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Search on : Chlamydiaceae and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29417274
[Au] Autor:Chisu V; Foxi C; Tanda A; Masala G
[Ad] Address:Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Sardegna, Via Duca degli Abruzzi, 8, 07100, Sassari, Italy. valentinachisu@virgilio.it.
[Ti] Title:Molecular evidence of Chlamydiales in ticks from wild and domestic hosts in Sardinia, Italy.
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ticks are well known to be important vectors for a wide range of bacteria, viruses and protozoa affecting human and animal health. Ixodid ticks are widely distributed in Sardinia, and an increasing number of tick-borne bacteria have been documented in the island. A growing number of evidence are supporting the hypothesis of alternative transmission routes for chlamydial bacteria such as the involvement of vectors. This study was conducted to provide possible molecular detection of members belonging to the Chlamydiales order in Sardinian ticks and to update information concerning the presence of new ectoparasite-borne bacteria in ticks collected from domestic and wild hosts in a typical Mediterranean environment. A total of 378 ticks were individually screened with a pan-Chlamydiales specific primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Chlamydiales DNA was detected in 28% of the total ticks analyzed. The analyses of sequences highlighted that Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, Rhipicephalus bursa, Rhipicephalus annulatus, Haemaphysalis sulcata, Haemaphysalis punctata and Dermacentor marginatus ticks exhibited DNA of Chlamydiaceae and Parachlamydiaceae members. Our results revealed that DNA of zoonotic microorganisms such as C. psittaci, C. abortus and the emerging pathogen Parachlamydia acanthamoebae are present in Sardinian ticks. Since routes of Chlamydia transmission are yet to be fully defined, the role of ticks as possible vectors for Chlamydiales remains the most challenging and interesting question to be addressed in future research. Continued monitoring of these pathogens in tick vectors is needed to provide strategies for controlling of possible chlamydial infections and disease outbreaks in the island.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-018-5772-3

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[PMID]: 27773758
[Au] Autor:Reid F; Oakeshott P; Kerry SR; Hay PE; Jensen JS
[Ad] Address:Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, King's College London, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Chlamydia related bacteria (Chlamydiales) in early pregnancy: community-based cohort study.
[So] Source:Clin Microbiol Infect;23(2):119.e9-119.e14, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1469-0691
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Serological case-control studies suggest that certain chlamydia-related bacteria (Chlamydiales) which cause cows to abort may do the same in humans. Chlamydiales include Waddlia chondrophila, Chlamydia abortus and Chlamydia trachomatis. Data on prevalence of Chlamydiales in pregnancy are sparse. Using stored urine samples from a carefully characterised cohort of 847 newly pregnant women recruited from 37 general practices in London, UK, we aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of Chlamydiales infections. We also explored possible associations with miscarriage or spontaneous preterm birth. METHODS: Samples were tested using W. chondrophila and pan-Chlamydiales specific real-time PCRs targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Samples positive on either PCR were subjected to DNA sequencing and C. trachomatis PCR. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of Chlamydiales was 4.3% (36/847, 95% CI 3.0% to 5.8%). The prevalence of W. chondrophila was 0.6% (n = 5), C. trachomatis 1.7% (n = 14), and other Chlamydiales species 2.0% (n = 17). Infection with C. trachomatis was more common in women aged <25, of black ethnicity or with bacterial vaginosis, but this did not apply to W. chondrophila or other Chlamydiales. Follow up was 99.9% at 16 weeks gestation and 90% at term. No infection was significantly associated with miscarriage at ≤12 weeks (prevalence 10%, 81/827) or preterm birth <37 weeks (prevalence 4%, 23/628). Of 25 samples sequenced, seven (28%) were positive for Chlamydiales bacterium sequences associated with respiratory tract infections in children. CONCLUSION: In the first study to use the pan-Chlamydiales assay on female urine samples, 4% of pregnant women tested positive for Chlamydiales, including species known to be pathogenic in mothers and neonates.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chlamydia
Chlamydiaceae Infections/epidemiology
Chlamydiaceae Infections/microbiology
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chlamydia/classification
Chlamydia/genetics
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Premature Birth
Prevalence
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics
Risk Factors
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S)
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 180125
[Lr] Last revision date:180125
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29352599
[Au] Autor:Rojas MDC; Fort M; Bettermann S; Entrocassi C; Costamagna SR; Sachse K; Rodríguez Fermepin M
[Ad] Address:Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria, Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Anguil, Anguil, La Pampa, Argentina.
[Ti] Title:Detección de Chlamydia abortus en pérdidas reproductivas de bovinos en la provincia de La Pampa, Argentina. [Detection of Chlamydia abortus in bovine reproductive losses in the province of La Pampa, Argentina].
