Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Cestode and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29518254
[Au] Autor:Díaz Á; Sagasti C; Casaravilla C
[Ad] Address:Área/Cátedra de Inmunología, Departamento de Biociencias (Facultad de Química) e Instituto de Química Biológica (Facultad de Ciencias), Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.
[Ti] Title:Granulomatous responses in larval taeniid infections.
[So] Source:Parasite Immunol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3024
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Granulomas are responses to persistent nonliving bodies or pathogens, centrally featuring specialized macrophage forms called epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells. The larval stages of the cestode parasites of the taeniidae family (Taenia, Echinococcus) develop for years in fixed tissue sites in mammals. In consequence, they are targets of granulomatous responses. The information on tissue responses to larval taeniids is fragmented among host and parasite species, and scattered over many decades. We attempt to draw an integrated picture of these responses in solid tissues. The intensity of inflammation around live parasites spans a spectrum from minimal to high, parasite vitality correlating with low inflammation. The low end of the inflammatory spectrum features collagen capsules proximal to the parasites and moderate distal infiltration. The middle of the spectrum is dominated by classical granulomatous responses, whereas the high end features massive eosinophil invasions. Across the range of parasite species, much observational evidence suggests that eosinophils are highly effective at killing larval taeniids in solid tissues, before and during chronic granulomatous responses. The evidence available also suggests that these parasites are adapted to inhibit host granulomatous responses, in part through the exacerbation of host regulatory mechanisms including regulatory T cells and TGF-beta. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pim.12523

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[PMID]: 29462133
[Au] Autor:Tsuboi M; Hayakawa K; Yamasaki H; Katanami Y; Yamamoto K; Kutsuna S; Takeshita N; Kanagawa S; Ohmagari N; Kato Y
[Ad] Address:Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Clinical characteristics and epidemiology of intestinal tapeworm infections over the last decade in Tokyo, Japan: A retrospective review.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(2):e0006297, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Tapeworm (cestode) infections occur worldwide even in developed countries and globalization has further complicated the epidemiology of such infections. Nonetheless, recent epidemiological data on cestode infections are limited. Our objectives were to elucidate the clinical characteristics and epidemiology of diphyllobothriosis and taeniosis in Tokyo, Japan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrospectively reviewed 24 cases of human intestinal cestode infection from January 2006 to December 2015 at a tertiary referral hospital in Tokyo, Japan. The patients included were diagnosed with cestode infection based on morphological and/or molecular identification of expelled proglottids and/or eggs and treated in our hospital. Fifteen and 9 patients were diagnosed with diphyllobothriosis and taeniosis, respectively. The median patient age was 31 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 26-42 years), and 13 (54%) were male. Most of the patients (91.7%) were Japanese. All patients were successfully treated with praziquantel without recurrence. Diphyllobothriosis was caused by Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense in all patients. Taeniosis was due to infection of Taenia saginata in 8 [88.9%] patients and T. asiatica in 1 [11.1%] patient. All patients with taeniosis were infected outside Japan, as opposed to those with diphyllobothriosis, which were domestic. The source locations of taeniosis were mostly in developing regions. The median duration of the stay of the patients with taeniosis at the respective source location was 1 month (IQR: 1-8). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The cestode infection, especially with D. nihonkaiense, has frequently occurred, even in Japanese cities, thereby implicating the probable increase in the prevalence of diphyllobothriosis among travelers, as the number of travelers is expected to increase owing to the Tokyo Olympics/Paralympics in 2020. In addition, medical practitioners should be aware of the importance of providing advice to travelers to endemic countries of taeniosis, including the potential risks of infection and preventive methods for these infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006297

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[PMID]: 29390318
[Au] Autor:Hench J; Cathomas G; Dettmer MS
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pathology, Cantonal Hospital Baselland, Liestal.
[Ti] Title:Hymenolepis nana: A case report of a perfect IBD camouflage warrior.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9146, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: There is evidence that parasitic helminths can ameliorate colitis in animal models and humans. Although infections with Hymenolepis sp. are clinically benign, the immunomodulatory interactions between host and parasite are largely unknown. PATIENT CONCERNS: In this study we examined the intestinal mucosa of an adult asymptomatic patient harboring adult and larval dwarf tapeworms (Hymenolepis nana) who underwent surgery for an unrelated reason. INTERVENTIONS: Routine histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to characterize the host's response to the parasite. Parasitic DNA was sequenced to identify the tapeworm species. DIAGNOSES: Morphological and immunohistochemical studies showed a nearly complete absence of an anti-parasite host immune response. The outer surface of the parasite also showed prominent cross-reactivity with various tested leukocyte antigens. Our findings closely resemble experimentally obtained data from the H. diminuta-infected rat at the state of persistent colonization. OUTCOMES: Cross-reactivity of parasite-borne molecules with anti-human-leukocyte antibodies indicates a potential functional role in active modulation of the host's immune response. LESSIONS: We believe that better understanding of the host-cestode interaction will certainly extend our knowledge on auto-aggressive disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and might provide potential treatment options.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hymenolepiasis/diagnosis
Hymenolepis nana
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/parasitology
Meckel Diverticulum/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Appendicitis/surgery
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidental Findings
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009146

