Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Bunyaviridae and Infections [Words]
References found : 1435 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 144 go to page                         

  1 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29210509
[Au] Autor:Liang G; Li X; Gao X; Fu S; Wang H; Li M; Lu Z; Zhu W; Lu X; Wang L; Cao Y; He Y; Lei W
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Arboviruses and their related infections in China: A comprehensive field and laboratory investigation over the last 3 decades.
[So] Source:Rev Med Virol;28(1), 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1099-1654
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Since the 1980s, a comprehensive field and laboratory investigation has been conducted throughout China, and a total of 29 virus species belonging to 7 families and 13 genera were identified through virological, morphological, and immunological methods, as well as whole-genome sequencing and molecular genetic analyses. Most of the virus isolates belong to 9 genera in the families Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Togaviridae, and Reoviridae. Among them, 4 genera (Orthobunyavirus, Bunyavirus, Phlebovirus, and Nairovirus) belong to the family Bunyaviridae and 3 genera (Seadonavirus, Orbivirus, and Cypovirus) belong to the family Reoviridae. Analyses of the relationships between viruses and human/animal diseases indicated that Japanese encephalitis virus, dengue virus, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, West Nile virus, and Tahyna virus can cause human and animal infections and disease epidemics in China. This review systematically introduces the current status of the diversity and geographical distribution of arboviruses and vectors in China. In addition, our results provide strong technical support for the prevention and control of arboviral diseases, the treatment of epidemics, and the early warning and prediction of diseases, and so they are significant for the control and prevention of arboviral diseases in Asia and around the world.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/rmv.1959

  2 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29148370
[Au] Autor:Ramírez de Arellano E; Hernández L; Goyanes MJ; Arsuaga M; Cruz AF; Negredo A; Sánchez-Seco MP
[Ti] Title:Phylogenetic Characterization of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Spain.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;23(12):2078-2080, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Two cases of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever were reported in Spain during 2016. We obtained the virus from a patient sample and characterized its full genomic sequence. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the virus corresponds to the African genotype III, which includes viruses previously found in West and South Africa.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2312.171002

  3 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29107849
[Au] Autor:Maclachlan NJ; Osburn BI
[Ad] Address:School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Electronic address: njmaclachlan@ucdavis.edu.
[Ti] Title:Teratogenic bluetongue and related orbivirus infections in pregnant ruminant livestock: timing and pathogen genetics are critical.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Virol;27:31-35, 2017 Nov 03.
[Is] ISSN:1879-6265
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Congenital infections of domestic animals with viruses in several families, including Bunyaviridae, Flaviridae, Parvoviridae, and Reoviridae, are the cause of naturally occurring teratogenic central nervous system and/or musculoskeletal defects (arthrogryposis) in domestic animals. Congenital infections of ruminant livestock with bluetongue virus (BTV) and some related members of the genus Orbivirus (family Reoviridae) have clearly shown the critical role of gestational age at infection in determining outcome. Specifically, fetuses infected prior to mid-gestation that survive congenital BTV infection are born with cavitating central nervous system defects that range from severe hydranencephaly to cerebral cysts (porencephaly). Generally, the younger the fetus (in terms of gestational age) at infection, the more severe the teratogenic lesion at birth. Age-dependent virus infection and destruction of neuronal and/or glial cell precursors that populate the developing central nervous system are responsible for these naturally occurring virus-induced congenital defects of animals, thus lesions are most severe when progenitor cells are infected prior to their normal migration during embryogenesis. Whereas congenital infection is characteristic of certain BTV strains, notably live-attenuated (modified-live) vaccine viruses that have been passaged in embryonating eggs, transplacental transmission is not characteristic of many field strains of the virus and much remains to be determined regarding the genetic determinants of transplacental transmission of individual virus strains.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171106
[Lr] Last revision date:171106
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29091706
[Au] Autor:Pauvolid-Corrêa A; Campos Z; Soares R; Nogueira RMR; Komar N
[Ad] Address:Arbovirus Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Fort Collins, CO, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Neutralizing antibodies for orthobunyaviruses in Pantanal, Brazil.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(11):e0006014, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Pantanal is a hotspot for arbovirus studies in South America. Various medically important flaviviruses and alphaviruses have been reported in domestic and wild animals in the region. To expand the knowledge of local arbovirus circulation, a serosurvey for 14 Brazilian orthobunyaviruses was conducted with equines, sheep and free-ranging caimans. Sera were tested for specific viral antibodies using plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Monotypic reactions were detected for Maguari, Xingu, Apeu, Guaroa, Murutucu, Oriboca, Oropouche and Nepuyo viruses. Despite the low titers for most of the orthobunyaviruses tested, the detection of monotypic reactions for eight orthobunyaviruses suggests the Pantanal as a region of great orthobunyavirus diversity. The present data, in conjunction with previous studies that detected a high diversity of other arboviruses, ratify the Pantanal as an important natural reservoir for sylvatic and medically important arboviruses in Brazil.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alligators and Crocodiles
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood
Antibodies, Viral/blood
Bunyaviridae Infections/veterinary
Horse Diseases/epidemiology
Orthobunyavirus/immunology
Sheep Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alligators and Crocodiles/virology
Animals
Animals, Domestic/virology
Animals, Wild/virology
Brazil/epidemiology
Bunyaviridae Infections/epidemiology
Bunyaviridae Infections/immunology
Bunyaviridae Infections/virology
Horse Diseases/immunology
Horse Diseases/virology
Horses/virology
Orthobunyavirus/isolation & purification
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sheep/virology
Sheep Diseases/immunology
Sheep Diseases/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Neutralizing); 0 (Antibodies, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171102
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006014

