Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Cardio-Renal and Syndrome [Words]
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[PMID]: 28460776
[Au] Autor:Di Lullo L; Bellasi A; Barbera V; Russo D; Russo L; Di Iorio B; Cozzolino M; Ronco C
[Ad] Address:Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, L. Parodi - Delfino Hospital, Colleferro Rome, Italy. Electronic address: dilulloluca69@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Pathophysiology of the cardio-renal syndromes types 1-5: An uptodate.
[So] Source:Indian Heart J;69(2):255-265, 2017 Mar - Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0019-4832
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:According to the recent definition proposed by the Consensus conference on Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative Group, the term cardio-renal syndrome (CRS) has been used to define different clinical conditions in which heart and kidney dysfunction overlap. Type 1 CRS (acute cardio- renal syndrome) is characterized by acute worsening of cardiac function leading to AKI (5, 6) in the setting of active cardiac disease such as ADHF, while type - 2 CRS occurs in a setting of chronic heart disease. Type 3 CRS is closely link to acute kidney injury (AKI), while type 4 represent cardiovascular involvement in chronic kidney disese (CKD) patients. Type 5 CRS represent cardiac and renal involvement in several diseases such as sepsis, hepato - renal syndrome and immune - mediated diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardio-Renal Syndrome/physiopathology
Ventricular Function/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Disease Progression
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 621 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29315332
[Au] Autor:Vallabhajosyula S; Sakhuja A; Geske JB; Kumar M; Kashyap R; Kashani K; Jentzer JC
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Clinical profile and outcomes of acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 in sepsis: An eight-year cohort study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190965, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To evaluate the clinical features and outcomes of acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. METHODS: Historical cohort study of all adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the intensive care units (ICU) at Mayo Clinic Rochester from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2014. Patients with prior renal or cardiac dysfunction were excluded. Patients were divided into groups with and without cardiorenal syndrome type-5. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) was defined by both serum creatinine and urine output criteria of the AKI Network and the cardiac injury was determined by troponin-T levels. Outcomes included in-hospital mortality, ICU and hospital length of stay, and one-year survival. RESULTS: Of 602 patients meeting the study inclusion criteria, 430 (71.4%) met criteria for acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5. Patients with cardiorenal syndrome type-5 had higher severity of illness, greater vasopressor and mechanical ventilation use. Cardiorenal syndrome type-5 was associated higher unadjusted in-hospital mortality, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, and lower one-year survival. When adjusted for age, gender, severity of illness and mechanical ventilation, cardiorenal syndrome type-5 was independently associated with 1.7-times greater odds of in-hospital mortality (p = .03), but did not predict one-year survival (p = .06) compared to patients without cardiorenal syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: In sepsis, acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 is associated with worse in-hospital mortality compared to patients without cardiorenal syndrome.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardio-Renal Syndrome/pathology
Sepsis/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Cardio-Renal Syndrome/complications
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Respiration, Artificial
Sepsis/physiopathology
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180110
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190965

