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[PMID]: 25467097
[Au] Autor:Forny DN; Ferrante SM; Silveira VG; Siviero I; Chagas VL; Méio IB
[Ad] Address:Federal University of Rio de Janeiro....
[Ti] Title:Choledochal cyst in childhood: review of 30 cases.
[So] Source:Rev Col Bras Cir;41(5):331-5, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1809-4546
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng; por
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To analyze and discuss the clinical data, diagnosis and treatment of a number of patients with cystic dilatation of the common bile duct of a Brazilian pediatric hospital. METHODS: We analyzed 30 patients treated at the Martagão Gesteira Institute of Pediatrics and Child Care of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro for 23 years ,with statistical analysis of epidemiological data, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and postoperative outcome. RESULTS: We observed a marked female predominance (73.4% of cases), the diagnosis being made in the first decade of life in 90% of patients. The most prevalent clinical manifestation was jaundice (70% of cases) and the classic triad of choledochal cyst was not observed. Abdominal ultrasound was the first imaging examination performed, with a sensitivity of 56.6%, with diagnostic definition in 17 children. Two patients (6.6%) had prenatal diagnosis. All patients underwent surgical treatment, cyst resection with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy being performed in 80% of cases. The incidence of postoperative complications was 13.3% and the mortality rate was 6.6%, ie two patients were diagnosed with Caroli's disease. CONCLUSION: The non-observance of the classic triad of choledochal cyst suggests that its incidence is lower than that reported in the medical literature. The surgical treatment of choledochal cysts, with resection and bilioenteric anastomosis, is safe even for small children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 1204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24870623
[Au] Autor:Cheung VT; Joshi D; Amin Z; Webster GJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, University College Hospital, London, UK....
[Ti] Title:Fever and right upper quadrant pain in a 24-year-old male. Caroli disease and splenomegaly suggesting portal hypertension.
[So] Source:Gut;63(10):1626, 1625, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1468-3288
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Abdominal Pain/diagnosis
Caroli Disease/diagnosis
Fever/diagnosis
Hypertension, Portal/diagnosis
Splenomegaly/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cholangiopancreatography, Magnetic Resonance
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Male
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140903
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/gutjnl-2014-306987

  3 / 1204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24286473
[Au] Autor:Di Mauro A; Caroli Casavola V; Favia Guarnieri G; Calderoni G; Cicinelli E; Laforgia N
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Science and Human Oncology, Neonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, University of Bari, "Aldo Moro", P,zza Giulio Cesare, 11, 70125 Bari, Italy. dimauroantonio@msn.com.
[Ti] Title:Antenatal and postnatal combined therapy for autoantibody-related congenital atrioventricular block.
[So] Source:BMC Pregnancy Childbirth;13:220, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2393
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Autoantibody-related congenital heart block (CHB) is an autoimmune condition in which trans placental passage of maternal autoantibodies cause damage to the developing heart conduction system of the foetus. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of an Italian 31-year-old woman, in a good clinical status, referred to our Centre at 26 weeks of her first pregnancy, because of foetal bradycardia, found during routine foetal ultrasonography. Foetal echocardiography revealed a 3rd degree CHB, without any anatomical defects. Despite the mother was asymptomatic for autoimmune disease, anti-Ro/La were searched for, because of the hypothesis of autoantibody-related CHB. High title of maternal anti-Ro/SSA antibodies was found and diagnosis of an autoantibody-related CHB was made. A combination treatment protocol of the mother was started with oral betamethasone, plasmapheresis and IVIG. An emergency C-section was performed at 32 + 3 weeks of gestation because of a non-reassuring cardiotocography pattern. A male newborn (BW 1515 g, NGA, Apgar 8-10) was treated since birth with high-flow O2 for mild RDS. IVIG administration was started at one week, and then every two weeks, until complete disappearance of maternal antibodies from blood. Because of persistent low ventricular rate (<60/min), seven days following birth, pacemaker implantation was performed. The baby is now at 40th week with no signs of cardiac failure and free of any medications. CONCLUSION: Up to date, no guidelines have been published for the treatment of "in utero-CHB" and only anecdotal reports are available. It has been stated that a combination therapy protocol is effective in reversing a 2nd degree CHB, but not for 3rd degree CHB. In cases of foetal bradycardia, weekly foetal echocardiographic monitoring needs to be performed and in cases of 2nd degree CHB and 3rd degree CHB maternal therapy could be suggested, as in our case, to avoid foetal heart failure. In cases of 3rd degree CHB often pacemaker implantation is needed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Antinuclear/blood