[So] Source:Rev Argent Microbiol;, 2018 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:0325-7541
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:Reproductive losses linked to an infectious etiology in bovine cattle are a major economic concern worldwide. In Argentina, more than 50% of abortion cases have unknown causes. Species belonging to Chlamydiaceae family are frequent etiologic agents of abortion around the world; however, there is yet no information on their prevalence in Argentina. The objective of this work was to identify Chlamydia spp., and particularly C. abortus in reproductive losses from bovine cattle in La Pampa, Argentina. Real time PCR targeting Chlamydiaceae-specific DNA fragments was performed on 251 samples obtained from bovine abortions and stillborns, and ArrayTube was used for species identification on positive samples. Chlamydiaceae DNA was detected in 12 samples of aborted fetuses (4.78%), 83.33% (10/12) accounting for abortions and 16.66% (2/12) for stillborns. C. abortus was detected by ArrayTube in 5 cases (1.99% of all samples, and 41.67% of Chlamydiaceae positive samples). This study shows the first detection of Chlamydiaceae and C. abortus DNA on reproductive losses of bovine cattle in Argentina, and the described prevalence value (4.78%) should be taken as baseline value due to the type of samples analyzed. Detection of genetic material from Chlamydiaceae not matching any of the studied species could be due to intraspecies variants or local species not yet described. Further research on Chlamydia infections in bovine cattle in Argentina is imperative to describe their range, to analyze their economic and zoonotic implications and to make recommendations about prevention and control measures.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180120
[Lr] Last revision date:180120
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 267 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29310550
[Au] Autor:Borel N; Polkinghorne A; Pospischil A
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Veterinary Pathology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:A Review on Chlamydial Diseases in Animals: Still a Challenge for Pathologists?
[So] Source:Vet Pathol;:300985817751218, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1544-2217
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chlamydiae have a worldwide distribution causing a wide range of diseases in human hosts, livestock, and companion animals as well as in wildlife and exotic species. Moreover, they can persist in their hosts as asymptomatic infections for extended periods of time. The introduction of molecular techniques has revolutionized the Chlamydia field by expanding the host range of known chlamydial species but also by discovering new species and even new families of bacteria in the broader order Chlamydiales. The wide range of hosts, diseases, and tissues affected by chlamydiae complicate the diagnosis such that standard diagnostic approaches for these bacteria are rare. Bacteria of the Chlamydiales order are small and their inclusions are difficult to detect by standard microscopy. With the exception of avian and ovine chlamydiosis, macroscopic and/or histologic changes might not be pathognomic or indicative for a chlamydial infection or even not present at all. Moreover, detection of chlamydial DNA in specimens in the absence of other methods or related pathological lesions questions the significance of such findings. The pathogenic potential of the majority of recently identified Chlamydia-related bacteria remains largely unknown and awaits investigation through experimental or natural infection models including histomorphological characterization of associated lesions. This review aims to summarize the historical background and the most important developments in the field of animal chlamydial research in the past 5 years with a special focus on pathology. It will summarize the current nomenclature, present critical thoughts about diagnostics, and give an update on chlamydial infections in domesticated animals such as livestock, companion animals and birds, as well as free-ranging and captive wild animals such as reptiles, fish, and marsupials.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180109
[Lr] Last revision date:180109
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0300985817751218

  5 / 267 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29292000
[Au] Autor:Del Río L; Murcia A; Buendía AJ; Álvarez D; Ortega N; Navarro JA; Salinas J; Caro MR
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Regional Campus of International Excellence Campus Mare Nostrum, Universidad de Murcia, Spain. Electronic address: laurario@um.es.
[Ti] Title:Development of an in vivo model of Chlamydia abortus chronic infection in mice overexpressing IL-10.
[So] Source:Vet Microbiol;213:28-34, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2542
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chlamydia abortus, like other members of the family Chlamydiaceae, have a unique intracellular developmental cycle that is characterized by its chronic nature. Infection of a flock can remain undetected for months, until abortion occurs the following reproductive season but, to date, neither the location nor the mechanisms that maintain this latent phase are fully understood. Studies have shown that IL-10 produced as a response to certain micro-organisms sustains the intracellular survival of pathogens and increases host susceptibility to chlamydial infections. In order to induce a sustained infection C. abortus, transgenic mice that constitutively express IL-10 were infected and the immunological mechanisms that maintain infection in these mice were compared with the mechanisms of a resistant wild-type mouse strain. Viable bacteria could be detected in different tissues of transgenic mice up to 28 days after infection, as analysed by bacterial isolation and immunohistochemistry. Chronic infection in these mice was associated with an impaired recruitment of macrophages, decreased iNOS activity at the site of infection and a more diffuse distribution of inflammatory cells in the liver. This murine model can be of great help for understanding the immunological and bacterial mechanisms that lead to chronic chlamydial infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180102
[Lr] Last revision date:180102
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 267 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29269129
[Au] Autor:Bayramova F; Jacquier N; Greub G
[Ad] Address:Centre for Research on Intracellular Bacteria, Institute of Microbiology, University Hospital Centre and University of Lausanne, Bugnon 48, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Insight in the biology of Chlamydia-related bacteria.