  3 / 621 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28747177
[Au] Autor:Ortega-Hernández J; Springall R; Sánchez-Muñoz F; Arana-Martinez JC; González-Pacheco H; Bojalil R
[Ad] Address:Department of Immunology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Juan Badiano 1, Sección XVI, Tlalpan, 14080, Mexico City, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Acute coronary syndrome and acute kidney injury: role of inflammation in worsening renal function.
[So] Source:BMC Cardiovasc Disord;17(1):202, 2017 07 26.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2261
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), a common complication of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is associated with higher mortality and longer hospital stays. The role of cytokines and other mediators is unknown in AKI induced by an ACS (ACS-AKI), leading to several unanswered questions. The worsening of renal function is usually seen as a dichotomous phenomenon instead of a dynamic change, so evaluating changes of the renal function in time may provide valuable information in the ACS-AKI setting. The aim of this study was to explore inflammatory factors associated to de novo kidney injury induced by de novo cardiac injury secondary to ACS. METHODS: One hundred four consecutive patients with ACS were initially included on the time of admission to the Coronary Unit of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología in Mexico City, from February to May 2016, before any invasive procedure, imaging study, diuretic or anti-platelet therapy. White blood count, hemoglobin, NT-ProBNP, troponin I, C-reactive protein, albumin, glucose, Na , K , blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, creatinine (Cr), endothelin-1 (ET-1), leukotriene-B4, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, resolvin-D1 (RvD1), lipoxin-A4 (LXA4), interleukin-1ß, -6, -8, and -10 were measured. We finally enrolled 78 patients, and subsequently we identified 15 patients with ACS-AKI. Correlations were obtained by a Spearman rank test. Low-rank regression, splines regressions, and also protein-protein/chemical interactions and pathways analyses networks were performed. RESULTS: Positive correlations of ΔCr were found with BUN, admission Cr, GRACE score, IL-1ß, IL-6, NT-ProBNP and age, and negative correlations with systolic blood pressure, mean-BP, diastolic-BP and LxA4. In the regression analyses IL-10 and RvD1 had positive non-linear associations with ΔCr. ET-1 had also a positive association. Significant non-linear associations were seen with NT-proBNP, admission Cr, BUN, Na , K , WBC, age, body mass index, GRACE, SBP, mean-BP and Hb. CONCLUSION: Inflammation and its components play an important role in the worsening of renal function in ACS. IL-10, ET-1, IL-1ß, TnI, RvD1 and LxA4 represent mediators that might be associated with ACS-AKI. IL-6, ET-1, NT-ProBNP might represent crossroads for several physiopathological pathways involved in "de novo cardiac injury leading to de novo kidney injury".
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acute Coronary Syndrome/complications
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology
Cardio-Renal Syndrome/etiology
Cytokines/blood
Inflammation Mediators/blood
Inflammation/etiology
Kidney/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Coronary Syndrome/blood
Acute Coronary Syndrome/diagnosis
Acute Kidney Injury/blood
Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis
Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology
Aged
Biomarkers/blood
Cardio-Renal Syndrome/blood
Cardio-Renal Syndrome/diagnosis
Cardio-Renal Syndrome/physiopathology
Female
Humans
Inflammation/blood
Inflammation/diagnosis
Inflammation/physiopathology
Male
Mexico
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Protein Interaction Maps
Risk Factors
Signal Transduction
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Cytokines); 0 (Inflammation Mediators)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12872-017-0640-0

  4 / 621 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29429026
[Au] Autor:Linz D; Hohl M; Elliott AD; Lau DH; Mahfoud F; Esler MD; Sanders P; Böhm M
[Ad] Address:Centre for Heart Rhythm Disorders (CHRD), South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), University of Adelaide and Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. dominik.linz@adelaide.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Modulation of renal sympathetic innervation: recent insights beyond blood pressure control.
[So] Source:Clin Auton Res;, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1619-1560
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Renal afferent and efferent sympathetic nerves are involved in the regulation of blood pressure and have a pathophysiological role in hypertension. Additionally, several conditions that frequently coexist with hypertension, such as heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, atrial fibrillation, renal dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome, demonstrate enhanced sympathetic activity. Renal denervation (RDN) is an approach to reduce renal and whole body sympathetic activation. Experimental models indicate that RDN has the potential to lower blood pressure and prevent cardio-renal remodeling in chronic diseases associated with enhanced sympathetic activation. Studies have shown that RDN can reduce blood pressure in drug-naïve hypertensive patients and in hypertensive patients under drug treatment. Beyond its effects on blood pressure, sympathetic modulation by RDN has been shown to have profound effects on cardiac electrophysiology and cardiac arrhythmogenesis. RDN can display anti-arrhythmic effects in a variety of animal models for atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias. The first non-randomized studies demonstrate that RDN may promote the maintenance of sinus rhythm following catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation. Registry data point towards a beneficial effect of RDN to prevent ventricular arrhythmias in patients with heart failure and electrical storm. Further large randomized placebo-controlled trials are needed to confirm the antihypertensive and anti-arrhythmic effects of RDN. Here, we will review the current literature on anti-arrhythmic effects of RDN with the focus on atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias. We will discuss new insights from preclinical and clinical mechanistic studies and possible clinical implications of RDN.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180211
[Lr] Last revision date:180211
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10286-018-0508-0