  5 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28948950
[Au] Autor:Yadav PD; Chaubal GY; Shete AM; Mourya DT
[Ad] Address:Maximum Containment Laboratory, ICMR-National Institute of Virology, Pune, India.
[Ti] Title:A mini-review of Bunyaviruses recorded in India.
[So] Source:Indian J Med Res;145(5):601-610, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:0971-5916
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Newly emerging and re-emerging viral infections are of major public health concern. Bunyaviridae family of viruses comprises a large group of animal viruses. Clinical symptoms exhibited by persons infected by viruses belonging to this family vary from mild-to-severe diseases i.e., febrile illness, encephalitis, haemorrhagic fever and acute respiratory illness. Several arthropods-borne viruses have been discovered and classified at serological level in India in the past. Some of these are highly pathogenic as the recent emergence and spread of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus and presence of antibodies against Hantavirus in humans in India have provided evidences that it may become one of the emerging diseases in this country. For many of the discovered viruses, we still need to study their relevance to human and animal health. Chittoor virus, a variant of Batai virus; Ganjam virus, an Asian variant of Nairobi sheep disease virus; tick-borne viruses such as Bhanja, Palma and mosquito-borne viruses such as Sathuperi, Thimiri, Umbre and Ingwavuma viruses have been identified as the members of this family. As Bunyaviruses are three segmented RNA viruses, they can reassort the segments into genetically distinct viruses in target cells. This ability is believed to play a major role in evolution, pathogenesis and epidemiology of the viruses. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of discovery, emergence and distribution of Bunyaviruses in India.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1871_15

