Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Central and Nervous and System and Bacterial and Infections [Words]
References found : 3667 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 367 go to page                         

  1 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28471051
[Au] Autor:Döring C; Regen T; Gertig U; van Rossum D; Winkler A; Saiepour N; Brück W; Hanisch UK; Janova H
[Ad] Address:Institute of Neuropathology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, 37075, Germany.
[Ti] Title:A presumed antagonistic LPS identifies distinct functional organization of TLR4 in mouse microglia.
[So] Source:Glia;65(7):1176-1185, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1098-1136
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Microglia as principle innate immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS) are the first line of defense against invading pathogens. They are capable of sensing infections through diverse receptors, such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). This receptor is best known for its ability to recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a causative agent of gram-negative sepsis and septic shock. A putative, naturally occurring antagonist of TLR4 derives from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. However, the antagonistic potential of R. sphaeroides LPS (Rs-LPS) is no universal feature, since several studies suggested agonistic rather than antagonistic actions of this molecule depending on the investigated mammalian species. Here we show the agonistic versus antagonistic potential of Rs-LPS in primary mouse microglia. We demonstrate that Rs-LPS efficiently induces the release of cytokines and chemokines, which depends on TLR4, MyD88, and TRIF, but not CD14. Furthermore, Rs-LPS is able to regulate the phagocytic capacity of microglia as agonist, while it antagonizes Re-LPS-induced MHC I expression. Finally, to our knowledge, we are the first to provide in vivo evidence for an agonistic potential of Rs-LPS, as it efficiently triggers the recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the endotoxin-challenged CNS. Together, our results argue for a versatile and complex organization of the microglial TLR4 system, which specifically translates exogenous signals into cellular functions. Importantly, as demonstrated here for microglia, the antagonistic potential of Rs-LPS needs to be considered with caution, as reactions to Rs-LPS not only differ by cell type, but even by function within one cell type.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology
Microglia/drug effects
Toll-Like Receptor 4/antagonists & inhibitors
Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/genetics
Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/metabolism
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Brain/cytology
Cells, Cultured
Corpus Striatum/drug effects
Cytokines/metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/genetics
Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/metabolism
Macrophages/drug effects
Macrophages/physiology
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Transgenic
Myelin Sheath/drug effects
Myelin Sheath/pathology
Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/genetics
Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/metabolism
Phagocytosis/drug effects
Phagocytosis/physiology
Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics
Up-Regulation/drug effects
Up-Regulation/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport); 0 (Cytokines); 0 (Lipopolysaccharide Receptors); 0 (Lipopolysaccharides); 0 (Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88); 0 (TICAM-1 protein, mouse); 0 (Tlr4 protein, mouse); 0 (Toll-Like Receptor 4)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/glia.23151

  2 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29274210
[Au] Autor:Bamba S; Zoungrana J; Nikièma Z; Sondo AK; Ndiaye JL; Bretagne S
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Parasitology-Mycology, Higher Institute of Health Sciences, Polytechnic University, Rue Alwata Diawara, Bobo-Dioulasso, BP 1091, Burkina Faso
[Ti] Title:Impact of alternative treatment approach for cerebral toxoplasmosis among HIV/AIDS patients from a resource-poor setting in Burkina Faso
[So] Source:Ann Parasitol;63(3):173­181, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2299-0631
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cerebral toxoplasmosis is caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii because of reactivation of latent tissue cysts in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients with severe immunosuppression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the benefit of co-trimoxazole in presumptive and prevention of cerebral toxoplasmosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/AIDS patients at Bobo-Dioulasso Hospital in Burkina Faso from June 2012 to October 2014. ELISA and ELFA were performed on serum for the quantitative determination of IgG and IgM anti-T. gondii, respectively. The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis was 29.3%. No IgM antibodies for T. gondii were found. Six patients with Toxoplasma-specific antibodies presented cerebral toxoplasmosis. All patients were infected by HIV-1 with the median of CD4+ T lymphocytes at 141 cells/µl. No patient was under antiretroviral therapy. No case of cerebral toxoplasmosis was noted in patients receiving co-trimoxazole in prevention. Presumptive treatment of cerebral toxoplasmosis with co-trimoxazole was effective in all patients with a significant clinical improvement in 83.3%. These results attest the benefit of cotrimoxazole in cerebral toxoplasmosis treatment in countries where drug resources are limited when sulfadiazine is not available. Ours finding highlight the importance of establishing toxoplasmosis chemoprophylaxis to HIV with severe immunosuppression patients and positive Toxoplasma serology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: HIV Infections/complications
Toxoplasmosis, Cerebral/complications
Toxoplasmosis, Cerebral/drug therapy
Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents/economics
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Burkina Faso/epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
HIV Infections/epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G/blood
Immunoglobulin M/blood
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Toxoplasmosis, Cerebral/blood
Toxoplasmosis, Cerebral/epidemiology
Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/economics
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Immunoglobulin G); 0 (Immunoglobulin M); 8064-90-2 (Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171224
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.17420/ap6303.103

  3 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29390337
[Au] Autor:González Saldaña N; Galvis Trujillo DM; Borbolla Pertierra AM; Mondragón Pineda AI; Juárez Olguín H
[Ad] Address:Department of Infectology, National Institute of Pediatrics.
