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[PMID]: 29495031
[Au] Autor:Buzalaf MAR; Magalhães AC; Rios D
[Ad] Address:Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Alameda Octávio Pinheiro Brisolla, 9-75, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil 17,012-901.
[Ti] Title:Prevention of erosive tooth wear: targeting nutritional and patient-related risks factors.
[So] Source:Br Dent J;224(5):371-378, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5373
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This article provides an overview of the nutritional and patient-related risk factors involved in the aetiology of erosive tooth wear (ETW) and the preventive strategies to counteract them. The first step is to diagnose clinical signs of ETW and to recognise causal factors. Low pH and high buffer capacity of foods/drinks are the major risk factors, while the calcium concentration is the main protective factor. Reduction of frequency of consumption and contact time of erosive foods/drinks with the teeth, use of straws appropriately positioned and consumption of dairy products are advisable. Oral hygiene has a role in the development of ETW, however, postponing toothbrushing is not clinically advisable. In cases of drug abuse, chronic alcoholism, GERD or bulimia, the patient must be referred to a doctor. Immediately after vomiting, patients might be advised to rinse the mouth. Saliva has an important protective role and patients with reduced salivary flow can benefit from the use of chewing gum. Recent studies have focused on improving the protective capacity of the acquired pellicle as well as on the role of protease inhibitors on dentine erosion. However, the degree of evidence for these preventive measures is low. Clinical trials are necessary before these measures can be recommended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.173

  2 / 9699 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29228517
[Au] Autor:Watson HJ; McLagan N; Zerwas SC; Crosby RD; Levine MD; Runfola CD; Peat CM; Moessner M; Zimmer B; Hofmeier SM; Hamer RM; Marcus MD; Bulik CM; Crow SJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB #7160, 101 Manning Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599. hunna_watson@med.unc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Cost-Effectiveness of Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Bulimia Nervosa: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:J Clin Psychiatry;79(1), 2018 Jan/Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1555-2101
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa (CBT-BN) compared to face-to-face delivery of CBT-BN. METHODS: This study is a planned secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial. Participants were 179 adults (98% female, mean age = 28 years) meeting DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa who were randomized to group face-to-face or group Internet-based CBT-BN for 16 sessions during 20 weeks. The cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted from a third-party payor perspective, and a partial societal perspective analysis was conducted to investigate cost-utility (ie, cost per gain in quality-adjusted life-years) and patient out-of-pocket travel-related costs. Net health care costs were calculated from protocol and nonprotocol health care services using third-party payor cost estimates. The primary outcome measure in the clinical trial was abstinence from binge eating and purging, and the trial start and end dates were 2008 and 2016. RESULTS: The mean cost per abstinent patient at posttreatment was $7,757 (95% confidence limit [CL], $4,515, $13,361) for face-to-face and $11,870 (95% CL, $6,486, $22,188) for Internet-based CBT-BN, and at 1-year follow-up was $16,777 (95% CL, $10,298, $27,042) for face-to-face and $14,561 (95% CL, $10,165, $21,028) for Internet-based CBT-BN. There were no statistically significant differences between treatment arms in cost-effectiveness or cost-utility at posttreatment or 1-year follow-up. Out-of-pocket patient costs were significantly higher for face-to-face (mean [95% CL] = $178 [$127, $140]) than Internet-based ($50 [$50, $50]) therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Third-party payor cost-effectiveness of Internet-based CBT-BN is comparable with that of an accepted standard. Internet-based dissemination of CBT-BN may be a viable alternative for patients geographically distant from specialist eating disorder services who have an unmet need for treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00877786​.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 9699 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516384
[Au] Autor:Strand M
[Ad] Address:Stockholm Centre for Eating Disorders, Wollmar Yxkullsgatan 27B, 118 50, Stockholm, Sweden. mattias.strand@ki.se.
[Ti] Title:René Girard and the Mimetic Nature of Eating Disorders.