[So] Source:Microbes Infect;, 2017 Dec 18.
[Is] ISSN:1769-714X
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Chlamydiales order is composed of obligate intracellular bacteria and includes the Chlamydiaceae family and several family-level lineages called Chlamydia-related bacteria. In this review we will highlight the conserved and distinct biological features between these two groups. We will show how a better characterization of Chlamydia-related bacteria may increase our understanding on the Chlamydiales order evolution, and may help identifying new therapeutic targets to treat chlamydial infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171224
[Lr] Last revision date:171224
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 267 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28948060
[Au] Autor:Zigangirova NA; Morgunova EY; Fedina ED; Shevyagina NV; Borovaya TG; Zhukhovitsky VG; Kyle NH; Petyaev IM
[Ad] Address:Gamaleya Center of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Ministry of Health, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:Lycopene Inhibits Propagation of Chlamydia Infection.
[So] Source:Scientifica (Cairo);2017:1478625, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2090-908X
[Cp] Country of publication:Egypt
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chlamydiaceae is a family of obligate intracellular pathogenic bacteria with similar developmental cycles and cell biology responsible for a wide range of diseases in different hosts including genital and eye inflammatory diseases, arthritis, and inflammatory diseases of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. In the present paper, we report that lycopene, one of the main dietary carotenoids, which is present in tomato and some other fruits, has a strong inhibitory effect on and infections in alveolar macrophages. This finding was documented by both immunofluorescence analysis and electron microscopy. It was noted that lycopene treatment inhibited intracellular phase of the chlamydial developmental cycle and resulted in a significant loss of infectious progeny. The antichlamydial effect of lycopene was also confirmed in a clinical setting. There was a significant reduction of IgG antibodies against in the serum of volunteers treated for a month with oral ingestion of 7 mg of lycopene. Additional studies are needed to further explore the antichlamydial activity of lycopene and its possible effect on in relation to antichlamydial activity of lycopene to mechanisms of atherosclerosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171001
[Lr] Last revision date:171001
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/1478625

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[PMID]: 28765500
[Au] Autor:Fernández-Aguilar X; Rossi L; Cabezón Ó; Giorgino A; Victoriano Llopis I; Frey J; López-Olvera JR
[Ad] Address:Servei d'Ecopatologia de Fauna Salvatge, Departament de Medicina i Cirurgia Animals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Infectious keratoconjunctivitis and occurrence of and Chlamydiaceae in small domestic ruminants from Central Karakoram, Pakistan.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;181(9):237, 2017 Sep 02.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC) is a contagious eye disease primarily caused by in domestic and wild Caprinae. species have also been detected in ruminants with IKC. The objectives of this study are to investigate the ocular infection of and Chlamydiaceae and assess its interaction in relation to IKC in sheep and goats from remote communities around the Central Karakoram National Park in Pakistan, performing a combination of cross-sectional and case-control study design. Mostly asymptomatic and endemic infections of and Chlamydiaceae were found in sheep (19.3 per cent and 4.5 per cent, respectively) and goats (9.5 per cent and 1.9 per cent, respectively) from all communities, assessed by qPCR. Prevalence significantly differed between species only for (P=0.0184), which was also more prevalent in younger sheep (P<0.01). was identified by sequencing and was related with IKC only when coinfection with occurred, which suggest a synergic interaction. Cluster analysis of strains revealed higher diversity of strains than expected, evidenced interspecific transmission and suggested a higher local livestock trade than previously assumed. These results highlight the widespread occurrence of in sheep worldwide and its implications for wildlife should be assessed from a conservation perspective.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chlamydiaceae Infections/veterinary
Chlamydiaceae/isolation & purification
Goat Diseases/microbiology
Keratoconjunctivitis, Infectious/microbiology
Mycoplasma Infections/veterinary
Mycoplasma conjunctivae/isolation & purification
Sheep Diseases/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Case-Control Studies
Chlamydiaceae Infections/epidemiology
Chlamydiaceae Infections/microbiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Goat Diseases/epidemiology
Goats
Keratoconjunctivitis, Infectious/epidemiology
Male
Mycoplasma Infections/epidemiology
Mycoplasma Infections/microbiology
Pakistan/epidemiology
Sheep
Sheep Diseases/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171016
[Lr] Last revision date:171016
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170803
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.103948

  9 / 267 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28544656
[Au] Autor:Koch-Edelmann S; Banhart S; Saied EM; Rose L; Aeberhard L; Laue M; Doellinger J; Arenz C; Heuer D
[Ad] Address:Junior Research Group "Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Pathogens" (NG 5), Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany.