  5 / 621 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29393602
[Au] Autor:Lobzhanidze G
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia - giorgi.lobzhanidze@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Association between left ventricular ejection fraction and renal impairment in patients with Cardio-Renal Syndrome type 2.
[So] Source:Minerva Cardioangiol;, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1827-1618
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180202
[Lr] Last revision date:180202
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.23736/S0026-4725.18.04580-2

  6 / 621 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29393129
[Au] Autor:Ostermann M; Cerdá J
[Ti] Title:The Burden of Acute Kidney Injury and Related Financial Issues.
[So] Source:Contrib Nephrol;193:100-112, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1662-2782
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most common complications in acutely ill patients. The epidemiology, clinical presentation, and outcome vary between patients and countries. SUMMARY: Patients with AKI often exhibit multiple organ dysfunction that is caused, in part, by marked cross-talk between the kidney and other organs and tissues. These deleterious interactions arise, at least in part, from systemic inflammatory changes, an increased cytokine load, increases in leukocyte trafficking and activation of neurohormonal processes. Typical short-term complications of AKI include acute lung injury, liver dysfunction, cardio-renal syndrome, brain dysfunction, systemic inflammation, and increased mortality. Survivors of AKI are at risk of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular morbidity, strokes, infections, bone fractures and increased mortality. AKI is associated with high healthcare costs as a result of a longer stay in hospital, increased costs for investigations and interventions and the development of long-term complications including dialysis dependence, chronic comorbidities and re-hospitalisations. The outcomes and financial implications are worse in low-income countries compared to high-income countries. Key Message: AKI is common among hospitalised patients and associated with serious short- and long-term complications, increased mortality, and high health care costs. There are important differences in epidemiology and outcomes between low- and high-income countries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180202
[Lr] Last revision date:180202
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1159/000484967

  7 / 621 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29383636
[Au] Autor:Di Nicolò P
[Ad] Address:Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, "S. Maria della Scaletta" Hospital, Via Montericco n. 4, 40026, Imola, BO, Italy. p.dinicolo@hotmail.it.
[Ti] Title:The dark side of the kidney in cardio-renal syndrome: renal venous hypertension and congestive kidney failure.
[So] Source:Heart Fail Rev;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1573-7322
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Renal involvement in some forms of acute or chronic diseases, such as heart failure or sepsis, presents with a complex pathophysiological basis that is not always clearly distinguishable. In these clinical settings, kidney failure is traditionally and almost exclusively attributed to renal hypoperfusion and it is commonly accepted that causal elements are pre-renal, such as a reduction in the ejection fraction or absolute or relative hypovolemia acting directly on oxygen transport mechanisms and renal autoregulation systems, causing a reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Nevertheless, the concept emerging from accumulating clinical and experimental evidence is that in complex clinical pictures, kidney failure is strongly linked to the hemodynamic alterations occurring in the renal venous micro and macrocirculation. Accordingly, the transmission of the increased venous pressure to the renal venous compartment and the consequent increasing renal afterload has a pivotal role in determining and sustaining the kidney damage. The aim of this review was to clarify the physiopathological aspects of the link between worsening renal function and renal venous hypertension, analyzing the prognostic and therapeutic implications of the so-called congestive kidney failure in cardio-renal syndrome and in other clinical contexts of its possible onset.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180131
[Lr] Last revision date:180131
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10741-018-9673-4

