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[PMID]: 29364047
[Au] Autor:Suh KS; Choi EM; Jung WW; Park SY; Chin SO; Rhee SY; Pak YK; Chon S
[Ad] Address:a Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism , School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University , Seoul , Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:27-Deoxyactein prevents 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced cellular damage in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells.
[So] Source:J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng;:1-10, 2018 Jan 24.
[Is] ISSN:1532-4117
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a well-known environmental contaminant that exerts its toxicity through a variety of signaling mechanisms. The present study evaluated the effects of 27-deoxyactein, one of the major constituents isolated from Cimicifuga racemosa, on TCDD-induced toxicity in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. TCDD reduced cell survival, markedly increased apoptosis, and enhanced autophagy activity. However, pre-treatment with 27-deoxyactein attenuated all TCDD-induced effects and significantly decreased intracellular calcium (Ca ) concentrations, the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cardiolipin peroxidation compared to the TCDD-treated controls. Additionally, TCDD-induced increases in the levels of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were significantly inhibited by 27-deoxyactein. The mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ERK1, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) were also effectively restored by pre-treatment with 27-deoxyactein. Furthermore, 27-deoxyactein significantly increased the expressions of genes associated with osteoblast differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osterix. Taken together, the present findings demonstrate the preventive effects of 27-deoxyactein on TCDD-induced damage in osteoblasts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180124
[Lr] Last revision date:180124
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/10934529.2018.1428275

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[PMID]: 29198157
[Au] Autor:Gao L; Zheng T; Xue W; Wang Y; Deng Y; Zuo H; Sun A
[Ad] Address:a Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences , Beijing , China.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and safety evaluation of Cimicifuga foetida extract in menopausal women.
[So] Source:Climacteric;21(1):69-74, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1473-0804
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term treatment with Cimicifuga foetida extract in menopausal women. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted. A total of 96 early postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to three groups: group A received 1 mg estradiol valerate daily plus 4 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate on days 19-30; group B received 1 mg estradiol valerate daily plus 100 mg micronized progesterone on days 19-30; group C received 100 mg C. foetida extract daily. The efficacy was evaluated. Safety parameters were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 81 patients completed the treatment and follow-up visit. The modified Kupperman Menopausal Index scores decreased after 3 months in all groups. No significant changes were observed in the liver, renal function and components of metabolic syndrome in group C (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences in the incidences of metabolic syndrome among the three groups (p > 0.05). After 24 months, the endometrial thickness increased significantly in group B (p = 0.014), but not in the C. foetida extract group (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: C. foetida extract is safe and effective for the treatment of menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180101
[Lr] Last revision date:180101
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/13697137.2017.1406913

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[PMID]: 29156528
[Au] Autor:Chen HJ; Liu J
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Laboratory of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Translational Neuroscience Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China.
[Ti] Title:Actein ameliorates hepatic steatosis and fibrosis in high fat diet-induced NAFLD by regulation of insulin and leptin resistant.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;97:1386-1396, 2017 Nov 15.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Insulin and leptin resistance are highly involved in metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Presently, no approved treatment is available. Actein is isolated from the rthizomes of Cimicifuga foetida, a triterpene glycoside, exhibiting important biological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and anti-oxidant activity. However, its effects on metabolic syndrome are poorly understood. The aims of the study were mainly to investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating insulin and leptin resistance, and lipogenic action of actein in high fat diet-fed mice. Our data indicated that actein-treated mice displayed lower body weight, epididymal and subcutaneous fat mass, as well as serum lipid levels. Also, improved insulin and leptin resistance were observed in actein-treated groups. Liver inflammation and fibrosis triggered by high fat diet were decreased for actein administration. Moreover, hepatic lipid accumulation was also reduced by actein along with reductions of hepatic de novo lipogenesis-linked signals in actein-treated rodents with high fat diet. High fat diet-induced activation of insulin receptor substrate 1/Forkhead box protein O1 (IRS1/FOXO1), Janus kinase 2 gene/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK2/STAT3) and Protein Kinase B/Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (AKT/GSK3ß) pathways in liver was inhibited by actein, a potential mechanism by which hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptindemia and dyslipidemia were attenuated. Thus, the findings above might be of nutritional and therapeutic importance for the treatment of NAFLD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171121
[Lr] Last revision date:171121
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29039493
[Au] Autor:Zhou WD; Wang X; Sun XZ; Hu J; Zhang RR; Hong Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Huai'an First People's Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Huai'an, Jiangsu 223300, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:Actein induces apoptosis in leukemia cells through suppressing RhoA/ROCK1 signaling pathway.