[Ti] Title:The cellular ceramide transport protein CERT promotes Chlamydia psittaci infection and controls bacterial sphingolipid uptake.
[So] Source:Cell Microbiol;19(10), 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1462-5822
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chlamydiaceae are bacterial pathogens that cause diverse diseases in humans and animals. Despite their broad host and tissue tropism, all Chlamydia species share an obligate intracellular cycle of development and have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to interact with their eukaryotic host cells. Here, we have analysed interactions of the zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia psittaci with a human epithelial cell line. We found that C. psittaci recruits the ceramide transport protein (CERT) to its inclusion. Chemical inhibition and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of CERT showed that CERT is a crucial factor for C. psittaci infections thereby affecting different stages of the infection including inclusion growth and infectious progeny formation. Interestingly, the uptake of fluorescently labelled sphingolipids in bacteria inside the inclusion was accelerated in CERT-knockout cells indicating that C. psittaci can exploit CERT-independent sphingolipid uptake pathways. Moreover, the CERT-specific inhibitor HPA-12 strongly diminished sphingolipid transport to inclusions of infected CERT-knockout cells, suggesting that other HPA-12-sensitive factors are involved in sphingolipid trafficking to C. psittaci. Further analysis is required to decipher these interactions and to understand their contributions to bacterial development, host range, tissue tropism, and disease outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170906
[Lr] Last revision date:170906
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/cmi.12752

  10 / 267 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28350846
[Au] Autor:Szymanska-Czerwinska M; Mitura A; Niemczuk K; Zareba K; Jodelko A; Pluta A; Scharf S; Vitek B; Aaziz R; Vorimore F; Laroucau K; Schnee C
[Ad] Address:Department of Cattle and Sheep Diseases, National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Dissemination and genetic diversity of chlamydial agents in Polish wildfowl: Isolation and molecular characterisation of avian Chlamydia abortus strains.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(3):e0174599, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Wild birds are considered as a reservoir for avian chlamydiosis posing a potential infectious threat to domestic poultry and humans. Analysis of 894 cloacal or fecal swabs from free-living birds in Poland revealed an overall Chlamydiaceae prevalence of 14.8% (n = 132) with the highest prevalence noted in Anatidae (19.7%) and Corvidae (13.4%). Further testing conducted with species-specific real-time PCR showed that 65 samples (49.2%) were positive for C. psittaci whereas only one was positive for C. avium. To classify the non-identified chlamydial agents and to genotype the C. psittaci and C. avium-positive samples, specimens were subjected to ompA-PCR and sequencing (n = 83). The ompA-based NJ dendrogram revealed that only 23 out of 83 sequences were assigned to C. psittaci, in particular to four clades representing the previously described C. psittaci genotypes B, C, Mat116 and 1V. Whereas the 59 remaining sequences were assigned to two new clades named G1 and G2, each one including sequences recently obtained from chlamydiae detected in Swedish wetland birds. G1 (18 samples from Anatidae and Rallidae) grouped closely together with genotype 1V and in relative proximity to several C. abortus isolates, and G2 (41 samples from Anatidae and Corvidae) grouped closely to C. psittaci strains of the classical ABE cluster, Matt116 and M56. Finally, deep molecular analysis of four representative isolates of genotypes 1V, G1 and G2 based on 16S rRNA, IGS and partial 23S rRNA sequences as well as MLST clearly classify these isolates within the C. abortus species. Consequently, we propose an expansion of the C. abortus species to include not only the classical isolates of mammalian origin, but also avian isolates so far referred to as atypical C. psittaci or C. psittaci/C. abortus intermediates.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Animals, Wild/microbiology
Bird Diseases/microbiology
Birds/microbiology
Chlamydia Infections/microbiology
Chlamydia/genetics
Genetic Variation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/genetics
Bird Diseases/epidemiology
Bird Diseases/transmission
Chlamydia/classification
Chlamydia/isolation & purification
Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections/transmission
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/genetics
Genotype
Geography
Phylogeny
Poland/epidemiology
Prevalence
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA/methods
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins); 0 (DNA, Ribosomal Spacer); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 23S); 149024-69-1 (OMPA outer membrane proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170831
[Lr] Last revision date:170831
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170329
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0174599


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