregulating crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in its photosynthetic tissues in response to changing nutrient and water availability. Previous studies have shown that under drought there is a gradient of increasing CAM expression from the basal (youngest) to apical (oldest) portion of the leaves, and additionally that nitrogen deficiency can further increase CAM intensity in the leaf apex of this bromeliad. The present study investigated the interrelationships between nitrogen source (nitrate and/or ammonium) and water deficit in regulating CAM expression in G. monostachia leaves. Highest CAM activity was observed under ammonium nutrition in combination with water deficit. This was associated with enhanced activity of the key enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, elevated rates of ATP- and PPi-dependent proton transport at the vacuolar membrane in the presence of malate, and increased transcript levels of the vacuolar malate channel, ALMT. Water deficit was consistently associated with higher levels of total soluble sugars, which were maximal under ammonium nutrition, as were the activities of several antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX and GR). Thus, ammonium nutrition, whilst associated with the highest degree of CAM induction in G. monostachia, also mitigates the effects of water deficit by osmotic adjustment and can limit oxidative damage in the leaves of this bromeliad under conditions that may be typical of its epiphytic habitat.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jxb/ery054

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[PMID]: 29461786
[Au] Autor:de Souza EH; Massarioli AP; Moreno IAM; Souza FVD; Ledo CAS; Alencar SM; Martinelli AP
[Ti] Title:Volatile compounds profile of Bromeliaceae flowers.
[So] Source:Rev Biol Trop;64(3):1101-16, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0034-7744
[Cp] Country of publication:Costa Rica
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Volatile compounds play a vital role in the life cycle of plants, possessing antimicrobial and anti-herbivore activities, and with a significant importance in the food, cosmetic, chemical, and pharmaceutical industry. This study aimed to identify the volatile compounds emitted by flowers of thirteen species belonging to four genera of Bromeliaceae, using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction and detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 71 volatile compounds belonging to nine chemical groups were identified. The compounds identified represented more than 97 % of the major components in Aechmea bicolor, Ae. bromeliifolia, Ae. distichantha, Ae. fasciata, and Vriesea friburgensis. In the Ananas varieties, over 99 % of the components were identified, and around 90 % in V. simplex. V. friburgensis presented the largest diversity of volatiles with 31 compounds, while Alcantarea nahoumii presented only 14. All three Ananas varieties presented the same 28 compounds in relatively similar abundance, which has been confirmed by principal component analysis. Current taxonomy and pollination syndrome studies available can adequately explain the variation in volatile compounds among species.
[Pt] Publication type:RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 341 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29307830
[Au] Autor:Guo C; Li H; Xia X; Liu X; Yang L
[Ad] Address:Agricultural Big-Data Research Center, College of Information Science and Engineering, College of Plant Protection, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, China.
[Ti] Title:Functional and evolution characterization of SWEET sugar transporters in Ananas comosus.
[So] Source:Biochem Biophys Res Commun;496(2):407-414, 2018 02 05.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2104
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sugars will eventually be exported transporters (SWEETs) are a group of recently identified sugar transporters in plants that play important roles in diverse physiological processes. However, currently, limited information about this gene family is available in pineapple (Ananas comosus). The availability of the recently released pineapple genome sequence provides the opportunity to identify SWEET genes in a Bromeliaceae family member at the genome level. In this study, 39 pineapple SWEET genes were identified in two pineapple cultivars (18 AnfSWEET and 21 AnmSWEET) and further phylogenetically classified into five clades. A phylogenetic analysis revealed distinct evolutionary paths for the SWEET genes of the two pineapple cultivars. The MD2 cultivar might have experienced a different expansion than the F153 cultivar because two additional duplications exist, which separately gave rise to clades III and IV. A gene exon/intron structure analysis showed that the pineapple SWEET genes contained highly conserved exon/intron numbers. An analysis of public RNA-seq data and expression profiling showed that SWEET genes may be involved in fruit development and ripening processes. AnmSWEET5 and AnmSWEET11 were highly expressed in the early stages of pineapple fruit development and then decreased. The study increases the understanding of the roles of SWEET genes in pineapple.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ananas/genetics
Carrier Proteins/genetics
Fruit/genetics
Gene Expression Regulation, Plant
Genome, Plant
Phylogeny
Plant Proteins/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Sequence
Ananas/classification
Ananas/growth & development
Ananas/metabolism
Biological Evolution
Carrier Proteins/metabolism
Chromosome Mapping
Exons
Fruit/growth & development
Fruit/metabolism
Gene Duplication
Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
Introns
Plant Proteins/metabolism
Sequence Alignment
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Sugars/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Carrier Proteins); 0 (Plant Proteins); 0 (Sugars)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180109
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 341 MEDLINE  
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SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 29236853
[Au] Autor:Souza EH; Souza FVD; Rossi ML; Packer RM; Cruz-Barros MAV; Martinelli AP
[Ad] Address:Universidade de São Paulo, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Av. Centenário, 303, São Dimas, Caixa Postal 96, 13400-970 Piracicaba, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Pollen morphology and viability in Bromeliaceae.
[So] Source:An Acad Bras Cienc;89(4):3067-3082, 2017 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1678-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pollen morphology characterization is important in taxonomy, conservation and plant breeding, and pollen viability studies can support breeding programs. This study investigated pollen morphology and male fertility in 18 species of Bromeliaceae with ornamental potential. For morphological characterization, pollen grains were acetolyzed and characterization of exine was done using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Pollen viability was investigated by in vitro germination and histochemical tests. Species belonging to Aechmea and Ananas genera presented medium size pollen, except for Ae. fasciata, with large pollen. Al. nahoumii, P. sagenarius and the Vriesea species analyzed showed large pollen, except for V. carinata, with very large pollen. Pollen of Aechmea, Ananas and P. sagenarius presented bilateral symmetry, diporate, exine varying from tectate to semitectate. Al. nahoumii and Vriesea species presented pollen with bilateral symmetry, monocolpate; exine was semitectate, reticulate and heterobrochate. Germination percentage and tube growth were greater in SM and BKM media. Histochemical tests showed pollen viability above 70% for all species, except for Ananas sp. (40%). Pollen morphology is important for the identification of species, especially in this family, which contains a large number of species. High rates of viability favor fertilization and seed production, essential for efficient hybrid production and conservation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180103
[Lr] Last revision date:180103
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 341 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28863374
[Au] Autor:Li P; Zhang R; Gu M; Zheng G
[Ad] Address:College of Resource and Environment, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109, Shandong, China.
[Ti] Title:Uptake of the natural radioactive gas radon by an epiphytic plant.
[So] Source:Sci Total Environ;612:436-441, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1026
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Radon ( Rn) is a natural radioactive gas and the major radioactive contributor to human exposure. The present effective ways to control Rn contamination are ventilation and adsorption with activated carbon. Plants are believed to be negligible in reducing airborne Rn. Here, we found epiphytic Tillandsia brachycaulos (Bromeliaceae) was effective in reducing airborne Rn via the leaves. Rn concentrations in the Rn chamber after Tillandsia plant treatments decreased more than those in the natural situation. The specialized foliar trichomes densely covering Tillandsia leaves play a major role in the uptake of Rn because the amplified rough leaf surface area facilitates deposition of Rn progeny particles and the powdery epicuticular wax layer of foliar trichomes uptakes liposoluble Rn. The results provide us a new ecological strategy for Rn contamination control, and movable epiphytic Tillandsia plants can be applied widely in Rn removal systems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 180103
[Lr] Last revision date:180103
[St] Status:In-Process


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