[So] Source:Int J Oncol;51(6):1831-1841, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1791-2423
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Actein is a tetracyclic triterpenoid compound, extracted from the rhizome of Cimicifuga foetida, exhibiting anticancer activities as previously reported. However, the effects of actein on human leukemia have not been explored before. In this study, the role of actein in regulating apoptosis induction in human leukemia cells was investigated. Actein administration significantly enhanced apoptosis, especially in human leukemia cell line of U937 and the primary human leukemia cells. The promotion was accompanied by caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and cytochrome c (Cyto-c) release. Additionally, translocation of Bax into mitochondria was increased by actein, while anti-apoptotic signals of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) and B cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were decreased, accompanied by reduced phosphorylated Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad). Furthermore, protein kinase B (AKT) activation was downregulated by actein treatment in U937 cells. RhoA, but not caspase-3, regulated Rho kinase 1 (ROCK1) expression induced by actein. Suppression of RhoA and ROCK1 reduced ROCK1 expression, caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. In contrast, AKT inactivity enhanced apoptosis levels, as well as caspase signaling pathway expression. The anticancer role of actein was potentiated by inactivating AKT. In vivo, U937-bearing tumor growth was suppressed by actein, which was related to ROCK1 suppression, AKT dephosphorylation and apoptosis induction. These results indicated that actein has a suppressive role in human leukemia progression through inactivating RhoA/ROCK1 and inducing caspases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171109
[Lr] Last revision date:171109
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/ijo.2017.4150

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[PMID]: 28827038
[Au] Autor:Disch L; Forsch K; Siewert B; Drewe J; Fricker G
[Ad] Address:Max Zeller Söhne AG, CH-8590 Romanshorn, Switzerland; Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Pharmacology, Ruprecht-Karls-University, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:In Vitro and In Situ Characterization of Triterpene Glycosides From Cimicifuga racemosa Extract.
[So] Source:J Pharm Sci;106(12):3642-3650, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6017
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cimicifuga racemosa products are widely used in the treatment of climacteric symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate C racemosa extract Ze 450 according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Triterpene glycosides served as analytical marker and were evaluated for solubility and absorption properties. pH-dependent thermodynamic solubility was tested via shake flask method, and dissolution performance of a herbal medicinal product containing C racemosa extract Ze 450 was assessed. Absorption was estimated by in vitro permeation through Caco-2 monolayers. Furthermore, different intestinal segments were screened for absorption performance using an in situ rat model. Over a physiological pH range, triterpene glycosides exhibited pH-dependent solubility with highest concentration at pH 7.5. Dissolution profiles showed rapid dissolution of actein and 23-epi-26-deoxyactein. Furthermore, 23-epi-26-deoxyactein as surrogate for contained triterpene glycosides showed a high permeability through Caco-2 monolayers. Results of in situ rat model showed absorption capacity for 23-epi-26-deoxyactein in duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon. The results indicate high bioavailability of triterpene glycosides from C racemosa extract Ze 450. With regard to BCS, triterpene glycosides can be classified into BCS class I (high solubility, high permeability).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171113
[Lr] Last revision date:171113
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28826891
[Au] Autor:Guo Y; Yin T; Wang X; Zhang F; Pan G; Lv H; Wang X; Owoicho Orgah J; Zhu Y; Wu H
[Ad] Address:Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, PR China; Tianjin International Joint Academy of Biomedicine, Tianjin 300457, PR China. Electronic address: guoyaqing1012@foxmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of the genus Cimicifuga: A review.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;209:264-282, 2017 Sep 14.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Plants of the genus Cimicifuga have long been used as an ethnomedicine in China, Europe, and North America for its high medicinal value and health benefits. Their dried rhizomes are widely used for treating wind-heat headache, toothache, aphtha, sore throat, measles, spot poison, archoptosis, and uterine prolapse. In addition, it is used as a dietary supplement for preventing women menopausal symptoms and osteoporosis. AIM OF THE REVIEW: This paper aims to provide up-to-date information on the genus Cimicifuga, including botanical characterization, medicinal resources, traditional medicinal uses, phytochemistry, quality control, pharmacological research as well as the toxicology. The possible structural-activity relationships and molecular mechanisms of the bioactive constituents are discussed in ways that contribute to the structural optimization and preclinical safety assessment for further drug design. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The relevant information on Cimicifuga was collected from scientific databases (such as Google Scholar, PubMed, SciFinder Scholar, Science Direct, CNKI, Baidu Scholar, Web of Science, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database), Chinese herbal classics, ethnobotanical books, PhD and MSc dissertations, Chinese Pharmacopoeia, published articles in peer-reviewed journals, local magazines, and unpublished materials. In addition, the Plant List (TPL, www.theplantlist.org) was also used to validate the scientific names and synonyms of this plant. The literature cited in this review dated from 1953 to 2017. RESULTS: The majority of chemical constituents of this plant include triterpenoid glycosides, phenylpropanoids, nitrogenous compounds, chromones, flavonoids and 4α-methyl steroid. Among them, the primary bioactive constituents are believed to be present in the triterpene glycoside fraction. To date, investigation of seven Cimicifuga spp. plants led to the identification of more than 457 compounds. Years of pharmacological research proved that the crude extracts and certain pure compounds obtained from Cimicifuga exhibited menopausal syndrome-treatment, anti-osteoporosis, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidant and antiangiogenic activities. On the other hand, Cimicifuga plant-induced toxicities of liver, cardiovascular, central and peripheral nervous systems have also been reported. Therefore, safety consideration should be placed into a high priority for herbal medicine Cimicifuga therapy in the early stages of development and clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS: This review presents information on botany, medicinal resources, and traditional medicinal history of some Cimicifuga plants. Modern pharmacology researchers have validated many traditional uses of Cimicifuga species. As the quality control and safety assessment of Cimicifuga plants is still incomplete, only a small part of the plant is permitted to be used as medicines. Expansion of medicinal resources in Cimicifuga is urgently needed to enable its full use. Currently research primarily focuses on the triterpenoid glycosides but there are many other types of compounds which may possess new biological activities however the systematic studies of these compounds are lacking. Extensive study is required on Cimicifuga plant before it can be fully used in clinics as a potent drug candidate.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170828
[Lr] Last revision date:170828
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28780985
[Au] Autor:Su Y; Wu L; Mu G; Wang Q; Yang B; Cheng G; Kuang H
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Chinese Material Medica, Department of Pharmacology, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Harbin, PR China; Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: suyanggo@163.com.
[Ti] Title:9,19-Cycloartenol glycoside G3 from Cimicifuga simplex regulates immune responses by modulating Th17/Treg ratio.
[So] Source:Bioorg Med Chem;25(17):4917-4923, 2017 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3391
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cimicifuga simplex is a medicinal herb which has a wide range of biological activities. We isolated seven 9,19-cycloartenol glycosides from the roots of C. simplex, and among the glycosides, G3 exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect on immune responses, including suppressing the differentiation of CD T cells and directly suppressing the cytokine-induced JAK/STAT signaling pathways. In the IL-23-induced mouse ear model of skin disease, G3 repressed disease development by inhibiting the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in murine ear skin. Moreover, G3 affected the maturation of DCs in vitro, thereby inducing T cell differentiation, resulting in an increased Treg phenotype and decreased Th17 phenotype. This study provides new evidence that G3 might ameliorate chronic inflammatory skin diseases by suppressing pathogenic CD T cell differentiation and the IL-17 RORγt /IL-10 FoxP3 ratio. These findings suggest that G3 might mediate the therapeutic effects observed in psoriasis patients following treatment with C. simplex.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cimicifuga/chemistry
Glycosides/chemistry
Glycosides/pharmacology
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/cytology
Th17 Cells/cytology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
Cell Differentiation/drug effects
Cell Proliferation/drug effects
Cimicifuga/metabolism
Cytokines/pharmacology
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Forkhead Transcription Factors/metabolism
Glycosides/therapeutic use
Interleukin-17/metabolism
Mice
Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 3/metabolism
Plant Roots/chemistry
Plant Roots/metabolism
Signal Transduction/drug effects
Skin Diseases/drug therapy
Skin Diseases/pathology
Spleen/cytology
Spleen/drug effects
Spleen/metabolism
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/drug effects
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism
Th17 Cells/drug effects
Th17 Cells/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cytokines); 0 (Forkhead Transcription Factors); 0 (Foxp3 protein, mouse); 0 (Glycosides); 0 (Interleukin-17); 0 (Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 3)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170926
[Lr] Last revision date:170926
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170808
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 640 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28703650
[Au] Autor:Cobin RH; Goodman NF; AACE Reproductive Endocrinology Scientific Committee
[Ti] Title:AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY POSITION STATEMENT ON MENOPAUSE-2017 UPDATE.