  6 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 28948811
[Au] Autor:Zelená H; Rumlerová M; Kodras K; Berousková P; Mrázek J; Smetana J
[Ti] Title:Hantavirus jako puvodce smrtelné hemoragické horecky v Ceské republice. [Hantavirus causing fatal haemorrhagic fever in the Czech Republic].
[So] Source:Epidemiol Mikrobiol Imunol;66(3):149-152, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1210-7913
[Cp] Country of publication:Czech Republic
[La] Language:cze
[Ab] Abstract:Hantaviruses are RNA viruses of the family Bunyaviridae. Their hosts are mammals of the orders rodents (voles, rats, mice), insectivores (shrews, moles), and chiroptera (bats). Hantaviruses are present in many areas of Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. In the Czech Republic, the occurrence of five species of hantaviruses has been reported (Dobrava/Belgrade, Puumala, Tula, Seewis, and Asikkala), with the first three of them causing human diseases. Although the course of hantavirus infections can be very serious, there is a low awareness of these diseases, even among health professionals, and hantavirus is often not considered in the diagnosis. A case history is reported of a patient who developed hantavirus haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) with fatal outcome. The patient presented with typical clinical signs, but the correct diagnosis was only made at post mortem.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170926
[Lr] Last revision date:170926
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28937979
[Au] Autor:Yun SM; Park SJ; Park SW; Choi W; Jeong HW; Choi YK; Lee WJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Arboviruses, National Research Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cheongju-si, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Molecular genomic characterization of tick- and human-derived severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus isolates from South Korea.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(9):e0005893, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging tick-borne viral disease caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV) from Bunyaviridae that is endemic in East Asia. However, the genetic and evolutionary characteristics shared between tick- and human-derived Korean SFTSV strains are still limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we identify, for the first time, the genome sequence of a tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis)-derived Korean SFTSV strain (designated as KAGWT) and compare this virus with recent human SFTSV isolates to identify the genetic variations and relationships among SFTSV strains. The genome of the KAGWT strain is consistent with the described genome of other members of the genus Phlebovirus with 6,368 nucleotides (nt), 3,378 nt, and 1,746 nt in the Large (L), Medium (M) and Small (S) segments, respectively. Compared with other completely sequenced human-derived Korean SFTSV strains, the KAGWT strain had highest sequence identities at the nucleotide and deduced amino acid level in each segment with the KAGWH3 strain which was isolated from SFTS patient within the same region, although there is one unique amino acid substitution in the Gn protein (A66S). Phylogenetic analyses of complete genome sequences revealed that at least four different genotypes of SFTSV are co-circulating in South Korea, and that the tick- and human-derived Korean SFTSV strains (genotype B) are closely related to one another. Although we could not detect reassortant, which are commonly observed in segmented viruses, further large-scale surveillance and detailed genomic analysis studies are needed to better understand the molecular epidemiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of SFTSV. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Full-length sequence analysis revealed a clear association between the genetic origins of tick- and human-derived SFTSV strains. While the most prevalent Korean SFTSV is genotype B, at least four different genotypes of SFTSV strains are co-circulating in South Korea. These findings provide information regarding the molecular epidemiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of SFTSV in East Asia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Genome, Viral
Phlebovirus/genetics
Phlebovirus/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bunyaviridae Infections/complications
Bunyaviridae Infections/epidemiology
Bunyaviridae Infections/virology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Ixodidae/virology
Orthobunyavirus/genetics
Phlebovirus/pathogenicity
Phylogeny
Republic of Korea/epidemiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Syndrome
Thrombocytopenia/complications
Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology
Thrombocytopenia/virology
Tick-Borne Diseases/epidemiology
Tick-Borne Diseases/virology
Ticks/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171025
[Lr] Last revision date:171025
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170923
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005893

  8 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28934195
[Au] Autor:Jia B; Yan X; Chen Y; Wang G; Liu Y; Xu B; Song P; Li Y; Xiong Y; Wu W; Hao Y; Xia J; Zhang Z; Huang R; Wu C
[Ad] Address:Department of Infectious Diseases, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
[Ti] Title:A scoring model for predicting prognosis of patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(9):e0005909, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging epidemic infectious disease caused by the SFTS bunyavirus (SFTSV) with an estimated high case-fatality rate of 12.7% to 32.6%. Currently, the disease has been reported in mainland China, Japan, Korea, and the United States. At present, there is no specific antiviral therapy for SFTSV infection. Considering the higher mortality rate and rapid clinical progress of SFTS, supporting the appropriate treatment in time to SFTS patients is critical. Therefore, it is very important for clinicians to predict these SFTS cases who are more likely to have a poor prognosis or even more likely to decease. In the present study, we established a simple and feasible model for assessing the severity and predicting the prognosis of SFTS patients with high sensitivity and specificity. This model may aid the physicians to immediately initiate prompt treatment to block the rapid development of the illness and reduce the fatality of SFTS patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bunyaviridae Infections/diagnosis
Bunyaviridae Infections/pathology
Decision Support Techniques
Thrombocytopenia/diagnosis
Thrombocytopenia/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Bunyaviridae Infections/virology
China
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phlebovirus/isolation & purification
Prognosis
Sensitivity and Specificity
Thrombocytopenia/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170922
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005909