[Ti] Title:Linezolid-associated optic neuropathy in a pediatric patient with Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9200, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Toxic optic neuropathies are alterations of the optic nerve and can be caused by environmental, pharmacological, or nutritional agents. CASE: It is about a 7-year-old male patient, a native of the State of Mexico, Mexico who was diagnosed with cervical mycobacterial lymphadenitis that required management with linezolid. OBSERVATIONS: After 7 months of treatment, visual acuity of the left eye decreased and was accompanied by headache. Neuroinfection and other central nervous system affections were discarded. An adverse effect related to treatment with linezolid was suspected, and linezolid was suspended. The symptoms subsided after discontinuation; however, the patient continued to show decreased visual acuity of the left eye, assessed by his ability to count 2 fingers. The right eye remained unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: Neurotoxicity can be decreased by reducing the total dose of linezolid or by administrating it in an intermittent form. To avoid progression and loss of vision, we suggest frequent periodic ophthalmological evaluation in patients treated with linezolid.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects
Linezolid/adverse effects
Lymphadenitis/drug therapy
Lymphadenitis/microbiology
Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/drug therapy
Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/microbiology
Optic Nerve Diseases/chemically induced
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Humans
Male
Nontuberculous Mycobacteria
Visual Acuity
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); ISQ9I6J12J (Linezolid)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009200

  4 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28743387
[Au] Autor:Dabrowski P; Jurkiewicz J; Czernicki Z; Koszewski W; Jasielski P
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, II Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. Electronic address: piotrdabrowski2000@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Polymerase chain reaction based detection of bacterial 16S rRNA gene in the cerebrospinal fluid in the diagnosis of bacterial central nervous system infection in the course of external cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Comparison with standard diagnostics currently used in clinical practice.
[So] Source:Neurol Neurochir Pol;51(5):388-394, 2017 Sep - Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0028-3843
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: External drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a commonly used neurosurgical procedure. Complications of the procedure comprise central nervous system (CNS) bacterial infections, the frequency of which is estimated at around 6-10%. Detection of these infections is ineffective in many cases. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of bacterial 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) in the CSF. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study group consisted of 50 patients. Clinical signs of CNS infection were monitored and routine laboratory and microbiological tests were performed. The results of standard methods were compared with the bacterial 16S rDNA detection. RESULTS: Using cultures, CNS infection was diagnosed in 8 patients, colonization of the drainage catheter in 6 patients, and sample contamination in 7 patients. In the group of the remaining 29 patients, no positive CSF culture was obtained and 13 of these patients also had all negative results for 16S rDNA detection. For the remaining 16 patients of this group, CNS infection, colonization of the catheter and sample contamination were diagnosed via PCR alone. Routine biochemical CSF tests and blood inflammatory parameters had a supporting value. CONCLUSIONS: Routine hospital tests do not provide rapid and efficient detection of the external drainage related bacterial CNS infection. It is justified to use several diagnostic methods simultaneously. The16S rDNA determination in CSF can increase the probability of detection of possible pathogens.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29409994
[Au] Autor:Bodilsen J; Storgaard M; Larsen L; Wiese L; Helweg-Larsen J; Lebech AM; Brandt C; Østergaard C; Nielsen H; DASGIB study group
[Ad] Address:Department of Infectious Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. Electronic address: Jacob.bodilsen@rn.dk.
