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[PMID]: 29520387
[Au] Autor:Kang HW; Cho KS; Ham WS; Kang DH; Jung HD; Kwon JK; Choi YD; Lee JY
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Predictive factors and treatment outcomes of Steinstrasse following shock wave lithotripsy for ureteral calculi: A Bayesian regression model analysis.
[So] Source:Investig Clin Urol;59(2):112-118, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2466-054X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: This study aims to assess the predictive factors and treatment outcomes of Steinstrasse formation following shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) for ureter stone. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 1,418 ureter stone patients who underwent one-session SWL from November 2005 to May 2013 at our medical institute were retrospectively reviewed. Finally, 551 patients met inclusion criteria. Maximal length and location of stone, stone attenuation (Hounsfield units), and skin-to-stone distance (SSD) were determined on pretreatment non-contrast computed tomography. Results: Of 551 patients, 12 patients (2.2% of total cohort) developed Steinstrasse after one-session SWL. The Steinstrasse incidence was significantly associated with stone size, stone attenuation value, and SSD. Prophylactic ureter stenting was not a statistically significant predictor of Steinstrasse formation. After propensity-score matching, Steinstrasse group showed a significant shorter SSD compare to non-Steinstrasse group. Multivariate logistic regression and Bayesian analysis revealed that stone size, stone attenuation and SSD were significant predictor of Steinstrasse formation following SWL for ureter stone. The Steinstrasse resolved spontaneously in six patients and remaining six patients were treated by additional SWL. None of patients with Steinstrasse required ureteral stenting, percutaneous drainage, or consequent surgical intervention. Conclusions: Steinstrasse formation following SWL for ureter stone was rare event but nonnegligible. Large stone size, high stone attenuation and short SSD were significant predictors of Steinstrasse formation following SWL for ureter stone. Majority of patients with Steinstrasse formation could be treated conservatively in this clinical scenario.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4111/icu.2018.59.2.112

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[PMID]: 29524246
[Au] Autor:Jones ML; Dominguez BJ; Deveau MA
[Ad] Address:Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College Station, Texas.
[Ti] Title:An experimental model for calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats.
[So] Source:J Vet Intern Med;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1939-1676
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Calcium carbonate is a common urolith type in small ruminants with no high-yield experimental model to evaluate animal susceptibility or preventative measure response. HYPOTHESIS: That novel plastic winged implants would allow accumulation and quantification of calcium carbonate calculus formation in goats on a high-calcium diet and identify individual variation between goats in the mass of calculi produced. ANIMALS: Eight nonpregnant 3- and 4-year-old Boer-cross does, weighing 22.3-39.5 kg, determined to be healthy based on physical examination, were used in these experiments. METHODS: Prospective cohort study for in vivo experimental model development. Implants were placed into the urinary bladder lumen in 8 goats over 2 evaluation periods. The alfalfa-based ration had a total ration Ca : P of 3.29 and 3.84 : 1, respectively. Urine was collected at 0, 28, 56, and 84 days in the 1st experiment; blood and urine at those timepoints in the 2nd experiment. For each evaluation period, the implants were removed 84 days after implantation and weighed. Accumulated calculi mass was calculated and compared between goats and was analyzed for composition. RESULTS: Implant retention was 100% and 86% in the 2 studies. All goats with retained implants accumulated calcium carbonate at a mean implant gain per day across studies ranging from 0.44 to 57.45 mg. Two goats accumulated (0.44-7.65 mg/day and 33.64 & 57.45 mg/day) significantly more urolith material than the cohort across both studies (P = .047). No routine analytes on blood or urine were found to be explanatory for the difference observed. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: These findings form a basis for implant and diet selection for use in future studies of urolithiasis development and for studies regarding individual susceptibility to urolithiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jvim.15061