[So] Source:Cult Med Psychiatry;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1573-076X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:French historian and literary critic René Girard (1923-2015), most widely known for the concepts of mimetic desire and scapegoating, also engaged in the discussion of the surge of eating disorders in his 1996 essay Eating Disorders and Mimetic Desire. This article explores Girard's ideas on the mimetic nature and origin of eating disorders from a clinical psychiatric perspective and contextualizes them within the field of eating disorders research as well as in relation to broader psychological, sociological and anthropological models of social comparison and non-consumption. Three main themes in Girard's thinking on the topic of eating disorders are identified and explored: the 'end of prohibitions' as a driving force in the emergence of eating disorders, eating disorders as a phenomenon specific to modernity, and the significance of 'conspicuous non-consumption' in the emergence of eating disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11013-018-9574-y

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[PMID]: 29504350
[Au] Autor:Rasheed MA; Kashif A; Naz A; Ali S
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Combined Military Hospital Gujranwala, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Accidental Ingestion Of Toothbrush: An Unusual Foreign Body.
[So] Source:J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad;30(1):130-132, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1819-2718
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Toothbrush is a rare foreign body to be ingested accidentally. The unusual shape of the toothbrush with no theoretical possibility of spontaneous passage mandates an interventional approach. If left untreated, it can lead to pressure necrosis, bleeding, perforation and ulceration. An endoscopic attempt in an expert clinic if available is the ideal approach. If failed, surgical management by laparoscope or mini laparotomy should be done. The evaluation for underlying psychiatric disorders like bulimia, schizophrenia or generalized eating disorder should be considered to prevent such recurrence. Here, we present a case of 55 years of age, male living a normal life with no known comorbid, who ingested accidentally a toothbrush two weeks prior to presentation and was managed at our surgical department after a failed endoscopic attempt.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 9699 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498331
[Au] Autor:Kress IU; Paslakis G; Erim Y
[Ad] Address:Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) Schloßplatz 4 91054 Erlangen Germany FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg.
[Ti] Title:Differential Diagnoses of Food-Related Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: A Review of Literature.
[So] Source:Z Psychosom Med Psychother;64(1):4-15, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1438-3608
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The present review investigates the prevalence and medical causes of food-related gastrointestinal symptoms in eating disorder (ED) patients and recommends a diagnostic algorithm based on the current literature. METHODS: A literature search was conducted, which included publications from January 2000 until January 2017 Results: Over 90% of ED patients suffer from food-related symptoms. There is no evidence for a higher prevalence of immunological or structural gastrointestinal disorders in ED patients compared to the healthy population. Most food-related symptoms in ED patients are likely to be functional. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnostic work-up of food-related symptoms in ED patients needs to be based on clinical history. Only if timing and quality of symptoms point towards a disorder independent from the ED is a comprehensive diagnostic work-up necessary.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.13109/zptm.2018.64.1.4

  6 / 9699 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29366932
[Au] Autor:Stojek M; Shank LM; Vannucci A; Bongiorno DM; Nelson EE; Waters AJ; Engel SG; Boutelle KN; Pine DS; Yanovski JA; Tanofsky-Kraff M
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Emory University School of Medicine, Emory Veterans Program, 12 Executive Park Drive, Atlanta, GA, 30329, USA.
[Ti] Title:A systematic review of attentional biases in disorders involving binge eating.
[So] Source:Appetite;123:367-389, 2018 04 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Attentional bias (AB) may be one mechanism contributing to the development and/or maintenance of disordered eating. AB has traditionally been measured using reaction time in response to a stimulus. Novel methods for AB measurement include eye tracking to measure visual fixation on a stimulus, and electroencephalography to measure brain activation in response to a stimulus. This systematic review summarizes, critiques, and integrates data on AB gathered using the above-mentioned methods in those with binge eating behaviors, including binge eating, loss of control eating, and bulimia nervosa. METHOD: Literature searches on PubMed and PsycInfo were conducted using combinations of terms related to binge eating and biobehavioral AB paradigms. Studies using AB paradigms with three categories of stimuli were included: food, weight/shape, and threat. For studies reporting means and standard deviations of group bias scores, Hedges' g effect sizes for group differences in AB were calculated. RESULTS: Fifty articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Individuals who binge eat in the absence of compensatory behaviors show an increased AB to food cues, but few studies have examined such individuals' AB toward weight/shape and threatening stimuli. Individuals with bulimia nervosa consistently show an increased AB to shape/weight cues and socially threatening stimuli, but findings for AB to food cues are mixed. DISCUSSION: While there are important research gaps, preliminary evidence suggests that the combination of AB to disorder-specific cues (i.e., food and weight/shape) and AB toward threat may be a potent contributor to binge eating. This conclusion underscores previous findings on the interaction between negative affect and AB to disorder-specific cues. Recommendations for future research are provided.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., INTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 9699 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29493805
[Au] Autor:Linardon J; Hindle A; Brennan L
[Ad] Address:School of Psychology, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Dropout from cognitive-behavioral therapy for eating disorders: A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.
