Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Central and Nervous and System and Cysts [Words]
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[PMID]: 29400038
[Au] Autor:Podeur P; Okhremchuk I; Morvan JB; Vatin L; Rivière D; de Faria A; Joubert C; Dagain A
[Ti] Title:[Multiple intracranial epidermoid cysts: Case report].
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(4):159-62, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Epidermoid cyst is a benign and rare tumor, that evolves slowly. We describe the case of a 55 years-old woman, who came to our consultation for atypical trigeminal neuralgia of left V1 and V2 nerves. Brain MRI found two tumors: T1W hypointense with no appreciable enhancement after gadolinium injection and T2W and diffusion hyperintense. This last feature was in favour of an epidermoid cyst, but the multiplicity of cerebral lesions was definitely not in favor of such a diagnos­tic. They were located behind the right eye and in the left Meckel's cave (trigeminal cave). The surgical strategy consis­ted in removal the retro orbital tumor witch was the most acces­si­ble of both the diagnostic of epidermoid cyst was retaned thanks to the anatomopathology report. As these lesions had the exact same characteristics, we concluded that they were simi­lar. The second epidermoid cyst was not removed because of surgical risk, its benign nature and low evolutionary potential.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging
Cranial Fossa, Posterior/diagnostic imaging
Epidermal Cyst/diagnostic imaging
Orbital Diseases/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Brain Diseases/pathology
Cranial Fossa, Posterior/pathology
Epidermal Cyst/pathology
Epidermal Cyst/surgery
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Middle Aged
Orbital Diseases/pathology
Orbital Diseases/surgery
Trigeminal Neuralgia/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29274210
[Au] Autor:Bamba S; Zoungrana J; Nikièma Z; Sondo AK; Ndiaye JL; Bretagne S
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Parasitology-Mycology, Higher Institute of Health Sciences, Polytechnic University, Rue Alwata Diawara, Bobo-Dioulasso, BP 1091, Burkina Faso
[Ti] Title:Impact of alternative treatment approach for cerebral toxoplasmosis among HIV/AIDS patients from a resource-poor setting in Burkina Faso
[So] Source:Ann Parasitol;63(3):173­181, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2299-0631
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cerebral toxoplasmosis is caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii because of reactivation of latent tissue cysts in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients with severe immunosuppression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the benefit of co-trimoxazole in presumptive and prevention of cerebral toxoplasmosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/AIDS patients at Bobo-Dioulasso Hospital in Burkina Faso from June 2012 to October 2014. ELISA and ELFA were performed on serum for the quantitative determination of IgG and IgM anti-T. gondii, respectively. The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis was 29.3%. No IgM antibodies for T. gondii were found. Six patients with Toxoplasma-specific antibodies presented cerebral toxoplasmosis. All patients were infected by HIV-1 with the median of CD4+ T lymphocytes at 141 cells/µl. No patient was under antiretroviral therapy. No case of cerebral toxoplasmosis was noted in patients receiving co-trimoxazole in prevention. Presumptive treatment of cerebral toxoplasmosis with co-trimoxazole was effective in all patients with a significant clinical improvement in 83.3%. These results attest the benefit of cotrimoxazole in cerebral toxoplasmosis treatment in countries where drug resources are limited when sulfadiazine is not available. Ours finding highlight the importance of establishing toxoplasmosis chemoprophylaxis to HIV with severe immunosuppression patients and positive Toxoplasma serology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: HIV Infections/complications
Toxoplasmosis, Cerebral/complications
Toxoplasmosis, Cerebral/drug therapy
Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents/economics
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Burkina Faso/epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
HIV Infections/epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G/blood
Immunoglobulin M/blood
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Toxoplasmosis, Cerebral/blood
Toxoplasmosis, Cerebral/epidemiology
Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/economics
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Immunoglobulin G); 0 (Immunoglobulin M); 8064-90-2 (Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171224
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.17420/ap6303.103

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[PMID]: 29501019
[Au] Autor:Endo Y; Kitago M; Miyajima A; Kurihara I; Kameyama K; Shinoda M; Yagi H; Abe Y; Hibi T; Takagi C; Nakano Y; Koizumi W; Itano O; Kitagawa Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Two-stage resection of a bilateral pheochromocytoma and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease: A case report.