Fetal Diseases/therapy
Heart Block/congenital
Postnatal Care
Prenatal Care
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Betamethasone/therapeutic use
Cesarean Section
Female
Fetal Diseases/immunology
Fetal Diseases/ultrasonography
Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use
Heart Block/immunology
Heart Block/therapy
Heart Block/ultrasonography
Humans
Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use
Immunologic Factors
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pacemaker, Artificial
Plasmapheresis
Pregnancy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Antinuclear); 0 (Glucocorticoids); 0 (Immunoglobulins, Intravenous); 0 (Immunologic Factors); 0 (SS-A antibodies); 9842X06Q6M (Betamethasone)
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Cu] Class update date: 141105
[Lr] Last revision date:141105
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/1471-2393-13-220

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[PMID]: 23744610
[Au] Autor:Spirli C; Locatelli L; Morell CM; Fiorotto R; Morton SD; Cadamuro M; Fabris L; Strazzabosco M
[Ad] Address:Liver Center & Section of Digestive Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
[Ti] Title:Protein kinase A-dependent pSer(675) -ß-catenin, a novel signaling defect in a mouse model of congenital hepatic fibrosis.
[So] Source:Hepatology;58(5):1713-23, 2013 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1527-3350
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: Genetically determined loss of fibrocystin function causes congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF), Caroli disease (CD), and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Cystic dysplasia of the intrahepatic bile ducts and progressive portal fibrosis characterize liver pathology in CHF/CD. At a cellular level, several functional morphological and signaling changes have been reported including increased levels of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). In this study we addressed the relationships between increased cAMP and ß-catenin. In cholangiocytes isolated and cultured from Pkhd1(del4/del4) mice, stimulation of cAMP/PKA signaling (forskolin 10 µM) stimulated Ser(675) -phosphorylation of ß-catenin, its nuclear localization, and its transcriptional activity (western blot and TOP flash assay, respectively) along with a down-regulation of E-cadherin expression (immunocytochemistry and western blot); these changes were inhibited by the PKA blocker, PKI (1 µM). The Rho-GTPase, Rac-1, was also significantly activated by cAMP in Pkhd1(del4/del4) cholangiocytes. Rac-1 inhibition blocked cAMP-dependent nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity of pSer(675) -ß-catenin. Cell migration (Boyden chambers) was significantly higher in cholangiocytes obtained from Pkhd1(del4/del4) and was inhibited by: (1) PKI, (2) silencing ß-catenin (siRNA), and (3) the Rac-1 inhibitor NSC 23766. CONCLUSION: These data show that in fibrocystin-defective cholangiocytes, cAMP/PKA signaling stimulates pSer(675) -phosphorylation of ß-catenin and Rac-1 activity. In the presence of activated Rac-1, pSer(675) -ß-catenin is translocated to the nucleus, becomes transcriptionally active, and is responsible for increased motility of Pkhd1(del4/del4) cholangiocytes. ß-Catenin-dependent changes in cell motility may be central to the pathogenesis of the disease and represent a potential therapeutic target.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases/physiology
Genetic Diseases, Inborn/etiology
Liver Cirrhosis/etiology
Signal Transduction
beta Catenin/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus
Animals
Bile Ducts/cytology
Cell Movement
Cyclic AMP/physiology
Disease Models, Animal
Genetic Diseases, Inborn/metabolism
Liver Cirrhosis/metabolism
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Neuropeptides/physiology
Receptors, Cell Surface/physiology
rac1 GTP-Binding Protein/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Catnb protein, mouse); 0 (Neuropeptides); 0 (Pkhd1 protein, mouse); 0 (Rac1 protein, mouse); 0 (Receptors, Cell Surface); 0 (beta Catenin); E0399OZS9N (Cyclic AMP); EC 2.7.11.11 (Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases); EC 3.6.5.2 (rac1 GTP-Binding Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Cu] Class update date: 141104
[Lr] Last revision date:141104
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/hep.26554

  5 / 1204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23375562
[Au] Autor:Prestia A; Caroli A; Herholz K; Reiman E; Chen K; Jagust WJ; Frisoni GB; Translational Outpatient Memory Clinic Working Group; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Epidemiology Neuroimaging and Telemedicine, and Unit for the Clinical Translation of Research, IRCCS Centro San Giovanni di Dio FBF, Brescia, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Diagnostic accuracy of markers for prodromal Alzheimer's disease in independent clinical series.