[So] Source:Int J Eat Disord;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1098-108X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is efficacious for a range of eating disorder presentations, yet premature dropout is one factor that might limit CBTs effectiveness. Improved understanding of dropout from CBT for eating disorders is important. This meta-analysis aimed to study dropout from CBT for eating disorders in randomized controlled trials (RCTs), by (a) identifying the types of dropout definitions applied, (b) providing estimates of dropout, (c) comparing dropout rates from CBT to non-CBT interventions for eating disorders, and (d) testing moderators of dropout. METHOD: RCTs of CBT for eating disorders that reported rates of dropout were searched. Ninety-nine RCTs (131 CBT conditions) were included. RESULTS: Dropout definitions varied widely across studies. The overall dropout estimate was 24% (95% CI = 22-27%). Diagnostic type, type of dropout definition, baseline symptom severity, study quality, and sample age did not moderate this estimate. Dropout was highest among studies that delivered internet-based CBT and was lowest in studies that delivered transdiagnostic enhanced CBT. There was some evidence that longer treatment protocols were associated with lower dropout. No significant differences in dropout rates were observed between CBT and non-CBT interventions for all eating disorder subtypes. CONCLUSION: Present study dropout estimates are hampered by the use of disparate dropout definitions applied. This meta-analysis highlights the urgency for RCTs to utilize a standardized dropout definition and to report as much information on patient dropout as possible, so that strategies designed to minimize dropout can be developed, and factors predictive of CBT dropout can be more easily identified.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/eat.22850

  8 / 9699 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29492960
[Au] Autor:Dold M; Bartova L; Mendlewicz J; Souery D; Serretti A; Porcelli S; Zohar J; Montgomery S; Kasper S
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:Clinical correlates of augmentation/combination treatment strategies in major depressive disorder.
[So] Source:Acta Psychiatr Scand;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0447
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This multicenter, multinational, cross-sectional study aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes associated with augmentation/combination treatment strategies in major depressive disorder (MDD). METHOD: Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment features of 1410 adult MDD patients were compared between MDD patients treated with monotherapy and augmentation/combination medication using descriptive statistics, analyses of covariance (ancova), and Spearman's correlation analyses. RESULTS: 60.64% of all participants received augmentation and/or combination strategies with a mean number of 2.18 ± 1.22 simultaneously prescribed psychiatric drugs. We found male gender, older age, Caucasian descent, higher weight, low educational status, absence of occupation, psychotic symptoms, melancholic and atypical features, suicide risk, in-patient treatment, longer duration of hospitalization, some psychiatric comorbidities (panic disorder, agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and bulimia nervosa), comorbid somatic comorbidity in general and concurrent hypertension, thyroid dysfunction, diabetes, and heart disease in particular, higher current and retrospective Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total scores, treatment resistance, and higher antidepressant dosing to be significantly associated with augmentation/combination treatment. These findings were corroborated when examining the number of concurrently administered psychiatric drugs in the statistical analyses. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a clear association between augmentation/combination strategies and treatment-resistant/difficult-to-treat MDD conditions characterized by severe symptomatology and high amount of psychiatric and somatic comorbidities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/acps.12870

  9 / 9699 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29415831
[Au] Autor:Mathisen TF; Engen KM; Sundgot-Borgen J; Stensrud T
[Ad] Address:Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Department of Sports Medicine, Sognsveien 220, 0806 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: t.f.mathisen@nih.no.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of a short protocol for indirect calorimetry in females with eating disorders and healthy controls.
