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[PMID]: 29433390
[Au] Autor:Hua S; Zhang Y; Liu J; Dong L; Huang J; Lin D; Fu X
[Ad] Address:* School of Pharmacy, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750004, P. R. China.
[Ti] Title:Ethnomedicine, Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Smilax glabra: An Important Traditional Chinese Medicine.
[So] Source:Am J Chin Med;:1-37, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:0192-415X
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Smilax glabra (SG) Roxb., a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, has been extensively used worldwide for its marked pharmacological activities for treating syphilitic poisoned sores, limb hypertonicity, morbid leucorrhea, eczema pruritus, strangury due to heat, carbuncle toxin, and many other human ailments. Approximately 200 chemical compounds have been isolated from SG Roxb., and the major components have been determined to be flavonoids and flavonoid glycosides, phenolic acids, and steroids. Among these active compounds, the effects of astilbin, which is used as a quality control marker to determine the quality of SG Roxb., have been widely investigated. Based on in vivo and in vitro studies, the primary active components of SG Roxb. possess various pharmacological activities, such as cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects, anti-oxidant, hepatoprotective, antiviral, antibacterial, and cardiovascular system protective activities. However, an extensive study to determine the relationship between the chemical compositions and pharmacological effects of SG Roxb. has not been conducted and is worth of our study. Improving the means of utilizing the effects of SG is crucial. The present paper reviews the ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and pharmacology of SG Roxb. and assesses its ethnopharmacological use in order to explore its therapeutic potential for future research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1142/S0192415X18500143

  2 / 336 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28448262
[Au] Autor:Ahmad H; Siddiqui SS
[Ad] Address:Dow Medical College & Civil Hospital Karachi Dow University of Health Sciences Baba-e-Urdu Road, Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:An Unusually Large Carbuncle of the Temporofacial Region Demonstrating Remarkable Post-debridement Wound Healing Process: A Case Report.
[So] Source:Wounds;29(4):92-95, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1943-2704
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Skin carbuncles are debilitating skin infections commonly seen in elderly patients with diabetes. These infections develop when a cluster of adjacent furuncles coalesce to form one inflammatory mass. While they commonly occur on the nape of the neck and back, rarer sites involving the face and head have been noted. Management of these rare sites is urgent because of the potential intracranial complications and the surgical outcome is often unsatisfactory due to associated facial scarring. Intraoral drainage is advocated to avoid this; however, when the carbuncle involves a larger area, debridement from the exterior is necessary. The resultant soft-tissue defect requires a skin graft or a flap for coverage, but this may still lead to an unsatisfactory cosmetic outcome. The authors report a case of a carbuncle involving an extensive area over the right temporofacial region, including its management and the remarkable post-debridement cosmetic outcome despite avoidance of plastic surgery techniques due to the patient's high risk associated with anesthesia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carbuncle/pathology
Debridement/methods
Face/pathology
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods
Wound Healing/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage
Carbuncle/psychology
Carbuncle/therapy
Cicatrix/pathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy
Drainage
Esthetics
Headache Disorders/etiology
Headache Disorders/physiopathology
Headache Disorders/therapy
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications
Kidney Failure, Chronic/physiopathology
Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Satisfaction
Sepsis/etiology
Sepsis/physiopathology
Sepsis/therapy
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180103
[Lr] Last revision date:180103
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170428
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28912837
[Au] Autor:Alfouzan W; Bulach D; Izumiya H; AlBassam K; Sheikh S; Alrubai'aan N; Albert MJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Jabriya, Kuwait.
[Ti] Title:Carbuncle due to Enteritidis: a novel presentation.
[So] Source:Gut Pathog;9:51, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1757-4749
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Enteritidis causes intestinal and extra-intestinal infections, but rarely cutaneous infections. It has never been reported to cause carbuncle (a collection of interconnected furuncles with multiple pustular openings). We report a case of carbuncle due to Enteritidis. CASE PRESENTATION: An adult Bangladeshi patient with type 2 diabetes presented with a carbuncle on the left-side of his neck. A pure culture of Enteritidis was grown from the pus of the carbuncle. The patient was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin to which the isolate was susceptible. Whole genome sequencing of the strain showed that it possessed three additional virulence genes- (for plasmid-encoded fimbriae), (for salmonella plasmid virulence), (for resistance to complement killing) -responsible for systemic infections that were absent in the genome of a reference Enteritidis strain. In phylogenetic analysis, the strain clustered with other Enteritidis strains from different parts of the world. CONCLUSIONS: A weakened immune system of the patient due to diabetes mellitus and the additional virulence genes of the isolate may have contributed to the unusual presentation of carbuncle. The possibility of Enteritidis to cause carbuncle should be considered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170917
[Lr] Last revision date:170917
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13099-017-0200-2

