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[PMID]: 29427981
[Au] Autor:Cockcroft DW
[Ad] Address:Division of Respiratory, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Environmental Causes of Asthma.
[So] Source:Semin Respir Crit Care Med;39(1):12-18, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1098-9048
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Environmental factors which cause asthma are those that induce airway inflammation with eosinophils (more common) or neutrophils along with airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The most common of these (indeed the most common cause of asthma) are IgE-mediated inhalant allergen exposures. Allergen-induced AHR and inflammation are both associated with the allergen-induced late asthmatic response (LAR). Although allergens were previously recognized only as causes of symptoms and bronchoconstriction in asthmatics, we now appreciate them as causes of the fundamental pathophysiologic features of asthma. Low-molecular-weight chemical sensitizers, causes of occupational asthma, also cause asthma in a manner analogous to allergen. Acute irritant-induced asthma (reactive airways dysfunction syndrome) following a very heavy irritant exposure and chronic irritant-induced asthma following repeated high exposures can also induce persistent or permanent changes (inflammation and AHR) consistent with asthma. Textile dust exposure produces a different form of airway disease (byssinosis) which is less frequently observed currently. Environmental exposure to tobacco smoke facilitates the development of asthma in children. Personal smoking and environmental air pollution have an inconsistent and likely generally small effect in causing asthma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180210
[Lr] Last revision date:180210
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0037-1606219

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[PMID]: 28805487
[Au] Autor:Roncati L; Barbolini G
[Ad] Address:a Department of Diagnostic and Clinical Medicine and of Public Health , University of Modena and Reggio Emilia , Modena , MO , Italy.
[Ti] Title:State-of-the-art nanopathological diagnostics.
[So] Source:Ultrastruct Pathol;41(5):309-311, 2017 Sep-Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1521-0758
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The nanopathological diagnostics (ND) is an ultra-specialized branch of pathological anatomy aimed to identify the nanoparticles of metallic, semimetallic, or nonmetallic elements in the inorganic particulate matter present inside pathological tissues, even on the nanometer scale. ND exploits an environmental scanning electron microscope, connected to an X-ray microprobe mounted on an energy-dispersive spectrometer. The searching of nanoparticles can be performed on paraffin-embedded material, omitting emissions of black overlay and plating procedures. The technique is highly sensitive and specific, reproducible and rapid, covering an entire operating cycle in few hours. Nowadays, ND finds many applications: (I) intratumor detection of heavy metals and endocrine metal disruptors; (II) identification of pathogenic nanoparticles in medical or veterinary drugs and devices, cosmetics, household products, and foodstuffs; (III) differential diagnosis of sarcoid-type granulomas (berylliosis, baritosis) and foreign body granulomas (prosthetic, iatrogenic); (IV) attestation of occupational disease correlating the datum with the occupational risk (anthracosis, asbestosis, bauxite fibrosis, byssinosis, chalicosis, siderosis, silicosis, stannosis, talcosis); and (V) forensic investigations to ascertain a causal link between disease and environmental, military, or work exposure. In addition to filling a knowledge gap, ND offers to the pathologist a current research field, with particular reference to the impact of occupational and environmental pollution on the human health and cancer.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170822
[Lr] Last revision date:170822
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/01913123.2017.1358227

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[PMID]: 28360462
[Au] Autor:Dangi BM; Bhise AR
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiotherapy, Government Spine Institute and Physiotherapy College, Civil Hospital Campus, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.
[Ti] Title:Cotton dust exposure: Analysis of pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms.
[So] Source:Lung India;34(2):144-149, 2017 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0970-2113
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cotton industry workers are exposed to various hazards in the different departments of textile factories. The major health problems associated with cotton dust are respiratory problems, byssinosis, bronchitis and asthma. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of cotton dust exposure on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at cotton mill in the Ahmedabad city. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred cotton mill workers of the weaving and spinning area participated in this study while 100 age- and gender-matched male subjects living in the residential area served as the control group. A questionnaire was used to inquire about respiratory symptoms and spirometry was done in both the groups. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Student's -test was used to find the difference between spirometric parameters, and Chi-square test was used to find the difference between respiratory symptoms. RESULTS: Respiratory symptoms were statistically significantly more common in the cotton mill workers compared to control group. Cotton mill workers group also showed significant ( < 0.0001) decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), ratio of FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) and peak expiratory flow rate, and no significant difference of FVC between groups. There was an association of duration of exposure and symptoms with spirometric abnormality. CONCLUSION: Cotton mill workers showed a significant decrease in spirometric parameters and increase in respiratory symptoms. As the duration of exposure and symptoms increased, spirometric abnormality increased.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0970-2113.201319