[So] Source:Int J Surg Case Rep;44:139-142, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:2210-2612
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL disease) is a hereditary disease in which tumors and cysts develop in many organs, in association with central nervous system hemangioblastomas, pheochromocytomas, and pancreatic tumors. We herein report a case of vHL disease (type 2A) associated with bilateral pheochromocytomas, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET), and cerebellar hemangioblastomas treated via pancreatectomy after adrenalectomy. CASE PRESENTATION: A 51-year-old woman presented with a cerebellar tumor, bilateral hypernephroma, and pancreatic tumor detected during a medical checkup. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed a bilateral adrenal gland tumor and a tumor in the head of the pancreas, while an abdominal computed tomography examination revealed a 30-mm tumor with strong enhancement in the head of the pancreas. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed a hemangioblastoma in the cerebellum. Therefore, a diagnosis of vHL disease (type 2A) was made. Her family medical history included renal cell carcinoma in her father and bilateral adrenal pheochromocytoma and spinal hemangioblastoma in her brother. A detailed examination of endocrine function showed that the adrenal mass was capable of producing catecholamine. Treatment of the pheochromocytoma was prioritized, and therefore, laparoscopic left adrenalectomy and subtotal resection of the right adrenal gland were performed. Once the postoperative steroid levels were replenished, subtotal stomach-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed for the PNET. After a good postoperative course, the patient was discharged in remission on the 11th day following surgery. Histopathological examination findings indicated NET G2 (MIB-1 index 10-15%) pT3N0M0 Stage II A and microcystic serous cystadenoma throughout the resected specimen. The patient is scheduled to undergo treatment for the cerebellar hemangioblastoma. CONCLUSION: A two-staged resection is a safe and effective treatment option for bilateral pheochromocytoma and PNET associated with vHL disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 5833 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29454466
[Au] Autor:Kouadria R; Derkaoui M
[Ad] Address:Département de neurochirurgie, faculté de médecine, UDL Sidi Bel-Abbés, Algérie. Electronic address: ribhk@yahoo.fr.
[Ti] Title:Kystes dermoïdes de la fosse cérébrale postérieure chez l'enfant révélés par des méningites aseptiques récidivantes : à propos de deux cas et revue de la littérature. [Dermoid cysts of the posterior cerebral fossa in children revealed by recurrent aseptic meningitis: Report of two cases and a review of the literature].
[So] Source:Neurochirurgie;, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1773-0619
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Dermoid cysts of central nervous system are very rare. The usual clinical presentation is dominated by intracranial hypertension, epilepsy and cranial palsy. The revelation mode could be recurrent aseptic meningitis. AIM: The aim of this case report is to consider the dermoid cyst as regards the differential diagnosis in children treated for recurrent aseptic meningitis to avoid misdiagnosis and ice qui a orienté le diagnostic à une méningitnadequate treatment. METHODS: Two children were admitted in the pediatric department for recurrent aseptic meningitis. The MRI confirmed the presence of a posterior fossa dermoid cyst. RESULTS: Loss of meningitis after microsurgical resection. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of dermoid cyst is performed and reconsidered at an early stage in aseptic meningitis in order to establish an adequate therapy, which is surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 5833 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29381627
[Au] Autor:Aydin MD; Karaavci NC; Akyuz ME; Sahin MH; Zeynal M; Kanat A; Altinors MN
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Faculty of Ataturk University, Erzurum.
[Ti] Title:A New Technique in Surgical Management of the Giant Cerebral Hydatid Cysts.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;, 2018 Jan 19.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: In hydatid disease, the central nervous system is affected approximately in 2% to 3% of patients. Surgical management in these patients is important. To develop a surgical technique to avoid the formation of great volume of cavity after hydatid cyst removal and prevent complications associated with brain collapse and cortical convolution. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 2 patients, hydatid cysts were delivered by this new technique. A balloon filled with 150 cc of sterile air/distilled water was placed in the cavity until the balloon filled the entire cavity. Air/distilled water evacuation was continued at a rate of 20 cc/d and, after a week, eventually, the balloons were removed RESULTS:: All cysts were delivered without rupture. Neurologic outcomes were good. No complications were observed related to usage of the system such as balloon rupture, evacuation problems, and infection. CONCLUSION: The authors believe that the balloon insertion technique may be a useful method to prevent brain collapse, cortical convolution, and complications associated with this condition. Further technical refinements of the system are needed for better results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004236

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[PMID]: 29379967
[Au] Autor:Liu Y; Olek M
[Ti] Title:Development of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder and Spinal Arachnoid Cysts in a Patient With Intractable Epilepsy.