[Ti] Title:Infectious meningitis and encephalitis in adults in Denmark: a prospective nationwide observational cohort study (DASGIB).
[So] Source:Clin Microbiol Infect;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1469-0691
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To monitor epidemiological trends of infectious meningitis (bacterial and viral) and encephalitis in Denmark. METHODS: Nationwide prospective observational study of all cases of proven community-acquired infectious meningitis and encephalitis in adults treated in all infectious diseases departments in Denmark from 1 January 2015 to 30 June 2016. We included data on symptoms, aetiology, treatment and outcome assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) 30 days after discharge. GOS 1-4 was categorized as unfavourable outcome. RESULTS: During 18 months of observation, we identified 252 cases of viral meningitis (3.6/100 000/year), 214 cases of bacterial meningitis (3.1/100 000/year) and 96 cases of infectious encephalitis (1.4/100 000/year). In bacterial meningitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent infectious agent (n = 101) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (n = 24) and ß-haemolytic streptococci (n = 14). Meningococcal meningitis was rare (n = 11). In encephalitis, herpes simplex virus type 1 was most common (n = 37) followed by varicella zoster virus (n = 20), whereas varicella zoster virus (n = 61) was most common in viral meningitis followed by enterovirus (n = 50) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (n = 46). Case fatality and unfavourable outcome occurred in 31/214 (15%) and 96/214 (45%) with bacterial meningitis and in 5/96 (5%) and 55/89 (62%) with encephalitis. For viral meningitis, unfavourable outcome occurred in 41/252 (17%). CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiology and clinical presentation of the examined central nervous system infections differed considerably and bacterial meningitis was more frequent than previously estimated. Overall prognosis remains poor for bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Prospective nationwide clinical databases of central nervous system infections may be superior to epidemiological monitoring based on notifications or laboratory systems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29443761
[Au] Autor:Birlutiu V; Birlutiu RM
[Ad] Address:Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Medicine Sibiu.
[Ti] Title:Haemolytic-uremic syndrome due to infection with adenovirus: A case report and literature review.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(7):e9895, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Haemolytic-uremic syndrome is a rare but serious complication of bacterial and viral infections, which is characterized by the triad of: acute renal failure, microangiopathic haemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, sometimes severe, requiring peritoneal dialysis. In Europe, hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in paediatric pathology is primarily caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157, followed by O26. Beside these etiologies, there are other bacterial and viral infections, and also noninfectious ones that have been associated to lead to HUS as well: in the progression of neoplasia, medication-related, post-transplantation, during pregnancy or associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus or family causes with autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. In terms of pathogenesis, HUS is the result of endothelial injury, most commonly being a result of the action of Shiga toxin. The unfavorable prognosis factors being represented by the age of more than 5 years old, different etiologies from STEC, persistent oligoanuria, central nervous system and glomerular impairment, the association of fever with leukocytosis. HUS is responsible for 7% of cases of hypertension in infants, and an important cause of significant kidney damage in adults. PATIENT CONCERNS: We present one case of HUS caused by adenovirus in a boy of 1 year and 7 months old with severe evolution, which required peritoneal dialysis. DIAGNOSE: Stool sample repeated examination for adenovirus antigen was positive in 2 samples. INTERVENTION: During hospitalization, the patient required 8 peritoneal dialysis sessions. OUTCOME: The renal function was corrected on discharge, the patient required cardiovascular monitoring 1 month after discharge. LESSON: Although the most common cause that leads to HUS remains STEC, other etiologies like viral ones that may be responsible for severe enteric infection with progression into HUS should not be neglected.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acute Kidney Injury
Adenoviridae
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome
Peritoneal Dialysis/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology
Acute Kidney Injury/therapy
Adenoviridae/immunology
Adenoviridae/isolation & purification
Diagnosis, Differential
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome/physiopathology
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome/therapy
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome/virology
Humans
Infant
Kidney Function Tests/methods
Male
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009895

  7 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29417764
[Au] Autor:Ayele AA; Gebresillassie BM; Erku DA; Gebreyohannes EA; Demssie DG; Mersha AG; Tegegn HG
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Prospective evaluation of Ceftriaxone use in medical and emergency wards of Gondar university referral hospital, Ethiopia.
