Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Capsicum [Words]
References found : 12679 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1268 go to page                         

  1 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29505818
[Au] Autor:Polat I; Baysal Ö; Mercati F; Gümrükcü E; Sülü G; Kitapci A; Araniti F; Carimi F
[Ad] Address:Bati Akdeniz Agricultural Research Institute, Antalya, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Characterization of Botrytis cinerea isolates collected on pepper in Southern Turkey by using molecular markers, fungicide resistance genes and virulence assay.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:151-159, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Botrytis cinerea is a polyphagous fungal pathogen causing gray mold disease. Moreover, it is one of the most destructive infections of small fruit crops such as pepper (Capsicum annnum L.). C. sativum is a species belonging to the Solanaceae family and Turkey is one of the main producers in the World. In the present work, aiming to obtain information useful for pest management, fifty B. cinerea isolates collected from Turkey and a reference isolate (B05.10) were characterized using molecular markers and fungicide resistance genes. Morphological and molecular (ITS1-ITS4) identification of B. cinerea isolates, the degree of virulence and mating types were determined. Since one or several allelic mutations in the histidine kinase (Bos1) and ß-tubulin genes generally confer the resistance to fungicides, the sequences of these target genes were investigated in the selected isolates, which allowed the identification of two different haplotypes. Mating types were also determined by PCR assays using primer specific for MAT1-1 alpha gene (MAT1-1-1) and MAT1-2 HMG (MAT1-2-1) of B. cinerea. Twenty-two out of 50 isolates (44%) were MAT1-2, while 38% were MAT1-1. Interestingly, out of whole studied samples, 9 isolates (18%) were heterokaryotic or mixed colonies. In addition, cluster and population structure analyses identified five main groups and two genetic pools, respectively, underlining a good level of variability in the analysed panel. The results highlighted the presence of remarkable genetic diversity in B. cinerea isolates collected in a crucial economical area for pepper cultivation in Turkey and the data will be beneficial in view of future gray mold disease management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29367485
[Au] Autor:Umigai N; Murakami K; Shimizu R; Takeda R; Azuma T
[Ad] Address:Riken Vitamin Co., Ltd.
[Ti] Title:Safety Evaluation and Plasma Carotenoid Accumulation in Healthy Adult Subjects after 12 Weeks of Paprika Oleoresin Supplementation.
[So] Source:J Oleo Sci;67(2):225-234, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1347-3352
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Paprika oleoresin is obtained by solvent extraction from Capsicum annuum L. fruits and contains multiple carotenoids, such as capsanthin, ß-carotene, zeaxanthin, and ß-cryptoxanthin, which are considered protective against various diseases. Herein, we investigated the effect of paprika oleoresin supplementation on plasma carotenoid accumulation and evaluated the safety of the oleoresin. We used a double-blinded, placebo-controlled comparative clinical study design and tested the effects of varying doses in healthy adult subjects. In total, 33 subjects were randomly divided into three groups to take capsules containing 0, 20, or 100 mg of paprika oleoresin daily for 12 consecutive weeks. Plasma carotenoid concentrations were measured at 0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks, and the safety of paprika oleoresin capsules was investigated using analyses of blood biochemistry, hematology, and urine contents. In these experiments, ß-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin dose-dependently accumulated in plasma within the dose range of the study over 12 consecutive weeks of paprika oleoresin supplementation. Moreover, ß-cryptoxanthin accumulated to higher levels than the other paprika oleoresin carotenoids. In contrast, capsanthin was not detected in plasma before or during the 12-week treatment period. Finally, no adverse events were associated with intake of paprika oleoresin (20 and 100 mg/day) in safety evaluations. Paprika oleoresin is a suitable source of carotenoids, especially ß-cryptoxanthin.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Capsicum/chemistry
Carotenoids/blood
Dietary Supplements
Plant Extracts/administration & dosage
Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Beta-Cryptoxanthin/blood
Dietary Supplements/adverse effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Plant Extracts/adverse effects
Random Allocation
Safety
Solvents
Time Factors
Zeaxanthins/blood
[Pt] Publication type:CLINICAL STUDY; COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Beta-Cryptoxanthin); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Solvents); 0 (Zeaxanthins); 0 (oleoresins); 36-88-4 (Carotenoids)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5650/jos.ess17155