[So] Source:J Am Osteopath Assoc;118(2):119-123, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1945-1997
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Neuromyelitis optica is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by severe relapsing attacks of optic neuritis and transverse myelitis. The current case describes a 29-year-old man with intractable epilepsy and diplegic spastic cerebral palsy who was given the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder after presenting with weakness, incontinence, and decreased visual acuity. His symptoms recurred 21 months after initial presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging of his spine revealed arachnoid cysts with regional mass effects. Differentiation of arachnoid cysts from a demyelinating process may be difficult in the early stages of the disease. Close monitoring of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder is important, especially in patients with recurrent or refractory symptoms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.7556/jaoa.2018.027

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[PMID]: 29379961
[Au] Autor:Dornbos D; Kim HJ; Butman JA; Lonser RR
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurological Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus.
[Ti] Title:Review of the Neurological Implications of von Hippel-Lindau Disease.
[So] Source:JAMA Neurol;, 2018 Jan 29.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6157
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease-associated central nervous system (CNS) lesions include hemangioblastomas and endolymphatic sac tumors (ELSTs), which are associated with significant neurological morbidity and mortality. Recent studies provide critical new biological, diagnostic, and management insights into these tumors. Observations: Biological features, natural history, clinical findings, and management strategies of VHL disease-associated CNS tumors are reviewed. The VHL disease results from a germline mutation of the VHL gene (located on the short arm of chromosome 3), a tumor suppressor that encodes for the VHL protein. Whereas VHL disease is associated with visceral manifestations, CNS lesions are the most common source of morbidity and mortality. Craniospinal hemangioblastomas are almost entirely (99%) found in the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. These tumors arise from multipotent hemangioblasts. Peritumoral cysts frequently underlie the clinical findings associated with hemangioblastomas (>90% of symptomatic tumors). Prospective natural history studies demonstrate that CNS hemangioblastomas typically grow in a saltatory pattern. Due to this unpredictable growth pattern, surgical resection is reserved for symptomatic lesions, as many tumors do not become symptomatic. Recent studies indicate that VHL disease-associated ELSTs cause audiovestibular morbidity (hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo) via 3 mechanisms-otic capsule invasion, intralabyrinthine hemorrhage, and endolymphatic hydrops. Specialized magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been defined to elucidate each of these mechanisms, even when a tumor mass is not identified on imaging. Endolymphatic sac tumors cause audiovestibular morbidity unrelated to size or progression, and resection is now recommended at initial discovery of a tumor mass or a tumor-associated mechanism of morbidity. Conclusions and Relevance: New insights into the development, pathobiological origin, natural history, and long-term outcomes of VHL disease-associated CNS tumors have redefined their management and treatment indications and potentially provide new targeted therapeutic strategies. Resection is reserved for symptomatic hemangioblastomas, but early resection of newly detected ELSTs is now recommended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180130
[Lr] Last revision date:180130
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.4469

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[PMID]: 29343557
[Au] Autor:Schultz KAP; Williams GM; Kamihara J; Stewart DR; Harris AK; Bauer AJ; Turner J; Shah R; Schneider K; Schneider KW; Carr AG; Harney LA; Baldinger S; Frazier AL; Orbach D; Schneider DT; Malkin D; Dehner LP; Messinger YH; Hill A
[Ad] Address:Cancer and Blood Disorders, International Pleuropulmonary Blastoma Registry and Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota krisann.schultz@childrensmn.org.
[Ti] Title:DICER1 and associated conditions: Identification of at-risk individuals and recommended surveillance strategies.
[So] Source:Clin Cancer Res;, 2018 Jan 17.