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[PMID]: 29376598
[Au] Autor:Arustamov LD; Katibov MI; Merinov DS; Gurbanov SS; Artemov AV; Epishov VA
[Ad] Address:N.A. Lopatkin Scientific Research Institute of Urology and Interventional Radiology branch of the NMRRC of Minzdrav of Russia, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Analysis of clinical effectiveness and risk factors for complication of percutaneous nephrolototripsia in patients with a solitary kidney].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):65-71, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:RELEVANCE: Management of patients with large and staghorn stones of a solitary kidney is widely debated among urologists and has not been sufficiently investigated, which determined the relevance of this study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study comprised 80 patients with large (>20 mm) and staghorn stones of an anatomically or functionally solitary kidney. Of them, 58 patients underwent percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL), and 22 had open surgery. The criterion of the treatment effectiveness was the complete stone clearance or small residual fragments sized less than 3 mm. The safety criterion was the absence of intra- and postoperative complications, according to Clavien-Dindo grading system. The study analyzed the following factors influencing the effectiveness and safety of PNL: the number of accesses; nephroscope diameter; use of a nephroscope sheath; type of lithotripter; size, density, type and composition of the stone. RESULTS: Percutaneous nephrolithotripsy demonstrated statistically significantly better safety results compared with open surgery with comparable effectiveness. Long-term stone recurrence rate after PNL and open surgery was 10.4 and 18.2%, respectively. PNL resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the kidney function while it worsened after open surgery. The effectiveness of PNL depends on the stone type and size and the kind of lithotripter. It was 7.5 times greater for a large stone than for staghorn calculi and 4.6 times higher for stones sized less or equal 45 mm than for those sized > 45 mm. Ultrasonic lithotripter was 2.2 times more effective than another type of lithotripter. The safety of PNL depends on the nephroscope diameter, of a sheath, the number of accesses, the type of lithotripter and the type of stone. Using a 24-Ch nephroscope was 3.6 times safer than that with a diameter greater than 24-Ch; not using a sheath was 3.2 times safer than using it; one access was 3 times safer than at multiple ones; using an ultrasound lithotripter was 2.7 times safer than with another type of lithotripter; treating a large stone was 2.1 times safer than a staghorn stone. CONCLUSION: The study findings can be used to optimize the treatment of patients with large and staghorn stones of a solitary kidney.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Kidney Calculi
Kidney
Nephrolithotomy, Percutaneous/methods
Postoperative Complications/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kidney/diagnostic imaging
Kidney/surgery
Kidney Calculi/diagnostic imaging
Kidney Calculi/surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrolithotomy, Percutaneous/adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 47448 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29374814
[Au] Autor:Diaz-Convalia E; Arrabal-Polo MA; Cano-Garcia MDC; Dominguez-Amillo A; Canales-Casco N; Arrabal-Martin M
[Ad] Address:Urology Department, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Plaza Ciudad de los Carmenes, 4, 6D, 18013, Granada, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Risk of renal stone formation in patients treated with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone analogues for prostate cancer: importance of bone metabolism and urine calcium.
[So] Source:Int Urol Nephrol;50(3):419-425, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2584
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To determine whether androgen blockade produces metabolic changes in urine and increases the risk of calculi after 1 year of treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 38 patients, from the period April 2015 to June 2016, diagnosed with locally advanced prostate cancer or lymph node metastasis, and with an indication of androgen blockade. Androgen blockade was started with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogues, and a blood specimen, a fasting urine and 24-h urine were collected at the time of inclusion, and then at 1 year of follow-up. A study was performed at baseline and at 1 year with imaging tests. An analysis of the variables was performed with a p ≤ 0.05 considered as statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients included in the study was 72.26 ± 6.75 years. As regards the biochemistry parameters, an increase in osteocalcin (from 16.28 ± 9.48 to 25.56 ± 12.09 ng/ml; p = 0.001) and an increase in ß-crosslaps (from 0.419 ± 0.177 to 0.743 ± 0.268 ng/ml; p = 0.0001) were observed. In the urinary parameters, a significant increase was observed in the fasting calcium/creatinine ratio (from 0.08 ± 0.06 to 0.13 ± 0.06; p = 0.002) and in the 24-h calcium renal excretion (from 117.69 ± 66.92 to 169.42 ± 107.18 mg; p = 0.0001). Calculi formation was observed in 12 of the 38 patients included (31.6%), with a mean size of 3.33 ± 1.31 mm. CONCLUSION: Treatment with LHRH analogues, as well as increasing the appearance of metabolic syndrome and speeding up the loss bone mineral density, causes an increase in fasting urine calcium.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11255-018-1793-1