[So] Source:Pharmacol Res Perspect;6(1), 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2052-1707
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ceftriaxone is among the most commonly utilized antibiotics owing to its high potency, wide spectrum of activity, and low risk of toxicity. It is used to treat different types of bacterial infections including pneumonia, bone infections, abdominal infections, Skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections. However, evidence around the globe shows the misuse of Ceftriaxone. This study aimed at evaluating the appropriateness of ceftriaxone use in medical and emergency wards of Gondar university referral hospital (GURH), Northwest Ethiopia. A prospective, cross-sectional study design was employed to evaluate the use of ceftriaxone. The medical records of patients who received ceftriaxone were reviewed prospectively between January 1 and March 30, 2017. Appropriateness of ceftriaxone use was evaluated as per the protocol developed from current treatment guidelines. A total of 390 patients' medical records were reviewed. The utilization rate of ceftriaxone was found to be high with a point prevalence of 59%. Ceftriaxone was empirically used in 79.5% of cases. The most common indications of Ceftriaxone were respiratory tract infections (29.3%), central nervous system infections (24.1%), and prophylactic indications (16.4%). The mean duration of ceftriaxone therapy in our study was 11.47 days, with a range of 1-52 days. More than two-thirds (80.2%) of ceftriaxone use were found to be inappropriate and majority of unjustified ceftriaxone use emanated from inappropriate frequency of administration (78.3%), absence of culture and sensitivity test (68.7%), and duration of therapy (47%). Empiric treatment with ceftriaxone and the presence of coadministered drugs was significantly associated with its inappropriate use. The present study revealed a very high rate of inappropriate use of ceftriaxone which may potentially lead to emergence of drug-resistant microorganisms and ultimately exposes the patient to treatment failure and increased cost of therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/prp2.383

  8 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29455403
[Au] Autor:Monticelli J; Geremia N; D'Agaro P; Petix V; Luzzati R
[Ad] Address:Infectious Disease Unit, University Hospital "Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Trieste", Piazza dell'Ospitale 2, 34125, Trieste, Italy. jacopo.mont@hotmail.it.
[Ti] Title:Aseptic central nervous system infections in adults: what predictor for unknown etiological diagnosis?
[So] Source:Neurol Sci;, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1590-3478
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Despite the availability of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs), most of aseptic acute meningitides, encephalitides, and meningoencephalitides (AAMEMs) in adults remain of unknown etiology so far. To shed light on such topic, we aimed to evaluate potential predictors for AAMEMs of unknown origin. We collected retrospectively data from all consecutive cases of AAMEMs in adults discharged from an Italian referral hospital, from January 2004 to December 2016. Laboratory analysis included common immunometric methods and NAATs. Potential predictors for unknown etiology (age, seasonality, serum C-reactive protein value, antibiotic use before lumbar puncture, immunodeficiency conditions, clinical symptoms and signs) were evaluated by a logistic regression analysis model. A p value ≤ 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. The study included 92 patients (median age 39 years; 54.3% males) affected by meningitis (n = 57), encephalitis (n = 25), and meningoencephalitis (n = 10). The identified agents that cause AAMEMs were herpesviruses (20.7%), enteroviruses (5.4%), tick-borne encephalitis virus (3.3%), influenza virus A (2.2%), West Nile virus (1.1%), and parvovirus B19 (1.1%), while 66.3% of cases were of unknown etiology. No predictor was found to be significantly associated with AAMEMs of unknown etiology. We suggest that potential infectious agents causing undiagnosed cases should be investigated among non-bacterial, non-opportunistic, and non-seasonal organisms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10072-018-3274-9

  9 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29300762
[Au] Autor:Rasheed S; Sánchez SS; Yousuf S; Honoré SM; Choudhary MI