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[PMID]: 28665146
[Au] Autor:Kim H; Yoo KH; Zheng Z; Cho SB
[Ad] Address:a Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology Research Center, International St. Mary's Hospital , Catholic Kwandong University, College of Medicine , Incheon , Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Pressure- and dose-controlled transcutaneous pneumatic injection of hypertonic glucose solution for the treatment of atrophic skin disorders.
[So] Source:J Cosmet Laser Ther;19(8):479-484, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4180
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Needleless transcutaneous pneumatic injections (TPIs) are a minimally invasive way to deliver the solution into the skin for therapeutic purposes. The suggested action mechanisms of TPI therapy include mechanical stimulation, immediate tissue shrinkage and late wound healing. METHODS: Thirteen Korean patients were treated with TPI for atrophic skin disorders, including acne scars, striae albae, post-furuncle, or carbuncle scars, and horizontal wrinkles with lipoatrophy. At each TPI treatment session, a single pass was made along with the atrophic skin lesions without overlapping. Thereafter, two dermatologists objectively evaluated the clinical improvement in the lesions in the photographs via the global aesthetic improvement scale (GAIS). RESULTS: One month after the final treatment, the overall mean GAIS score was 2.3 ± 0.8. Six of the 13 (46.2%) patients exhibited clinical improvement of grade 3, five (38.5%) patients grade 2 and two (15.4%) patients grade 1. The overall mean subjective satisfaction score with the TPI treatment was 2.3 ± 0.9. Six of the 13 (46.2%) patients achieved subjective satisfaction of grade 3, six (46.2%) patients grade 2 and one (7.7%) patient grade 0. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrated that the TPI treatment is effective and safe for treating atrophic skin disorders of varying causes in Korean patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/14764172.2017.1343950

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[PMID]: 28630227
[Au] Autor:Venkatesan R; Baskaran R; Asirvatham AR; Mahadevan S
[Ad] Address:Sri Ramachandra University Medical College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:'Carbuncle in diabetes': a problem even today!
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2017, 2017 Jun 19.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170620
[Lr] Last revision date:170620
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 336 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28595500
[Au] Autor:He X; Luan F; Zhao Z; Ning N; Li M; Jin L; Chang Y; Zhang Q; Wu N; Huang L
[Ad] Address:* Honghui Hospital, Xi'an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi'an 710054, P. R. China.
[Ti] Title:The Genus Patrinia: A Review of Traditional Uses, Phytochemical and Pharmacological Studies.
[So] Source:Am J Chin Med;45(4):637-666, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0192-415X
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of the present review is to comprehensively outline the botanical description, traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Patrinia, and to discuss possible trends for the further study of medicinal plants from the genus Patrinia. The genus Patrinia plays an important role in Asian medicine for the treatment of erysipelas, conjunctival congestion with swelling and pain, peri-appendicular abscesses, lung carbuncle, dysentery, leucorrhea, and postpartum disease. More than 210 chemical constituents have been isolated and identified from Patrinia plants, especially P. scabiosaefolia Fisch., P. scabra Bunge, P. villosa Juss., P. heterophylla Bunge and P. rupestris(Pall.) Juss[Formula: see text] Of these compounds, triterpenoids and saponins, iridoids, flavonoids, and lignans are the major or active constituents. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that some monomer compounds and crude extracts from the genus Patrinia possess wide pharmacological activities, including antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral effects. In addition, they have been shown to have valuable and positive effects on the immune and nervous system in experimental animals. There are also some reports on the clinical uses and toxicity of these species. However, few reports have been published concerning the material identification or quality control of Patrinia species, and the clinical uses and toxic effects of these plants are relatively sparse. More attention must be given to these issues.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic
Patrinia/chemistry
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abscess/drug therapy
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antiviral Agents
Dysentery/drug therapy
Erysipelas/drug therapy
Flavonoids/isolation & purification
Humans
Iridoids/isolation & purification
Lignans/isolation & purification
Patrinia/toxicity
Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
Plant Extracts/toxicity
Saponins/isolation & purification
Triterpenes/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic); 0 (Antiviral Agents); 0 (Flavonoids); 0 (Iridoids); 0 (Lignans); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Saponins); 0 (Triterpenes)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170919
[Lr] Last revision date:170919
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170610
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1142/S0192415X17500379