  3 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29304162
[Au] Autor:Matsushita Y; Manabe M; Kitamura N; Shibuya I
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Adrenergic receptors inhibit TRPV1 activity in the dorsal root ganglion neurons of rats.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191032, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a polymodal receptor channel that responds to multiple types of stimuli, such as heat, acid, mechanical pressure and some vanilloids. Capsaicin is the most commonly used vanilloid to stimulate TRPV1. TRPV1 channels are expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons that extend to Aδ- and C-fibers and have a role in the transduction of noxious inputs to the skin into the electrical signals of the sensory nerve. Although noradrenergic nervous systems, including the descending antinociceptive system and the sympathetic nervous system, are known to modulate pain sensation, the functional association between TRPV1 and noradrenaline in primary sensory neurons has rarely been examined. In the present study, we examined the effects of noradrenaline on capsaicin-evoked currents in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons of the rat by the whole-cell voltage clamp method. Noradrenaline at concentrations higher than 0.1 pM significantly reduced the amplitudes of the inward capsaicin currents recorded at -60 mV holding potential. This inhibitory action was reversed by either yohimbine (an α2 antagonist, 10 nM) or propranolol (a ß antagonist, 10 nM). The α2 agonists, clonidine (1 pM) and dexmedetomidine (1 pM) inhibited capsaicin currents, and yohimbine (1 nM) reversed the effects of clonidine. The inhibitory action of noradrenaline was not seen in the neurons pretreated with pertussis toxin (100 µg/ml for 24 h) and the neurons dialyzed intracellularly with guanosine 5'- [ß-thio] diphosphate (GDPßS, 200 µM), the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (250 U/ml) or okadaic acid (1 µM). These results suggest that noradrenaline directly acts on dorsal root ganglion neurons to inhibit the activity of TRPV1 depending on the activation of α2-adrenoceptors followed by the inhibition of the adenylate cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ganglia, Spinal/metabolism
Neurons/metabolism
Receptors, Adrenergic/physiology
TRPV Cation Channels/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Capsaicin/pharmacology
Ganglia, Spinal/cytology
Ganglia, Spinal/drug effects
Male
Neurons/drug effects
Rats
Rats, Wistar
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Receptors, Adrenergic); 0 (TRPV Cation Channels); 0 (Trpv1 protein, rat); S07O44R1ZM (Capsaicin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191032

  4 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29188798
[Au] Autor:Zhang SS; Ni YH; Zhao CR; Qiao Z; Yu HX; Wang LY; Sun JY; Du C; Zhang JH; Dong LY; Wang K; Gao JJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266021, China.
[Ti] Title:Capsaicin enhances the antitumor activity of sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma cells and mouse xenograft tumors through increased ERK signaling.
[So] Source:Acta Pharmacol Sin;39(3):438-448, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1745-7254
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sorafenib, a small inhibitor of tyrosine protein kinases, is currently the standard chemotherapy drug for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although sorafenib improves the survival of HCC patients, its efficacy is not optimal and requires further improvement. Capsaicin, the major active component of chili peppers from the genus Capsicum, is not only the agonist of TRPV1 channel, but also displays antitumor activity and enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of combined sorafenib and capsaicin on HCC cells in vitro and xenograft tumors. Treatment with capsaicin alone dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of the HCC cell lines PLC/PRF/7, HuH7 and HepG2 with IC values of 137, 108 and 140.7 µmol/L, respectively. No obvious expression of TRPV1 channel was detected in the 3 HCC cell lines and TRPV1 channel blockers did not alleviate the cytotoxicity of capsaicin. By contrast, combining capsaicin and sorafenib significantly enhanced the suppression on cell proliferation, achieving a high-level synergistic effect (inhibition rates over 50%) and promoting HCC cell apoptosis. In nude mice with PLC/PRF/5 xenografts, combined administration of capsaicin and sorafenib significantly enhanced the suppression on tumor growth without apparent gross toxicity compared to either agent alone. Mechanistically, capsaicin (10-200 µmol/L) dose-dependently increased the levels of phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) in PLC/PRF/5 cells, thus leading to enhanced sorafenib sensitivity and a synergistic suppression on the tumor cells. Taken together, our results suggest that capsaicin-increased phosphorylation of ERK contributes to the enhanced antitumor activity of sorafenib, and capsaicin may be useful in improving the efficacy of sorafenib for the treatment of HCC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/aps.2017.156