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[PMID]: 28051194
[Au] Autor:Anyfantis ID; Rachiotis G; Hadjichristodoulou C; Gourgoulianis KI
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Thessaly Medical School, Biopolis, Larissa 41110, Greece. yiannis4@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Respiratory Symptoms and Lung Function among Greek Cotton Industry Workers: A Cross-Sectional Study.
[So] Source:Int J Occup Environ Med;8(1):32-38, 2017 01.
[Is] ISSN:2008-6814
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Workers in cotton industry are occupationally exposed to various dust-related hazards. The nature of these agents and the respective exposure levels depend on the cotton industry specific sector. These exposures could be associated with respiratory symptoms and changes in lung function parameters. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate associations between occupational exposure and respiratory function as well as reported symptoms in several groups of workers at different stages of the cotton industry in a vertical approach that covers all the major sectors-from cotton ginning to weaving and fabric production. METHODS: A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and individual as well as workplace characteristics was completed by 256 workers at the cotton industry and 148 office workers (control group). Both groups underwent spirometry. RESULTS: Workers in cotton industry reported a higher prevalence of severe dyspnea (p=0.002) and wheezing (p=0.004) compared to the control group. Also they were found to have a lower predicted FEV % (p<0.029) and lower FEV /FVC (p<0.001) values. In addition, a higher prevalence of FEV % <80% (p<0.001) and FEV /FVC <70% (p=0.041) were found among textile workers. Similar results were found for non-smoker textile workers compared to non-smoker control group workers. Those working in cotton ginning mills recorded the highest decrease of spirometric values. Duration of employment in cotton industry and smoking use were found to be predictors of lung function decline for cotton industry workers. CONCLUSION: Occupational exposure to cotton dust was associated with increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms and obstructive pattern in pulmonary function test.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Occupational Exposure
Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology
Textile Industry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gossypium
Greece/epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Diseases/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171124
[Lr] Last revision date:171124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170105
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15171/ijoem.2017.888

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[PMID]: 28194087
[Au] Autor:Mittal R; Gupta P; Chhabra SK
[Ad] Address:Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Occupational bronchiolitis induced by cotton dust exposure in a nonsmoker.
[So] Source:Indian J Occup Environ Med;20(2):118-120, 2016 May-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0973-2284
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The most well-known disease caused by cotton dust is byssinosis though it is also associated with chronic obstructive airways disease, and very rarely, interstitial lung disease. Obliterative bronchiolitis has never been reported in this setting. We report a 63-year-old, nonsmoker male, who presented with complaints of cough and exertional dyspnoea for 10 years. He had worked in textile industry for 35 years and symptoms had persisted even after quitting. Examination revealed prolonged expiration with expiratory wheeze, and pulmonary function tests revealed severe airflow limitation with air trapping and impaired diffusion capacity. Arterial blood gas analysis showed type I respiratory failure. A high resolution computed tomogram of the chest showed bilateral centrilobular nodules with tree-in-bud pattern and areas of air trapping. A diagnosis of obliterative bronchiolitis induced by cotton dust exposure was established on the basis of the occupational history and the characteristic radiological signs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0019-5278.197550