  7 / 336 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28494177
[Au] Autor:Hazari A; K N S; K Rao K; G Maiya A
[Ad] Address:a Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Manipal University , Manipal , India.
[Ti] Title:Influence of low-level laser on pain and inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic dermopathy - A case report.
[So] Source:J Cosmet Laser Ther;19(6):360-363, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4180
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Numerous skin lesions have been commonly observed in individuals with diabetes mellitus. The common skin manifestations of diabetes mellitus are erythrasma, xanthomatosis, xanthelasma, phycomycetes and cutaneous infections like furuncolosis, candidiasis, carbuncle, dermatophytosis, etc. Diabetic dermopathy is the most common skin lesion found in patients with diabetes. It is typically seen in men aged above 50 years. In low-level laser therapy (LLLT), the entire lower limb was illuminated with the frequency of 20 Hz and wavelength of 830 nm for 9 min, and the treatment was divided into four parts. With the continued sessions of LLLT, the skin manifestations and neuropathy conditions improved drastically. On the 21st day, the skin colour was found to be normal. Also, there were significant changes in clinical findings for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. LLLT with specific exercises can promote healing of skin manifestations in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It can be used as an effective treatment modality for treating diabetic dermopathy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170901
[Lr] Last revision date:170901
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/14764172.2017.1326611

  8 / 336 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28412984
[Au] Autor:Ngui LX; Wong LS; Shashi G; Abu Bakar MN
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery,Sibu Hospital,Sarawak,Malaysia.
[Ti] Title:Facial carbuncle - a new method of conservative surgical management plus irrigation with antibiotic-containing solution.
[So] Source:J Laryngol Otol;131(9):830-833, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1748-5460
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This paper reports on a non-conventional method for the management of facial carbuncles, highlighting its superiority over conventional surgical treatment in terms of cosmetic outcome and shorter duration of wound healing. BACKGROUND: The mainstay of treatment for carbuncles involves the early administration of antibiotics in combination with surgical intervention. The conventional saucerisation, or incision and drainage, under normal circumstances results in moderate to large wounds, which may need secondary surgery such as skin grafting, resulting in a longer duration of wound healing and jeopardising cosmetic outcome. CASE REPORTS: The reported three cases presented with extensive carbuncles over the chin, face and lips region. In addition to early commencement of intravenous antibiotics, the pus was drained, with minimal incision and conservative wound debridement, with the aim of maximal skin conservation. This was followed by thrice-daily irrigation with antibiotic-containing solution for a minimum of 2 consecutive days. The wounds healed within two to four weeks, without major cosmetic compromise. CONCLUSION: The new method showed superior cosmetic outcomes, with a shorter duration of wound healing. Conservative surgical management can be performed under regional anaesthesia, which may reduce morbidity and mortality; patients with facial carbuncles often have higher risks with general anaesthesia.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Carbuncle/therapy
Debridement/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Combined Modality Therapy
Conservative Treatment
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Treatment Outcome
Wound Healing
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170915
[Lr] Last revision date:170915
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170418
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0022215117000834