[So] Source:Alzheimers Dement;9(6):677-86, 2013 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1552-5279
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To capitalize on data from different clinical series to compare sensitivity and specificity of individual biomarkers for predicting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: Medial temporal atrophy, cortical hypometabolism, and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers were assessed in 18 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) with prodromal AD (pAD; conversion time, 26 ± 12 months) and 18 stable MCI (sMCI) patients from the Translational Outpatient Memory Clinic cohort, as well as in 24 pAD patients (conversion time, 36 ± 12 months) and 33 sMCI patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort. Medial temporal atrophy was measured by manual, semi-automated, and automated hippocampal volumetry; cortical hypometabolism was measured using several indices of AD-related hypometabolism pattern; and cerebrospinal fluid markers were amyloid ß (Aß)42 and total tau protein concentrations. For each biomarker, sensitivity for pAD, specificity for sMCI, and diagnostic accuracy were computed. RESULTS: Sensitivity to predict MCI conversion to AD in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and Translational Outpatient Memory Clinic cohorts was 79% and 94% based on Aß42, 46% and 28% based on hippocampal volumes, 33% to 66% and 56% to 78% based on different hypometabolism indices, and 46% and 61% based on total tau levels, respectively. Specificity to exclude sMCI was 27% and 50% based on Aß42, 76% and 94% based on hippocampal volumes, 58% to 67% and 55% to 83% based on different hypometabolism indices, and 61% and 83% based on total tau levels, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Current findings suggest that Aß42 concentrations and hippocampal volumes may be used in combination to best identify pAD.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alzheimer Disease/diagnosis
Amyloid beta-Peptides/cerebrospinal fluid
Biological Markers/analysis
Cognition Disorders/cerebrospinal fluid
Cognition Disorders/diagnosis
Hippocampus/pathology
Peptide Fragments/cerebrospinal fluid
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders/complications
Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data
Disease Progression
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/diagnostic use
Hippocampus/radionuclide imaging
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Positron-Emission Tomography
Sensitivity and Specificity
Statistics, Nonparametric
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Amyloid beta-Peptides); 0 (Biological Markers); 0 (Peptide Fragments); 0 (amyloid beta-protein (1-42)); 0Z5B2CJX4D (Fluorodeoxyglucose F18)
[Em] Entry month:1406
[Cu] Class update date: 141104
[Lr] Last revision date:141104
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131108
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 1204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24712045
[Au] Autor:Dantey K; Guindi M; Zenali M
[Ti] Title:Education and imaging. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic: focal caroli disease mimicking cholangiocarcinoma.
[So] Source:J Gastroenterol Hepatol;29(3):420, 2014 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1440-1746
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Caroli Disease/diagnosis
Cholangiocarcinoma/diagnosis
Diagnosis, Differential
Liver Diseases/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bile Duct Neoplasms
Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic/abnormalities
Caroli Disease/complications
Caroli Disease/pathology
Caroli Disease/surgery
Cholangiopancreatography, Magnetic Resonance
Cysts/complications
Cysts/diagnosis
Cysts/pathology
Female
Hepatectomy/methods
Humans
Liver Diseases/complications
Liver Diseases/pathology
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140407
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 1204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24022473
[Au] Autor:Issar P; Issar SK
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiodiagnosis, J L N Hospital and Research Centre, Bhilai, Chhattisgarh, 490 006, India, mareesh_23@yahoo.co.in.
[Ti] Title:Caroli's disease.
[So] Source:Indian J Gastroenterol;33(5):500, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0975-0711
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12664-013-0403-5

  8 / 1204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24369984
[Au] Autor:Ballotari P; Chiatamone Ranieri S; Vicentini M; Caroli S; Gardini A; Rodolfi R; Crucco R; Greci M; Manicardi V; Giorgi Rossi P
[Ad] Address:Servizio Interaziendale di Epidemiologia, Local Health Authority of Reggio Emilia, Italy....
[Ti] Title:Building a population-based diabetes register: an Italian experience.