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[PMID]: 27618081
[Au] Autor:Hinson AV; Lokossou VK; Schlünssen V; Agodokpessi G; Sigsgaard T; Fayomi B
[Ad] Address:Unit of Teaching and Research in Occupational Health and Environment, Faculty of Sciences of the Health, University of Abomey-Calavi, Abomey-Calavi, 01 PO 188 Cotonou, Benin. hinsvikkey@yahoo.fr.
[Ti] Title:Cotton Dust Exposure and Respiratory Disorders among Textile Workers at a Textile Company in the Southern Part of Benin.
[So] Source:Int J Environ Res Public Health;13(9), 2016 Sep 08.
[Is] ISSN:1660-4601
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The textile industry sector occupies a prominent place in the economy of Benin. It exposes workers to several occupational risks, including exposure to cotton dust. To assess the effect of exposure to cotton dust on the health of workers, this study was initiated and conducted in a Beninese cotton industry company. The objective of the study was to evaluate the respiratory disorders among the textile workers exposed to cotton dust and the cross-sectional study involved 656 subjects exposed to cotton dust and 113 non-exposed subjects. The methods used are mainly based on a survey using a questionnaire of organic dust designed by the International Commission of Occupational Health (ICOH); and on the measures of lung function parameters (FEV1 and FVC). The main results of the different analyzes revealed that subjects exposed to cotton dust have more respiratory symptoms than unexposed subjects (36.9% vs. 21.2%). The prevalence of chronic cough, expectorations, dyspnoea, asthma and chronic bronchitis are 16.8%, 9.8%, 17.3%, 2.6%, and 5.9% respectively among the exposed versus 2.6%, 0.8%, 16.8%, 0% and 0.8% among the unexposed subjects. The prevalence of byssinosis is 44.01%.The prevalence of symptoms is dependent on the sector of activity and the age of the subject. These results should encourage medical interventions and technical prevention especially since the textile industry occupies an important place in the Benin's economy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Air Pollutants, Occupational
Cotton Fiber
Dust
Gossypium
Occupational Exposure/adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Benin/epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Diseases/physiopathology
Textile Industry
Textiles
Vital Capacity
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Air Pollutants, Occupational); 0 (Dust)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170809
[Lr] Last revision date:170809
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160913
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27308960
[Au] Autor:Smolensky MH; Hermida RC; Reinberg A; Sackett-Lundeen L; Portaluppi F
[Ad] Address:a Department of Biomedical Engineering , Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin , Austin , TX , USA.
[Ti] Title:Circadian disruption: New clinical perspective of disease pathology and basis for chronotherapeutic intervention.
[So] Source:Chronobiol Int;33(8):1101-19, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1525-6073
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biological processes are organized in time as innate rhythms defined by the period (τ), phase (peak [Φ] and trough time), amplitude (A, peak-trough difference) and mean level. The human time structure in its entirety is comprised of ultradian (τ < 20 h), circadian (20 h > τ < 28 h) and infradian (τ > 28 h) bioperiodicities. The circadian time structure (CTS) of human beings, which is more complicated than in lower animals, is orchestrated and staged by a brain central multioscillator system that includes a prominent pacemaker - the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Additional pacemaker activities are provided by the pineal hormone melatonin, which circulates during the nighttime, and the left and right cerebral cortices. Under ordinary circumstances this system coordinates the τ and Φ of rhythms driven by subservient peripheral cell, tissue and organ clock networks. Cyclic environmental, feeding and social time cues synchronize the endogenous 24 h clocks and rhythms. Accordingly, processes and functions of the internal environment are integrated in time for maximum biological efficiency, and they are also organized and synchronized in time to the external environment to ensure optimal performance and response to challenge. Artificial light at night (ALAN) exposure can alter the CTS as can night work, which, like rapid transmeridian displacement by air travel, necessitates realignment of the Φ of the multitude of 24 h rhythms. In 2001, Stevens and Rea coined the phrase "circadian disruption" (CD) to label the CTS misalignment induced by ALAN and shift work (SW) as a potential pathologic mechanism of the increased risk for cancer and other medical conditions. Current concerns relating to the effects of ALAN exposure on the CTS motivated us to renew our long-standing interest in the possible role of CD in the etiopathology of common human diseases and patient care. A surprisingly large number of medical conditions involve CD: adrenal insufficiency; nocturia; sleep-time non-dipping and rising blood pressure 24 h patterns (nocturnal hypertension); delayed sleep phase syndrome, non-24 h sleep/wake disorder; recurrent hypersomnia; SW intolerance; delirium; peptic ulcer disease; kidney failure; depression; mania; bipolar disorder; Parkinson's disease; Smith-Magenis syndrome; fatal familial insomnia syndrome; autism spectrum disorder; asthma; byssinosis; cancers; hand, foot and mouth disease; post-operative state; and ICU outcome. Poorly conceived medical interventions, for example nighttime dosing of synthetic corticosteroids and certain ß-antagonists and cyclic nocturnal enteral or parenteral nutrition, plus lifestyle habits, including atypical eating times and chronic alcohol consumption, also can be causal of CD. Just as surprisingly are the many proven chronotherapeutic strategies available today to manage the CD of several of these medical conditions. In clinical medicine, CD seems to be a common, yet mostly unrecognized, pathologic mechanism of human disease as are the many effective chronotherapeutic interventions to remedy it.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 160830
[Lr] Last revision date:160830
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/07420528.2016.1184678