  5 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29314034
[Au] Autor:Maurya VK; Gothandam KM; Ranjan V; Shakya A; Pareek S
[Ad] Address:Department of Basic and Applied Science, National Institute of Food Technology Entrepreneurship and Management, Sonepat, Haryana, India.
[Ti] Title:Effect of drying methods (microwave vacuum, freeze, hot air and sun drying) on physical, chemical and nutritional attributes of five pepper (Capsicum annuum var. annuum) cultivars.
[So] Source:J Sci Food Agric;, 2018 Jan 04.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0010
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A randomized block design experiment was performed to investigate the influence of drying on the physical, chemical and nutritional quality attributes of five prominent cultivars of India under sun drying (SD) (mean temperature 35.5 °C, average daily radiation 5.26 kW h m and mean relative humidity 73.66% RH), hot air drying (HD) at 65 °C, microwave vacuum drying (MVD) (800 W, 5 kPa) and freeze drying (FD) (-50 °C, 5 kPa). Water activity, pH, total phenolic content (TPC), ascorbic acid (AA), capsaicin, ß-carotene, color and Scoville heat unit were studied. RESULTS: TPC, AA, capsaicin content, ß-carotene, color and water activity were significantly affected by the drying method. FD was observed to be most efficient in minimizing the loss of color, capsaicin and ß-carotene. The hotness of analyzed samples decreased in the order 'Bird's Eye' > 'Sannam S4' > 'CO-4' > 'PLR-1' > 'PKM-1' among the studied cultivars, and FD > MVD > HD > SD among the drying methods. CONCLUSION: The FD method was observed to be the most efficient drying method for retaining capsaicin content over other drying methods (SD, HD, MVD), whereas MVD was found to be most efficient in minimizing the loss to nutritional attributes for all five pepper cultivars. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/jsfa.8868

  6 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29406565
[Au] Autor:Han K; Lee HY; Ro NY; Hur OS; Lee JH; Kwon JK; Kang BC
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Vegetable Breeding Research Center, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:QTL mapping and GWAS reveal candidate genes controlling capsaicinoid content in Capsicum.
[So] Source:Plant Biotechnol J;, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1467-7652
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Capsaicinoids are unique compounds produced only in peppers (Capsicum spp.). Several studies using classical quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping and genomewide association studies (GWAS) have identified QTLs controlling capsaicinoid content in peppers; however, neither the QTLs common to each population nor the candidate genes underlying them have been identified due to the limitations of each approach used. Here, we performed QTL mapping and GWAS for capsaicinoid content in peppers using two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations and one GWAS population. Whole-genome resequencing and genotyping by sequencing (GBS) were used to construct high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) maps. Five QTL regions on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 10 were commonly identified in both RIL populations over multiple locations and years. Furthermore, a total of 109 610 SNPs derived from two GBS libraries were used to analyse the GWAS population consisting of 208 C. annuum-clade accessions. A total of 69 QTL regions were identified from the GWAS, 10 of which were co-located with the QTLs identified from the two biparental populations. Within these regions, we were able to identify five candidate genes known to be involved in capsaicinoid biosynthesis. Our results demonstrate that QTL mapping and GBS-GWAS represent a powerful combined approach for the identification of loci controlling complex traits.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pbi.12894

  7 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29289264
[Au] Autor:Meng Z; Huang R
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics, First People's Hospital of YunNan Province, Kunming, YunNan, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:Topical Treatment of Degenerative Knee Osteoarthritis.
[So] Source:Am J Med Sci;355(1):6-12, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1538-2990
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This article reviews topical management strategies for degenerative osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A search of Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane library using MeSH terms including "topical," "treatment," "knee" and "osteoarthritis" was carried out. Original research and review articles on the effectiveness and safety, recommendations from international published guidelines and acceptability studies of topical preparations were included. Current topical treatments included for the management of knee OA include topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, capsaicin, salicylates and physical treatments such as hot or cold therapy. Current treatment guidelines recommend topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as an alternative and even first-line therapy for OA management, especially among elderly patients. Guidelines on other topical treatments vary, from recommendations against their use, to in favor as alternative or simultaneous therapy, especially for patients with contraindications to other analgesics. Although often well-tolerated and preferred by many patients, clinical care still lags in the adoption of topical treatments. Aspects of efficacy, safety and patient quality of life data require further research.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage
Capsaicin/administration & dosage
Osteoarthritis, Knee/drug therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards
Salicylates/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Administration, Topical
Analgesics/administration & dosage
Humans
Osteoarthritis, Knee/diagnosis
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Analgesics); 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 0 (Salicylates); S07O44R1ZM (Capsaicin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180101
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29484915
[Au] Autor:Barchenger DW; Sheu ZM; Kumar S; Lin SW; Burlakoti RR; Bosland PW
[Ad] Address:New Mexico State University, 4423, Plant and Environmental Sciences, Las Cruces, New Mexico, United States.
[Ti] Title:Race Characterization of Phytophthora root rot on Capsicum in Taiwan as a Basis for Anticipatory Resistance Breeding.
[So] Source:Phytopathology;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:0031-949X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Peppers (Capsicum sp.) are an increasingly important crop because of their use as a vegetable, spice, and food colorant. The oomycete Phytophthora capsici is one of the most devastating pathogens to pepper production worldwide, causing more than $100 million in losses annually. Developing cultivars resistant to P. capsici is challenging because of the many physiological races that exist and new races that are continuously evolving. This problem is confounded by the lack of a universal system of race characterization. As a basis to develop a global anticipatory breeding program, New Mexico Recombinant Inbred Lines (NMRILs) functioned as a host differential for Phytophthora root rot to characterize the race structure of P. capsici populations in Taiwan. Using the NMRILs, 24 new races were identified, illustrating the utility and usefulness of the NMRILs for anticipatory breeding. Virulence of P. capsici was observed to be geographically specific and in two virulence clusters. Interestingly, all but two isolates collected in 2016 were the A2 mating type, which is a shift from the predominantly A1 mating type isolates collected prior to 2008. The NMRILs host differential provides an approach for scientists to work together on a global scale when breeding for resistance as well as on a local level for regional gene deployment. Additionally, we propose that the current race numbering system, which has no biological meaning, be supplemented with the virulence phenotype, based on the susceptible NMRILs to a given isolate. This work provides insights into the population dynamics of P. capsici and interactions within the highly complex Capsicum-Phytophthora pathosystem, and offers a basis for similar research in other crops.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1094/PHYTO-08-17-0289-R