[So] Source:Diabetes Res Clin Pract;103(1):79-87, 2014 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8227
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: To describe the methodology used to set up the Reggio Emilia (northern Italy) Diabetes Register. The prevalence estimates on December 31st, 2009 are also provided. METHODS: The Diabetes Register covers all residents in the Reggio Emilia province. The register was created by deterministic linkage of six routinely collected data sources through a definite algorithm able to ascertain cases and to distinguish type of diabetes and model of care: Hospital Discharge, Drug Dispensation, Biochemistry Laboratory, Disease-specific Exemption, Diabetes Outpatient Clinics, and Mortality databases. Using these data, we estimated crude prevalence on December 31st, 2009 by sex, age groups, and type of diabetes. RESULTS: There were 25,425 ascertained prevalent cases on December 31st, 2009. Drug Dispensation and Exemption databases made the greatest contribution to prevalence. Analyzing overlapping sources, more than 80% of cases were reported by at least two sources. Crude prevalence was 4.8% and 5.9% for the whole population and for people aged 18 years and over, respectively. Males accounted for 53.6%. Type 1 diabetes accounted for 3.8% of cases, while people with Type 2 diabetes were the overriding majority (91.2%), and Diabetes Outpatient Clinics treated 75.4% of people with Type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSION: The Register is able to quantify the burden of disease, the first step in planning, implementing, and monitoring appropriate interventions. All data sources contributed to completeness and/or accuracy of the Register. Although all cases are identified by deterministic record linkage, manual revision and General Practitioner involvement are still necessary when information is insufficient or conflicting.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Databases, Factual
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology
Registries/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Child
Data Collection
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy
Female
Humans
Italy/epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Prevalence
Survival Rate
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140203
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 1204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24114580
[Au] Autor:Büscher R; Büscher AK; Weber S; Mohr J; Hegen B; Vester U; Hoyer PF
[Ad] Address:Children's Hospital, Pediatrics II, University of Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122, Essen, Germany, rainer.buescher@uk-essen.de.
[Ti] Title:Clinical manifestations of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD): kidney-related and non-kidney-related phenotypes.
[So] Source:Pediatr Nephrol;29(10):1915-25, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1432-198X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), although less frequent than the dominant form, is a common, inherited ciliopathy of childhood that is caused by mutations in the PKHD1-gene on chromosome 6. The characteristic dilatation of the renal collecting ducts starts in utero and can present at any stage from infancy to adulthood. Renal insufficiency may already begin in utero and may lead to early abortion or oligohydramnios and lung hypoplasia in the newborn. However, there are also affected children who have no evidence of renal dysfunction in utero and who are born with normal renal function. Up to 30 % of patients die in the perinatal period, and those surviving the neonatal period reach end stage renal disease (ESRD) in infancy, early childhood or adolescence. In contrast, some affected patients have been diagnosed as adults with renal function ranging from normal to moderate renal insufficiency to ESRD. The clinical spectrum of ARPKD is broader than previously recognized. While bilateral renal enlargement with microcystic dilatation is the predominant clinical feature, arterial hypertension, intrahepatic biliary dysgenesis remain important manifestations that affect approximately 45 % of infants. All patients with ARPKD develop clinical findings of congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF); however, non-obstructive dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts in the liver (Caroli's disease) is seen at the histological level in only a subset of patients. Cholangitis and variceal bleeding, sequelae of portal hypertension, are life-threatening complications that may occur more often in advanced cases of liver disease. In this review we focus on common and uncommon kidney-related and non-kidney-related phenotypes. Clinical management of ARPKD patients should include consideration of potential problems related to these manifestations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00467-013-2634-1

  10 / 1204 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24321359
[Au] Autor:Vajro P; Ferrante L; Lenta S; Mandato C; Persico M
[Ad] Address:Chair of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Baronissi (Salerno), Italy. Electronic address: pvajro@unisa.it....
[Ti] Title:Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.
[So] Source:Dig Liver Dis;46(4):295-301, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3562
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Liver Diseases/therapy
Transition to Adult Care
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Adult
Biliary Atresia/therapy
Caroli Disease/therapy
Child
Child Development
Chronic Disease
Disease Management
Fatty Liver/therapy
Hepatitis, Autoimmune/therapy
Hepatitis, Viral, Human/therapy
Hepatolenticular Degeneration/therapy
Humans
Liver Transplantation/rehabilitation
Medication Adherence
Reproductive Health
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140310
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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