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[PMID]: 26489943
[Au] Autor:Er M; Emri SA; Demir AU; Thorne PS; Karakoca Y; Bilir N; Baris IY
[Ad] Address:Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey (Pulmonary Diseases Department). mukreminer@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Byssinosis and COPD rates among factory workers manufacturing hemp and jute.
[So] Source:Int J Occup Med Environ Health;29(1):55-68, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1896-494X
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Prior studies have been performed on cotton textile plants throughout the world. This study was planned to identify the rate of byssinosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in hemp and jute workers and those who worked with both of them. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was realized in a factory which consecutively processed hemp and jute. The study enrollment included 266 people, 164 of whom were active workers and 102 were retired. A questionnaire, plain chest X-rays, physical examination and pulmonary function tests were performed. Dust levels were measured in various sections of the factory during 8 h work shifts. Endotoxin levels of various quality hemp fibers and dusts were measured. RESULTS: The rate of byssinosis (28.2%) was higher among the workers that who exposed to both jute and hemp dust. The frequency of chronic bronchitis in retired workers who previously smoked was higher (20%) as compared to currently smoking workers (17%). High dust levels were measured in some parts of the factory (mean (M) = 2.69 mg/m3). Working in dense dust areas, active smoking, being older than 40 years of age, being an ex-smoker, and working in the factory for a period exceeding 15 years were significantly associated with bronchitis and emphysema development. High endotoxin levels were determined for fine hemp dust (605 EU/mg), coarse hemp dust (336 EU/mg) and poor quality hemp fibers (114 EU/mg), whereas in fresh hemp stalks the level of endotoxin was determined to be lower (0.27 EU/mg). CONCLUSIONS: Because of high exposures to jute and hemp dusts that are associated with high byssinosis rates, personal protection and environmental hygiene is crucial to prevention of byssinosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Byssinosis/epidemiology
Cannabis/adverse effects
Corchorus/adverse effects
Occupational Diseases/epidemiology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology
Textile Industry/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Bronchitis/epidemiology
Bronchitis/etiology
Byssinosis/etiology
Dust
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases/etiology
Occupational Exposure/adverse effects
Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Dust)
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 151022
[Lr] Last revision date:151022
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151023
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 26706959
[Au] Autor:Dutkiewicz J; Mackiewicz B; Lemieszek MK; Golec M; Milanowski J
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Health Hazards and Parasitology, Institute of Rural Health, Lublin, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens - focus on cotton dust.
[So] Source:Ann Agric Environ Med;22(4):576-88, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1898-2263
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola) is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor) that cause accumulation of platelets in pulmonary capillaries initiating an acute and chronic inflammation resulting in endothelial cell damage and extravasation of cells and fluids into the lung interstitium. These changes cause bronchoconstriction, the decrement of lung function expressed as reduction of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or diffusion capacity, increase in the airway hyperreactivity and subjective symptoms such as fever, airway irritation and chest tightness. The conclusions from these experiments, performed mostly 2-3 decades ago, did not loose their actuality until recently as so far no other cotton dust component was identified as a more important work-related hazard than bacterial endotoxin. Though also other microbial and plant constituents are considered as potential causative agents of byssinosis, the endotoxin produced by Pantoea agglomerans and other Gram-negative bacteria present in cotton dust is still regarded as a major cause of this mysterious disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Allergens/toxicity
Byssinosis/physiopathology
Cotton Fiber
Dust
Endotoxins/toxicity
Enterobacteriaceae Infections/physiopathology
Pantoea/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Allergens/immunology
Byssinosis/immunology
Byssinosis/microbiology
Dust/analysis
Enterobacteriaceae Infections/immunology
Enterobacteriaceae Infections/microbiology
Humans
Pantoea/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Allergens); 0 (Dust); 0 (Endotoxins)
[Em] Entry month:1609
[Cu] Class update date: 151228
[Lr] Last revision date:151228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151229
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5604/12321966.1185757

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[PMID]: 26024343
[Au] Autor:Gaffney A; Christiani DC
[Ad] Address:Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
[Ti] Title:Gene-environment interaction from international cohorts: impact on development and evolution of occupational and environmental lung and airway disease.
[So] Source:Semin Respir Crit Care Med;36(3):347-57, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1098-9048
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Environmental and occupational pulmonary diseases impose a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality on the global population. However, it has been long observed that only some of those who are exposed to pulmonary toxicants go on to develop disease; increasingly, it is being recognized that genetic differences may underlie some of this person-to-person variability. Studies performed throughout the globe are demonstrating important gene-environment interactions for diseases as diverse as chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, and pollution-associated asthma. These findings have, in many instances, elucidated the pathogenesis of these highly complex diseases. At the same time, however, translation of this research into clinical practice has, for good reasons, proceeded slowly. No genetic test has yet emerged with sufficiently robust operating characteristics to be clearly useful or practicable in an occupational or environmental setting. In addition, occupational genetic testing raises serious ethical and policy concerns. Therefore, the primary objective must remain ensuring that the workplace and the environment are safe for all.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lung Diseases/epidemiology
Occupational Diseases/epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing/ethics
Global Health
Humans
Lung Diseases/etiology
Occupational Diseases/etiology
Occupational Exposure/adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1602
[Cu] Class update date: 161025
[Lr] Last revision date:161025
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150530
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0035-1549450


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