  9 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29459620
[Au] Autor:Yuan J; Chen Y; Li H; Lu J; Zhao H; Liu M; Nechitaylo GS; Glushchenko NN
[Ad] Address:Shenzhou Space Biotechnology Group, Beijing, 100190, China.
[Ti] Title:New insights into the cellular responses to iron nanoparticles in Capsicum annuum.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):3228, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this study, the anatomical and ultrastructural responses of Capsicum annuum to iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) were determined. The results showed that the bio-effects of Fe NPs on plants could be positive or negative, depending on the additive concentrations. Low concentrations of Fe NPs were found to promote plant growth. Light and electron microscope analyses showed that the Fe NPs promoted plant growth by altering the leaf organization, and increasing the chloroplast number and grana stacking, as well as regulating the development of vascular bundles. Meanwhile, it was found that the Fe NPs could be absorbed in the roots, and then transported to the central cylinder in bio-available forms, where they were translocated and utilized by the leaves and stems. In contrast, high concentrations of Fe NPs appeared to be harmful to the plants, and the majority of Fe NPs were aggregated into cell walls and transported via the apoplastic pathway in the roots, which may potentially block the transfer of iron nutrients. Taken together, the aforementioned data showed that the rational use of Fe NPs could alleviate iron deficiency, and Fe NPs could be an ideal supply for Fe ions fertilizers in agriculture.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-18055-w

  10 / 12679 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29271019
[Au] Autor:Egerer MH; Fricke EC; Rogers HS
[Ad] Address:Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailstop: ENVS, Santa Cruz, California, 95064, USA.
[Ti] Title:Seed dispersal as an ecosystem service: frugivore loss leads to decline of a socially valued plant, Capsicum frutescens.
[So] Source:Ecol Appl;, 2017 Dec 22.
[Is] ISSN:1051-0761
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Species interactions, both mutualistic and antagonistic, are widely recognized as providing important ecosystem services. Fruit-eating animals influence plant recruitment by increasing germination during gut passage and moving seeds away from conspecifics. However, relative to studies focused on the importance of frugivores for plant population maintenance, few studies target frugivores as ecosystem service providers, and frugivores are underappreciated as ecosystem service providers relative to other mutualists such as pollinators. Here, we use an accidental experiment to elucidate the role of seed dispersal by frugivores for maintaining a culturally and economically important plant, the donne' sali chili (Capsicum frutescens) in the Mariana Islands. One of the islands (Guam) has lost nearly all of its native forest birds due to an invasive snake (Boiga irregularis), whereas nearby islands have relatively intact bird populations. We hypothesized that frugivore loss would influence chili recruitment and abundance, which could have economic and cultural impacts. By using video cameras, we confirmed that birds were the primary seed dispersers. We used captive bird feeding trials to obtain gut-passed seeds to use in a seedling emergence experiment. The experiment showed that gut-passed seeds emerged sooner and at a higher proportion than seeds from whole fruits. Consistent with our findings that birds benefit chilies, we observed lower chili abundance on Guam than on islands with birds. In a survey questionnaire of island residents, the majority of residents reported an association between the wild chili and local cultural values and traditions. In addition, we identified a thriving market for chili products, suggesting benefits of wild chilies to people in the Marianas both as consumers and producers. Our study therefore documents seed dispersal as both a cultural and a supporting ecosystem service. We provide a comprehensive case study on how seed-dispersed plants decline in the absence of their disperser, and how to apply mixed-methods in ecosystem service assessments. Furthermore, we suggest that scientists and resource managers may utilize fruit-frugivore mutualisms concerning socially valuable plants to gather support for frugivore and forest conservation efforts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/eap.1667


page 1 of 1268 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information