[Ad] Address:H. E. J. Research Institute of Chemistry, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Drug repurposing: In-vitro anti-glycation properties of 18 common drugs.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190509, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Drug repositioning or repurposing, i.e. identifying new indications for existing drugs, has gained increasing attention in the recent years. This approach enables the scientists to discover "new targets" for known drugs in a cost and time efficient manner. Glycation, the non-enzymatic reaction of sugars with proteins or nucleic acids to form early glycation (Amadori or fructosamine) products, is a key molecular basis of diabetic complications. Inhibiting the process of non-enzymatic protein glycation is one of the key strategies to prevent glycation-mediated diabetic complications. The present study focuses on the anti-glycation activity of 18 drugs, commonly used for the treatment of gastrointestinal, central nervous system, inflammatory diseases, bacterial infections, and gout. This study was carried out by using two in-vitro protein anti-glycation assay models. Results revealed that nimesulide (3), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, possesses a good anti-glycation activity in in-vitro BSA-MG and BSA-glucose glycation models with IC50 values of 330.56 ± 2.90, and 145.46 ± 16.35 µM, respectively. Phloroglucinol dihydrate (11), a drug used for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, showed a weak activity in BSA-MG glycation model (IC50 = 654.89 ± 2.50 µM), while it showed a good activity in BSA-glucose assay (IC50 = 148.23 ± 0.15 µM). Trimethylphloroglucinol (9), a drug used for the treatment of pain related to functional disorders of the digestive and biliary tracts, also showed a good antiglycation activity in BSA-MG model (IC50 = 321.15 ± 1.26 µM), while it was found to be inactive in in-vitro BSA-glucose assay (IC50 = 12.95% inhibition). These activities of drugs were compared with the anti-glycation activity of the standard, rutin (IC50 = 294.5 ± 1.50 µM in BSA-MG glycation model, and IC50 = 86.94 ± 0.24 µM in BSA- glucose model). Rest of the drugs exhibited a relatively weak antiglycation activity. This study identifies nimesulide (3), and phloroglucinol dihydrate (11) as new inhibitors of in-vitro protein glycation for further investigations as potential anti-diabetic agents.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Drug Repositioning
Glucose/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
In Vitro Techniques
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:IY9XDZ35W2 (Glucose)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180105
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190509

  10 / 3667 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29436421
[Au] Autor:Liesman RM; Strasburg AP; Heitman AK; Theel ES; Patel R; Binnicker MJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of a Commercial Multiplex Molecular Panel For the Diagnosis of Infectious Meningitis and Encephalitis.
[So] Source:J Clin Microbiol;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1098-660X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rapid and accurate laboratory tests are important for the timely diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system infections. The FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis (ME) panel (BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT) is an FDA-cleared, multiplex molecular panel that allows for the detection of 14 pathogens (bacterial [n=6], viral [n=7], and fungal [n=1]) from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this study, we evaluated the performance characteristics of the FilmArray ME panel using clinical, residual CSF samples (n=291) that tested positive by a routine method(s) (e.g., bacterial culture, individual real-time PCR assay) for a pathogen represented on the ME panel. Of note, a subset (n=76) of the CSF specimens were collected during the pre-vaccine era, and had been characterized as positive for a bacterial pathogen. The FilmArray ME panel demonstrated an overall percent positive agreement (PPA) of 97.5% (78/80) for bacterial pathogens, 90.1% (145/161) for viruses, and 52% (26/50) for Despite the low overall agreement (52%) between the ME panel and antigen testing for detection of , the percent positive agreement of the FilmArray assay was 92.3% (12/13) when compared directly to the results of routine fungal smear or culture. The FilmArray ME panel offers a rapid (∼60 min), syndromic-based approach for the diagnosis of select meningitis and encephalitis pathogens.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 367 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information