  5 / 47448 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522293
[Au] Autor:Prattley S; Voss J; Cheung S; Geraghty R; Jones P; Somani BK
[Ad] Address:University Hospital Southampton, NHS Trust, United Kingdom, UK.
[Ti] Title:Ureteroscopy and stone treatment in the elderly (≥70 years): prospective outcomes over 5- years with a review of literature.
[So] Source:Int Braz J Urol;44, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1677-6119
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess outcomes of ureteroscopy for treatment of stone disease in the elderly. Ureteroscopy (URS) is an increasingly popular treatment modality for urolithiasis and its applications are ever expanding with the development of newer technologies. Its feasibility and outcomes within the elderly population to our knowledge remain under-reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the patient demographics and surgical outcomes from our prospective database for patients ≥70 years who underwent URS for urolithiasis, in a 5-year period between March 2012 and December 2016. RESULTS: A total of 110 consecutive patients underwent 121 procedures (1.1 procedure/ patient) with a mean age of 77.2 years (range: 70-91 years). Stone location was in the kidney/ pelviureteric junction (PUJ) in 29%, ureter in 37% and in multiple locations in 34%. The initial and final stone free rate (SFR) was 88% and 97% respectively. While 73% were done as true day case procedures, 89% patients were discharged within 24 hours. Eleven patients (9%) underwent complications of which 10 were Clavien I/II including acute urinary retention, urinary tract infection, stent symptoms and pneumonia. One patient underwent Clavien IV complication where they needed intensive care unit admission for urosepsis but fully recovered and were discharged home subsequently. CONCLUSION: Ureteroscopy is a safe and effective method of managing urolithiasis in elderly patients. Although most patients are discharged within 24-hours, consideration needs to be made for patients where social circumstances can impact their discharge planning.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2017.0516

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[PMID]: 29522290
[Au] Autor:Manzo BO; Lozada E; Vicentini FC; Sanchez FJ; Manzo G
[Ad] Address:Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidade do Bajío, México.
[Ti] Title:Differences in the percutaneous nephrolithotomy practice patterns among Latin American urologists with and without endourology training.
[So] Source:Int Braz J Urol;44, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1677-6119
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Although the worldwide percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) practice patterns determined via a survey sent to members of the Endourological Society have been published, differences in PCNL practice patterns among Latin American urologists based on endourological or lithiasis training have not been published. To determine the PCNL practice patterns among Latin American urologists with and without training in endourology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The SurveyMonkey® web platform was used to develop a 27- item survey on PCNL for the treatment of renal stones, and the survey was sent via e-mail and other electronic media to 2000 urologists from 15 Latin American countries. Endourology-trained (group 1) and nontrained urologists (group 2) were analyzed. The group results were compared using the chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. SPSS version 20 for Windows was used for all analyses. RESULTS: A total of 331 urologists responded to the survey (rate of 16.55%): 221 (66.7%) in group 1 and 110 (33.2%) in group 2). In groups 1 and 2, 91.9% and 63.2% performed PCNL, respectively; 85.1% and 58.5% used preoperative tomography, respectively; 12.7% and 4.7% used preoperative nephrolitometry nomograms, respectively; 45.2% and 32.1% used endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery, respectively; 68.3% and 38.7% used multiple percutaneous tract realization, respectively; and 19.9% and 5.7% used minimally invasive PCNL, respectively (all p=0.0005). CONCLUSIONS: Statistically significant differences were observed in PCNL practice patterns of Latin American urologists with and without training in endourology. Specific training in endourology significantly influence the practice patterns of Latin American urologists.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2017.0599

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[PMID]: 29522198
[Au] Autor:Zhang X; Castanotto D; Liu X; Shemi A; Stein CA
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics, City of Hope, 1500 E. Duarte Rd., Duarte, CA 91010, USA.
[Ti] Title:Ammonium and arsenic trioxide are potent facilitators of oligonucleotide function when delivered by gymnosis.
[So] Source:Nucleic Acids Res;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1362-4962
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oligonucleotide (ON) concentrations employed for therapeutic applications vary widely, but in general are high enough to raise significant concerns for off target effects and cellular toxicity. However, lowering ON concentrations reduces the chances of a therapeutic response, since typically relatively small amounts of ON are taken up by targeted cells in tissue culture. It is therefore imperative to identify new strategies to improve the concentration dependence of ON function. In this work, we have identified ammonium ion (NH4+) as a non-toxic potent enhancer of ON activity in the nucleus and cytoplasm following delivery by gymnosis. NH4+ is a metabolite that has been extensively employed as diuretic, expectorant, for the treatment of renal calculi and in a variety of other diseases. Enhancement of function can be found in attached and suspension cells, including in difficult-to-transfect Jurkat T and CEM T cells. We have also demonstrated that NH4+ can synergistically interact with arsenic trioxide (arsenite) to further promote ON function without producing any apparent increased cellular toxicity. These small, inexpensive, widely distributed molecules could be useful not only in laboratory experiments but potentially in therapeutic ON-based combinatorial strategy for clinical applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/nar/gky150