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[PMID]: 29361428
[Au] Autor:Ruilope LM; Nunes Filho ACB; Nadruz W; Rodríguez Rosales FF; Verdejo-Paris J
[Ad] Address:"Cátedra UAM de Epidemiología y Control del Riesgo Cardiovascular", Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain; Hypertension Unit, Institute of Research i+12: Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk Group, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Heal
[Ti] Title:Obesity and hypertension in Latin America: Current perspectives.
[So] Source:Hipertens Riesgo Vasc;, 2018 Jan 17.
[Is] ISSN:1989-4805
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the countries of Central America, South America and the Caribbean, there has been a dramatic rise in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors in the last few decades. Epidemiological evidence highlights a consistent correlation between obesity and hypertension, and the presence of obesity predisposes an individual to a greater risk of hypertension although the mechanisms remain unclear. Obesity and hypertension are two key drivers of the cardio-renal disease continuum, and patients with uncontrolled cardiovascular risk in their mid-life will likely have an increased risk of clinical cardiovascular and renal outcomes in old age. This article summarizes the current status for the prevalence and consequences of obesity and hypertension in Latin America, with the aim of initiating a call to action to all stakeholders for greater implementation of primary prevention strategies, particularly in the young.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 621 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29261470
[Au] Autor:Pursnani A; Prasad PV
[Ad] Address:Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine NorthShore University HealthSystem Evanston, Ill.
[Ti] Title:Science to Practice: Can Functional MR Imaging Be Useful in the Evaluation of Cardiorenal Syndrome?
[So] Source:Radiology;286(1):1-3, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1527-1315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the kidneys has gained interest recently, especially in the detection of early changes in acute kidney injury or to predict progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The application of these methods to cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is novel. CRS is widely accepted as a complex clinical problem routinely faced by clinicians. In this issue, Chang et al ( 1 ) present their preliminary experience applying blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MR imaging to the kidneys in mice with experimental myocardial infarction. They showed that R2* in the kidney increases after induced myocardial infarction and that the response was higher in animals with larger infarcts and over time. The authors also for the first time correlated the BOLD MR imaging findings against hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression, an independent marker of renal hypoxia. In addition, they showed evidence for renal injury by using a kidney injury marker, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1). The results of their study support the use of renal BOLD MR imaging in subjects with heart failure, in whom the risk of subsequent renal ischemia and/or hypoxia is known to exist. These results, along with those of other recent reports ( 2 ), suggest that functional imaging methods could play a key role in evaluating changes in both the primary and secondary organs involved in complex disease processes such as CRS. Availability of such methods could facilitate translation to the clinic and improve the mechanistic understanding of the complicated and interrelated pathophysiology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardio-Renal Syndrome/diagnostic imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biomarkers/analysis
Heart Failure/diagnostic imaging
Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1/metabolism
Humans
Mice
Oxygen/blood
Oxygen/metabolism
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/diagnostic imaging
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (HAVCR1 protein, human); 0 (Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1); S88TT14065 (Oxygen)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180108
[Lr] Last revision date:180108
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1148/radiol.2017171957

  10 / 621 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29230260
[Au] Autor:Bodian M; Thiaw A; Sarr SA; Babaka K; Aw F; Ngaïde AA; Ndiaye MB; Kane A; Jobe M; Mbaye A; Diao M; Sarr M; Ba SA
[Ad] Address:Service de Cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Aristide Le Dantec, Dakar, Sénégal.
[Ti] Title:Syndrome cardio-rénal: aspects épidémiologiques, à propos de 36 cas dans un service de cardiologie de Dakar. [Epidemiological features of cardiorenal syndrome: a study of 36 cases in the Cardiology Department in Dakar].
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:58, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is a pathophysiologic disorder of the heart and the kidneys whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other. In Africa, particularly in Senegal, the incidence of cardiorenal syndrome is not accurately known. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of CRS in the Cardiology Department. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study including all patients with heart failure associated with alteration of renal function, hospitalized in the Cardiology Department between April 2010 and April 2011. Data were analyzed with the statistical software Epi-Info 3.5.3. Results: 36 patients were included in the study. The prevalence rate was 3.7% with male predominance (sex-ratio 1.77) and an average age of 56.9 years [30-92]. Patients' medical history was dominated by high blood pressure (52.77%) and diabetes (19.4%). The main etiologies were hypertensive cardiomyopathy (39%) and coronary heart disease (19.44%). The symptomatology was dominated by dyspnoea (69.4%) and edema (50%). 17 patients had anemia. The mean measured clearance (MDRD) was 46 ml/min. Doppler echocardiography showed mainly kinetic disorders (89.3%) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (71%). The three renal ultrasound examinations were normal. Six deaths (16.7%) were recorded. Conclusion: Cardiorenal syndrome is a reality and marks a turning point in the evolution of heart and kidney diseases. In Senegal, its prevalence in the Cardiology Department is low. Prospective multicentric studies should be conducted in order to better evaluate this syndrome in Senegal.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardio-Renal Syndrome/epidemiology
Heart Failure/epidemiology
Kidney Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia/epidemiology
Cardio-Renal Syndrome/physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure/physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension/epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Senegal/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171222
[Lr] Last revision date:171222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.58.10257


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