[So] Source:Clin Nutr ESPEN;22:28-35, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2405-4577
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To enable clinicians to identify the clinical picture and treatment progress and to adjust eating plans according to personal energy needs, it is important to know the patient's correct resting metabolic rate (RMR). Indirect calorimetry (IC) is the preferred method for assessment of RMR, but long duration of measurement increases the load on the patients, and reduces the effectiveness in clinical and scientific settings. Further; not all patients reach a valid RMR according to the suggested best practice protocol, with 5 min of steady state (SS) where respiratory gas volume exchange varies less than 10%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility for an abbreviated RMR protocol and SS criterion. METHODS: Forty two women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder (eating disorder group, ED), originally recruited for an outpatient treatment study, and 26 age and gender matched healthy controls (HC) were studied during a single, prolonged IC measurement. Participants rested for 10 min in supine position wearing a two-way breathing facemask, before a continuous measurement period of 20 min. Results from a standard 5 min SS criterion was compared to an abbreviated 3 min SS criterion. Both SS-criteria were evaluated through three different SS protocols (<10% variation in respiratory gas exchange), being: 1) measurement during the first 3 or 5 min, 2) measurement after discarding the first 5 min, and 3) the lowest identified RMR during the 20 min of measurement. RESULTS: About 50% of the participants reached an early SS in both the defined SS minute criteria. Participants reaching a valid SS throughout the 20 min of measurement increased from ∼90% to 100% with an abbreviated 3 min SS. With a 5 min SS criterion, the median (range) RMR for the 3 protocols were 1639.9 (1239.2), 1508.8 (1457.6) and 1500.6 (1328.8) respectively for the ED group, and 1702.2 (1239.4), 1608.4 (1076.4) and 1594.8 (1029.2) respectively for the HC group, (p > 0.05 for all between-group analysis). With a 3 min SS criterion, the median (range) RMR were 1533.6 (1298.2), 1461.2 (1406.1), and 1395.8 (1447.3) respectively for the ED group and 1681.7 (1332.4), 1613.7 (1266.0) and 1523.1 (1050.3), respectively for the HC group, (p > 0.05 for all between-group analysis). Lowest measured RMR was different compared to the other two SS protocols in both the ED- and the HC group, and for both the 5 min- and the 3 min SS criteria, respectively (p < 0.04). Furthermore, a SS of 3 min resulted in lower RMR compared to 5 min SS (p < 0.00) and an increased number of participants classified as hypo-metabolic (RMRmeasured/RMRcalculated < 0.9). CONCLUSIONS: An abbreviated measurement protocol to identify the lowest RMR using IC was not successful. Abbreviating the SS criteria from 5 to 3 min, resulted in a lower RMR, hence encouraging further examination of the validity of shorter SS criterion than practiced today. Registered in Clinical Trials by id-number NCT02079935, and approved by the Norwegian Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics with id-number 2013/1871. The trial in which control persons were recruited, is approved by the Norwegian Regional Committees for Medical and Health Research Ethics with the id-number 2016/1718, and prospectively registered in Clinical Trials with the id-number NCT03007459.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 9699 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29489041
[Au] Autor:Hofer PD; Wahl K; Meyer AH; Miché M; Beesdo-Baum K; Wong SF; Grisham JR; Wittchen HU; Lieb R
[Ad] Address:Division of Clinical Psychology and Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Obsessive-compulsive disorder and the risk of subsequent mental disorders: A community study of adolescents and young adults.
[So] Source:Depress Anxiety;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6394
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Comorbidity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with other mental disorders has been demonstrated repeatedly. Few longitudinal studies, however, have evaluated the temporal association of prior OCD and subsequent mental disorders across the age period of highest risk for first onset of mental disorders. We examined associations between prior OCD and a broad range of subsequent mental disorders and simulated proportions of new onsets of mental disorders that could potentially be attributed to prior OCD, assuming a causal relationship. METHODS: Data from 3,021 14- to 24-year-old community subjects were prospectively collected for up to 10 years. DSM-IV OCD and other DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed with the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview. We used adjusted time-dependent proportional hazard models to estimate the temporal associations of prior OCD with subsequent mental disorders. RESULTS: Prior OCD was associated with an increased risk of bipolar disorders (BIP; [hazard ratio, HR = 6.9, 95% confidence interval, CI, (2.8,17.3)], bulimia nervosa [HR = 6.8 (1.3,36.6)], dysthymia [HR = 4.4 (2.1,9.0)], generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; [HR = 3.4 (1.1,10.9)], and social phobia [HR = 2.9 (1.1,7.7)]). Of these outcome disorders, between 65 and 85% could be attributed to OCD in the exposed group, whereas between 1.5 and 7.7% could be attributed to OCD in the total sample. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides strong evidence that prior OCD is associated with an increased risk of subsequent onset of BIP, bulimia nervosa, dysthymia, GAD, and social phobia among adolescents and young adults. Future studies should evaluate if early treatment of OCD can prevent the onset of these subsequent mental disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/da.22733


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