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[PMID]: 29401572
[Au] Autor:Pospekhova NA
[Ti] Title:[Morphology of Cestode with Atypical Mode of Attachment].
[So] Source:Parazitologiia;51(1):15-21, 2017 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0031-1847
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Morphological features of R a u s c h i ta e n ia a n c o ra (Mamaev, 1959), a cestode with atypical mode of attachment («anchoring¼ in the wall of the host intestine), are considered. At I he center of the overgrown scolex there is a rostellum, size of which is close to that of the developed metacestode. Large suckers are composed mainly of loose parenchyma and fine radial muscle fibers. Fragments of host tissue are noted in the suckers' cavity. Surface of I he scolex is covered with large microtriches, which are in contact with the host tissue having signs of degradation. Distal cytoplasm is filled with vesicles coming from tegumental cytons. Rostellar glands that are common to cyclophyllids are not found. Excretory canals contain fluid (closer to the surface) and numerous lipid droplets (deeper located canals).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bird Diseases/parasitology
Cestoda/anatomy & histology
Cestoda/ultrastructure
Cestode Infections/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cestoda/physiology
Cestode Infections/parasitology
Charadriiformes/parasitology
Intestines/parasitology
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29441842
[Au] Autor:Benesh DP
[Ad] Address:Department of Evolutionary Ecology,Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Biology,August-Thienemann-Strasse 2,DE-24306 Plön,Germany.
[Ti] Title:Crowding in the first intermediate host does not affect infection probability in the second host in two helminths.
[So] Source:J Helminthol;:1-5, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1475-2697
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:When many worms co-infect the same host, their average size is often reduced. This negative density-dependent growth is called the crowding effect. Crowding has been reported many times for worms in their intermediate hosts, but rarely have the fitness consequences of crowding been examined. This study tested whether larval crowding reduces establishment success in the next host for two parasites with complex life cycles, the nematode Camallanus lacustris and the cestode Schistocephalus solidus. Infected copepods, the first host, were fed to sticklebacks, the second host. Fish received a constant dose, but the infection intensity in copepods was varied (e.g. giving two singly infected copepods or one doubly infected copepod). Worms from higher-intensity infections did not have significantly reduced infection success in fish. However, crowded treatments had a disproportionate number of low and high infection rates, and although this trend was not significant, it hints at the possibility that multiple worms within a copepod are more likely to either all infect or all die when transmitted to the next host. These results indicate that a smaller larval size due to crowding need not reduce the establishment probability of a worm in the next host.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0022149X1800007X

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[PMID]: 29386083
[Au] Autor:Binkiene R; Miliute A; Stunzenas V
[Ad] Address:Nature Research Centre,Akademijos 2,LT-08412 Vilnius,Lithuania.
[Ti] Title:Molecular data confirm the taxonomic position of Hymenolepis erinacei (Cyclophyllidea: Hymenolepididae) and host switching, with notes on cestodes of Palaearctic hedgehogs (Erinaceidae).
[So] Source:J Helminthol;:1-8, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1475-2697
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The cestode Hymenolepis erinacei is regarded as a widely distributed parasite in European hedgehogs of the genus Erinaceus, although the taxonomic position of this hymenolepidid has been debated for a considerable period of time. We present the first molecular data for this cestode, including partial DNA sequences of mitochondrial 16S and nuclear 28S ribosomal genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis clusters H. erinacei in one clade together with representatives of the genus Hymenolepis from rodents. Characteristic morphological features, including the oval embryophore without filaments and shape of the embryonic hooks of H. erinacei are described. Features of these cestode eggs are proposed as a basis for non-invasive detection of parasitic infections in small mammal populations. The present study explores phylogenetic relationships within the genus Hymenolepis and the host switching related to H. erinacei. Cases of host switching in other genera of the family Hymenolepididae are reviewed. A short critical review of cestodes parasitizing hedgehogs in the Palaearctic is presented.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0022149X18000056

  7 / 3433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29177582
[Au] Autor:Lagrue C; Presswell B; Dunckley N; Poulin R
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:The invasive cestode parasite Ligula from salmonids and bullies on the South Island, New Zealand.
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;117(1):151-156, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Freshwater ecosystems are often impacted by biological invasions, including the introduction of exotic parasites capable of infecting native species. Here, we report the occurrence of the introduced tapeworm Ligula sp. from common bully, Gobiomorphus cotidianus, and quinnat salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Lake Hawea, South Island, New Zealand. This parasite has a complex life cycle, reaching its adult stage in fish-eating birds. Worms recovered from the body cavity of fish hosts reached huge sizes (60-300 mm long); however, their low prevalence in fish populations suggests that infections are rare or localised. Molecular analysis (internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 and ITS2 sequences) confirms that these specimens belong to the genus Ligula and suggests tentative routes of invasion into New Zealand. Monitoring the spread of this parasite is important, as it can impact fish populations and also, when infection levels are high, those of piscivorous birds.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180105
[Lr] Last revision date:180105
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-017-5684-7