[Is] ISSN:1078-0432
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pathogenic germline DICER1 variants cause a hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome with a variety of manifestations. In addition to conferring increased cancer risks for pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) and ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, particularly Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor, individuals with pathogenic germline DICER1 variants may also develop lung cysts, cystic nephroma, renal sarcoma and Wilms tumor, nodular hyperplasia of the thyroid, nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma, ciliary body medulloepithelioma, genitourinary embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and brain tumors including pineoblastoma and pituitary blastoma. In May 2016, the International PPB Registry convened the inaugural International DICER1 Symposium to develop consensus testing, surveillance and treatment recommendations. Attendees from North America, Europe and Russia provided expert representation from the disciplines of pediatric oncology, endocrinology, genetics, genetic counseling, radiology, pediatric surgery, pathology and clinical research. Recommendations are provided for genetic testing, prenatal management, and surveillance for DICER1-associated pulmonary, renal, gynecologic, thyroid, ophthalmologic, otolaryngologic, central nervous system tumors and gastrointestinal polyps. Risk for most DICER1-associated neoplasms is highest in early childhood and decreases in adulthood. Individual and caregiver education and judicious imaging-based surveillance are the primary recommended approaches. These testing and surveillance recommendations reflect a consensus of expert opinion and current literature. As DICER1 research expands, guidelines for screening and treatment will continue to be updated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180118
[Lr] Last revision date:180118
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 5833 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29317060
[Au] Autor:Hulens M; Dankaerts W; Stalmans I; Somers A; Vansant G; Rasschaert R; Bruyninckx F
[Ad] Address:Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Unit, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Heverlee, Belgium. Electronic address: miekehulens@skynet.be.
[Ti] Title:Fibromyalgia and unexplained widespread pain: The idiopathic cerebrospinal pressure dysregulation hypothesis.
[So] Source:Med Hypotheses;110:150-154, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2777
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fibromyalgia (FM) is a debilitating, widespread pain disorder that is assumed to originate from inappropriate pain processing in the central nervous system. Psychological and behavioral factors are both believed to underlie the pathogenesis and complicate the treatment. This hypothesis, however, has not yet been sufficiently supported by scientific evidence and accumulating evidence supports a peripheral neurological origin of the symptoms. We postulate that FM and several unexplained widespread pain syndromes are caused by chronic postural idiopathic cerebrospinal hypertension. Thus, the symptoms originate from the filling of nerve root sleeves under high pressure with subsequent polyradiculopathy from the compression of the nerve root fibers (axons) inside the sleeves. Associated symptoms, such as bladder and bowel dysfunction, result from compression of the sacral nerve root fibers, and facial pain and paresthesia result from compression of the cranial nerve root fibers. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension, Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus and the clinical entity of symptomatic Tarlov cysts share similar central and peripheral neurological symptoms and are likely other manifestations of the same condition. The hypothesis presented in this article links the characteristics of fibromyalgia and unexplained widespread pain to cerebrospinal pressure dysregulation with support from scientific evidence and provides a conclusive explanation for the multitude of symptoms associated with fibromyalgia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180110
[Lr] Last revision date:180110
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 5833 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29305684
[Au] Autor:Çavus G; Açik V; Çavus Y; Bilgin E; Gezercan Y; Ökten AI
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Adana Numune Training and Research Hospital, Serinevler Mah, Ege Bagatur Bulvari, 01260, Yüregir/Adana, Turkey. gokhanctf@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:An extraaxially localized intrasellar giant hydatid cyst with hypophyseal insufficiency.
[So] Source:Childs Nerv Syst;, 2018 Jan 05.
[Is] ISSN:1433-0350
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: A hydatid cyst is a parasitic illness that is caused by the larvae of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatid cysts occur in the liver in 75% and in the lungs in 15% of cases. Central nervous system involvement is rare (perhaps as low as 1%), and the majority of such cases are observed in children. Headache and vomiting are the most frequently observed symptoms. In patients diagnosed with a hydatid cyst, imaging methods and serologic tests are very important for identifying cranial involvement. The most curative method is to remove the unruptured cyst using Dowling's method and to then wash the resulting gap with sodium chloride. METHODS: The patient was a 16-year-old female with previous occasional headaches, progressive loss of vision, and general affective disorder. RESULTS: The patient presented at the emergency department with the above-mentioned complaints. She was hospitalized for a large cystic lesion in an extraaxially intrasellar location based on computerized tomography (CT) of the brain. The cyst was excised, and medical treatment was applied. CONCLUSIONS: Hydatid cysts are rarely located in the central nervous system. Treatment involves surgical and medical interventions. In this article, we present the first published case of a giant hydatid cyst with an extraaxial intrasellar location. This is the first such case to be reported in the literature. The cyst caused somnolence, general affective disorder, panhypopituitarism, and progressive loss of vision.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180106
[Lr] Last revision date:180106
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00381-017-3715-4


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