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[PMID]: 29520419
[Au] Autor:Klein J; Netsch C; Sievert KD; Miernik A; Westphal J; Leyh H; Herrmann TRW; Olbert P; Häcker A; Bachmann A; Homberg R; Schoenthaler M; Rassweiler J; Gross AJ
[Ad] Address:Klinik für Urologie und Kinderurologie, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Prittwitzstr. 43, 89075, Ulm, Deutschland. jan-thorsten.klein@uniklinik-ulm.de.
[Ti] Title:Extrakorporale Stoßwellenlithotripsie. [Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy].
[So] Source:Urologe A;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1433-0563
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Interventional treatment of stones essentially consists of three treatment modalities. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), in addition to uterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolitholapaxy (PCNL) is an essential treatment pillar and is the only noninvasive therapy option for the treatment of urinary stones. After a long period of ESWL being the leading choice in stone treatment, the number of SWL interventions diminished in recent years in favor of the other two treatment modalities (URS and PCNL). This article describes the indications, surgical technique and management of complications of SWL.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00120-018-0611-9

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[PMID]: 29508081
[Au] Autor:Talwar R; Ziemba J
[Ad] Address:Perelman School of Medicine, Division of Urology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, 3rd Floor, West Pavilion, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. ruchika.talwar@uphs.upenn.edu.
[Ti] Title:Validated Methods of Assessing Quality of Life in Stone Disease.
[So] Source:Curr Urol Rep;19(4):25, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1534-6285
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: With the emphasis on quality standards when determining reimbursements rates, patient reported outcomes are now of particular interest to clinicians. This review addresses health-related quality of life (HRQOL) detriments that have been studied in patients with stone disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Several instruments been validated for use in stone formers. Previously, generic instruments revealed decreased HRQOL in urolithiasis patients. Recently, a disease-specific tool has been developed and has provided more insight into the specific symptoms that negatively affect the patient experience. Evidence now reveals lower HRQOL in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with calculi, as well as varying determinants after certain interventions. Disease-specific tools have been shown to be more sensitive to urologic-related complaints. These findings should be considered in management decisions to allow for patient-centered care. Further application and standardization of these assessment tools into prospective studies may have value in refining current treatment guidelines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11934-018-0776-1

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[PMID]: 29436200
[Au] Autor:Jeong JY; Kim JC; Kang DH; Lee JY
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Severance Hospital, Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Digital Videoscopic Retrograde Intrarenal Surgeries for Renal Stones: Time-to-Maximal Stone Length Ratio Analysis.
[So] Source:Yonsei Med J;59(2):303-309, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1976-2437
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To investigate 100 consecutive cases of videoscopic retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) by a single surgeon and to evaluate factors associated with stone-free status and the learning curve thereof. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed the results of videoscopic RIRS in 100 patients who underwent primary treatment for renal stones from January 2015 to August 2016. Videoscopic RIRS were performed with URF-V and URF-V2 flexible video uteroscopes (Olympus) or a Flex-Xc flexible ureterorenoscope (KARL STORZ). Non-contrast computed tomography was taken at 3 months postoperatively to confirm the absence of stones. The stone characteristics included the location, maximal stone length (MSL), stone heterogeneity index (SHI), and mean stone density (MSD). Fragmentation efficacy was calculated as operative time (min) divided by removed MSL (mm), and was evaluated in the sequential order of operations. RESULTS: The mean age of the total patient was 60.0±14.0 years. The mean MSL was 13.1±6.2 mm. The average MSD was 734.2±327.6 Hounsfield unit (HU) and the SHI was 241.0±120.0 HU. The mean operation time was 65.1±45.7 min considering each renal unit. The stone-free rate at 3 months post-surgery was 87%. The estimated cut-off of the time-to-MSL ratio below 5 min/mm was 50. Multivariate analyses indicated a lower MSD [odds ratio (OR): 0.998; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.996-0.999; p=0.047) and the last 50 cases (OR: 5.408, 95% CI: 1.337-30.426; p=0.030) as independent predictors of stone-free status after videoscopic RIRS. CONCLUSION: Low MSDs and the last 50 cases were significant predictors of stone-free rate in videoscopic RIRS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3349/ymj.2018.59.2.303


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