  8 / 3433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29211418
[Au] Autor:Anikieva LV; Ieshko EP; Ilmast NV
[Ti] Title:[NUMBER DISTRIBUTION AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF PROTEOCEPHALUS LONGICOLLIS (ZEDER, 1800) (CESTODA: PROTEOCEPHALIDEA), A PARASITE OF SMELT AND COREGONIDS].
[So] Source:Parazitologiia;50(4):291-302, 2016 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0031-1847
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The spatial structure and seasonal aspects in the number distribution of the cestode Proteocephalus longicollis population, maintained by trophic connections of specialized plankton-feeders (the vendace Coregonus albula L. and the smelt Osmerus eperlanus L.) in the Lake Onego were studied. Differences in the distribution of number of cestode population in host population, size-age structure, and pre-reproductive/reproductive stages ratio of the studied parasites were revealed. It was demonstrated that the spatial structure of P. longicollis was shaped by the specific characteristics of vendace and smelt populations in the Lake Onego. These species possess partially overlapping ecological niches and differences in the use of food resources, significantly determining the infection dynamics of the examined fish species.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cestoda/physiology
Cestode Infections/parasitology
Fish Diseases/parasitology
Lakes/parasitology
Osmeriformes/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cestoda/classification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171221
[Lr] Last revision date:171221
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 3433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29161459
[Au] Autor:Mourglia-Ettlin G; Miles S; Hernández A; Dematteis S
[Ad] Address:Área Inmunología, DEPBIO/IQB - Facultad de Química/Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República - Montevideo, Uruguay.
[Ti] Title:Ageing impairs parasite-specific antibody responses in cystic echinococcosis.
[So] Source:Parasite Immunol;, 2017 Nov 21.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3024
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Humoral immunity wanes during healthy ageing, increasing susceptibility to infections in the elderly. In this sense, information about parasite infections and human immunosenescence is scarce. Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an infectious disease caused by the larval stage of the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus, whose prevalence in humans shows an increase with host age. Susceptibility to human CE has been associated with humoral immunity to some extent; and therefore, we have here analyzed the influence of host age on the serological profile of young, middle-aged, and aged patients. Our results highlighted the detrimental influence of ageing on the intensity and quality of the anti-parasite antibody response. Remarkable differences in serological profiles between young and aged individuals were observed. In this sense, through Principal Components Analysis we identified aged patients as those exhibiting overall less intense antibody responses, mainly in isotypes/subclasses supposed to exert efficient anti-parasite activities (e.g. IgE and IgG1). Thus, these humoral defects could at least partially explain the reported increase in CE prevalence among older individuals, since a weaker immune response in the elderly might facilitate the establishment and maintenance of the parasite infection. Finally, a possible association between age-dependent susceptibility to CE and host immunosenescence is discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171121
[Lr] Last revision date:171121
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pim.12505

  10 / 3433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29160912
[Au] Autor:Garcia HH; Castillo Y; Gonzales I; Bustos JA; Saavedra H; Jacob L; Del Brutto OH; Wilkins PP; Gonzalez AE; Gilman RH; Cysticercosis Working Group in Peru.
[Ad] Address:Cysticercosis Unit, Department of Transmissible Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurologicas, Lima, Peru.
[Ti] Title:Low sensitivity and frequent cross-reactions in commercially available antibody-detection ELISA assays for Taenia solium cysticercosis.
[So] Source:Trop Med Int Health;, 2017 Nov 21.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3156
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of two commercially available ELISA kits, Novalisa and Ridascreen , for the detection of antibodies to Taenia solium, compared to serological diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NCC) by LLGP-EITB (electro immunotransfer blot assay using lentil-lectin purified glycoprotein antigens). METHODS: Archive serum samples from patients with viable NCC (n=45) or resolved, calcified NCC (n=45), as well as sera from patients with other cestode parasites (hymenolepiasis, n=45, and cystic hydatid disease, n=45), were evaluated for cysticercosis antibody detection using two ELISA kits, Novalisa and Ridascreen . All NCC samples had previously tested positive and all samples from heterologous infections were negative on LLGP-EITB for cysticercosis. Positive rates were calculated by kit and sample group and compared between the two kits. RESULTS: Compared to LLGP-EITB, the sensitivity of both ELISA assays to detect specific antibodies in patients with viable NCC was low (44.4% and 22.2%), and for calcified NCC it was only 6.7% and 4.5%. Sera from patients with cystic hydatid disease were highly cross-reactive in both ELISA assays (38/45, 84.4%; and 25/45, 55.6%). Sera from patients with hymenolepiasis cross-reacted in five cases in one of the assays (11.1%), and in only one sample with the second (2.2%). CONCLUSIONS: The performance of Novalisa and Ridascreen was poor. Antibody ELISA detection cannot not be recommended for the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171121
[Lr] Last revision date:171121
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tmi.13010


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