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[PMID]: 27840258
[Au] Autor:Ma Q; Wei R; Wang Z; Liu W; Sang Z; Li Y; Huang H
[Ad] Address:College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473061, China. Electronic address: maqinge2006@163.com.
[Ti] Title:Bioactive alkaloids from the aerial parts of Houttuynia cordata.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;195:166-172, 2017 Jan 04.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Houttuynia cordata is an important traditional Chinese medicine used in heat-clearing and detoxifying, swelling and discharging pus, promoting diuresis and relieving stranguria which recorded in Pharmacopoeia of the people's Republic of China (2015 Edition). H. cordata has been recorded in the book Bencaogangmu which was written by Shizhen Li for the treatment of pyretic toxicity, carbuncle swelling, haemorrhoids, and rectocele diseases. AIM OF THE STUDY: Phytochemical investigation of the aerial parts of H. cordata and evaluation of their PTP1B inhibitory activities and hepatoprotective activities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The dried aerial parts of H. cordata were fractionated by liquid-liquid extraction to obtain CHCl , ethyl acetate, and n-butanolic fractions. The CHCl fraction was confirmed active fraction by the bioactivity-guided investigation, which was isolated and purified by chromatographing over silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, MPLC, and preparative HPLC. The chemical structures of the purified compounds were identified by their spectroscopic data and references. RESULTS: Eight new compounds (1-8), together with fourteen known compounds (9-22) were isolated from the aerial parts of H. cordata. The known compounds (9-22) were obtained from this plant for the first time. Among them, some compounds exhibited moderate bioactivities. CONCLUSION: Compounds (1-8) were identified as new alkaloids, and the known alkaloids (9-22) were isolated from this plant for the first time. Compounds 1, 4, 14, and 19 showed significant PTP1B inhibitory activities with IC values of 1.254, 2.016, 2.672, and 1.862µm, respectively. Compounds 1, 3, 6, 11, 17, and 20 (10µm) exhibited moderate hepatoprotective activities against D-galactosamine-induced WB-F344 cells damage.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alkaloids/pharmacology
Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/prevention & control
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology
Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology
Hepatocytes/drug effects
Houttuynia/chemistry
Liver/drug effects
Plant Components, Aerial/chemistry
Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 1/antagonists & inhibitors
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alkaloids/chemistry
Alkaloids/isolation & purification
Cell Line
Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/etiology
Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/pathology
Cytoprotection
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/chemistry
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/isolation & purification
Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry
Enzyme Inhibitors/isolation & purification
Galactosamine/toxicity
Hepatocytes/pathology
Liver/pathology
Molecular Structure
Phytotherapy
Plants, Medicinal
Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 1/metabolism
Structure-Activity Relationship
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Alkaloids); 0 (Drugs, Chinese Herbal); 0 (Enzyme Inhibitors); 0 (plant extract, Houttuynia cordata); 7535-00-4 (Galactosamine); EC 3.1.3.48 (PTPN1 protein, human); EC 3.1.3.48 (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 1)
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170703
[Lr] Last revision date:170703
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161115
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28911593
[Au] Autor:Wang Q; Jin J; Dai N; Han N; Han J; Bao B
[Ad] Address:College of Traditional Mongolian Medicine, Inner Mongolia University for Nationalities, Tongliao 028000, China. Electronic address: wqh693@163.com.
[Ti] Title:Anti-inflammatory effects, nuclear magnetic resonance identification, and high-performance liquid chromatography isolation of the total flavonoids from Artemisia frigida.
[So] Source:J Food Drug Anal;24(2):385-391, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1021-9498
[Cp] Country of publication:China (Republic : 1949- )
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aerial parts of Artemisia frigida Willd. are used to treat joint swelling, renal heat, abnormal menstruation, and sore carbuncle. The anti-inflammatory effects of A. frigida have been well-known in folk medicine, suggesting that components extracted from A. frigida could potentially treat inflammatory disease. With the aim of discovering bioactive compounds, in this study, we extracted total flavonoids from the aerial parts of A. frigida and investigated their anti-inflammatory effects against inflammation induced by carrageenan and egg albumin in rats. At the doses studied, total flavonoids (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 400 mg/kg) and some isolated compounds (30 mg/kg) showed significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects. According to the high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the total flavonoids from A. frigida, there are five major compounds, namely, 5-hydroxy-3',4'-dimethoxy-7-O-ß-d-glucuronide (F1), 5-hydroxy-3',4',5'-trimethoxy-7-O-ß-d-glucuronide (F2), 5,7,3'-trihydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone (F3), 5,3'-dihydroxy-6,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (F4), and 5,3'-dihydroxy-3,6,7,4'-tetramethoxyflavone (F5), which may explain the anti-inflammatory activity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170915
[Lr] Last revision date:170915
[St] Status:In-Process


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