  9 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28930847
[Au] Autor:Rota E; Morelli N; Immovilli P; De Mitri P; Guidetti D
[Ad] Address:aNeurology Unit, Guglielmo da Saliceto Hospital, Piacenza bNeurology Unit, San Giacomo Hospital, Novi Ligure, Alessandria, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Guillain-Barré-like axonal polyneuropathy associated with Toscana virus infection: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(38):e8081, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Numerous cases of post-infectious Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) have been reported in the literature. Toscana virus (TOSV) is an arthropod-borne emerging pathogen in the Mediterranean area. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 40-year-old male patient was admitted to hospital for acute facial weakness, associated to numbness paraesthesias at lower and upper limbs. The neurological examination revealed facial diplegia and reduced tendon reflexes. The nerve conduction studies documented an acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN); the lumbar puncture detected albuminocytologic dissociation. Serology for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), mumps, and Borrelia was negative, as was cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) polymerase chain reaction assay for Herpes virus, Borrelia, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Cryptococcus, and Mycobacterium tubercolosis. Positivity for TOSV IgG antibodies was found on both CSF and serum; the patient remembered being recently exposed to mosquitoes. DIAGNOSES: The AMSAN subtype of GBS, subsequent to a TOSV infection, was diagnosed. INTERVENTIONS: The patient was treated with plasma-exchange with complete clinical recovery, but a relapse occurred 9 months later, when the nerve conduction studies confirmed the presence of an AMSAN, which benefited from oral steroids. OUTCOMES: A good clinical recovery was achieved after treatments. LESSONS: This is the first case, to the best of our knowledge, of a TOSV infection associated to a peripheral neuropathy mimicking a GBS syndrome, both clinically and electrophysiologically. The clinical spectrum of TOSV neurological complications seems to be wider than previously known: this should be taken into account by the scientific community and public health institutions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bunyaviridae Infections/complications
Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications
Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology
Sandfly fever Naples virus
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Bunyaviridae Infections/diagnosis
Facial Paralysis/virology
Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis
Humans
Immunoglobulin G/analysis
Male
Paresthesia/virology
Sandfly fever Naples virus/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Immunoglobulin G)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171015
[Lr] Last revision date:171015
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170921
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008081

  10 / 1435 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28895058
[Au] Autor:Anderson D; Beecher G; Power C; Bridgland L; Zochodne DW
[Ad] Address:Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute, University of Alberta, 7-132A Clinical Sciences Building, 11350-83 Ave, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G3, Canada.
[Ti] Title:A neuropathic pain syndrome associated with hantavirus infection.
[So] Source:J Neurovirol;, 2017 Sep 11.
[Is] ISSN:1538-2443
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hantaviruses are a group of single-stranded RNA viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. "New World" hantaviruses cause hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in North America. HCPS carries with it significant mortality and those patients who survive the disease are often left with substantial morbidity. Neurologic complications of hantavirus infections are rare, with only sparse cases of central nervous system involvement having been documented in the literature. To our knowledge, there are no reports of hantavirus infection contributing to peripheral nervous system dysfunction. Here we report a case of possible small fiber neuropathy associated with hantavirus infection, in a patient who survived HCPS. Persistent and treatment-resistant neuropathic pain may be a prominent feature in hantavirus-associated peripheral neuropathy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170912
[Lr] Last revision date:170912
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13365-017-0576-2


page 1 of 144 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information