[So] Source:Endocr Pract;23(7):869-880, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1530-891X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)/American College of Endocrinology (ACE) Position Statement is designed to update the previous menopause clinical practice guidelines published in 2011 but does not replace them. The current document reviews new clinical trials published since then as well as new information regarding possible risks and benefits of therapies available for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. AACE reinforces the recommendations made in its previous guidelines and provides additional recommendations on the basis of new data. A summary regarding this position statement is listed below: New information available from randomized clinical trials and epidemiologic studies reported after 2011 was critically reviewed. No previous recommendations from the 2011 menopause clinical practice guidelines have been reversed or changed. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. Newer information enhances AACE's guidance for the use of hormone therapy in different subsets of women. Newer information helps to support the use of various types of estrogens, SERMs, and progesterone, as well as the route of delivery. Newer information supports the previous recommendation against the use of bioidentical hormones. The use of nonhormonal therapies for the symptomatic relief of menopausal symptoms is supported. New recommendations in this position statement include: 1. RECOMMENDATION: the use of menopausal hormone therapy in symptomatic postmenopausal women should be based on consideration of all risk factors for cardiovascular disease, age, and time from menopause. 2. RECOMMENDATION: the use of transdermal as compared with oral estrogen preparations may be considered less likely to produce thrombotic risk and perhaps the risk of stroke and coronary artery disease. 3. RECOMMENDATION: when the use of progesterone is necessary, micronized progesterone is considered the safer alternative. 4. RECOMMENDATION: in symptomatic menopausal women who are at significant risk from the use of hormone replacement therapy, the use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and possibly other nonhormonal agents may offer significant symptom relief. 5. RECOMMENDATION: AACE does not recommend use of bioidentical hormone therapy. 6. RECOMMENDATION: AACE fully supports the recommendations of the Comité de l'Évolution des Pratiques en Oncologie regarding the management of menopause in women with breast cancer. 7. RECOMMENDATION: HRT is not recommended for the prevention of diabetes. 8. RECOMMENDATION: In women with previously diagnosed diabetes, the use of HRT should be individualized, taking in to account age, metabolic, and cardiovascular risk factors. ABBREVIATIONS: AACE = American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; ACE = American College of Endocrinology; BMI = body mass index; CAC = coronary artery calcification; CEE = conjugated equine estrogen; CEPO = Comité de l'Évolution des Pratiques en Oncologie; CAD = coronary artery disease; CIMT = carotid intima media thickness; CVD = cardiovascular disease; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; HDL = high-density lipoprotein; HRT = hormone replacement therapy; HT = hypertension; KEEPS = Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MBS = metabolic syndrome; MPA = medroxyprogesterone acetate; RR = relative risk; SERM = selective estrogen-receptor modulator; SSRI = selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor; VTE = venous thrombo-embolism; WHI = Women's Health Initiative.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Estrogen Replacement Therapy/methods
Menopause
Osteoporosis/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Administration, Cutaneous
Administration, Oral
Aged
Amines/therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology
Cimicifuga
Cognition
Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids/therapeutic use
Diabetes Mellitus
Endocrinology
Estradiol/therapeutic use
Estrogens/therapeutic use
Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists/therapeutic use
Female
Hot Flashes
Humans
Middle Aged
Phytoestrogens/therapeutic use
Phytotherapy
Progesterone/therapeutic use
Progestins/therapeutic use
Risk Assessment
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/therapeutic use
Societies, Medical
Thrombosis/epidemiology
Vasomotor System
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; PRACTICE GUIDELINE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Amines); 0 (Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids); 0 (Estrogens); 0 (Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists); 0 (Phytoestrogens); 0 (Progestins); 0 (Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors); 4G7DS2Q64Y (Progesterone); 4TI98Z838E (Estradiol); 56-12-2 (gamma-Aminobutyric Acid); 6CW7F3G59X (gabapentin)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170912
[Lr] Last revision date:170912
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170714
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4158/EP171828.PS

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[PMID]: 28651983
[Au] Autor:Lv C; Yang F; Qin R; Qi Z; Zhou W; Lu J
[Ad] Address:School of Traditional Chinese Materia Medica, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110006, China.
[Ti] Title:Bioactivity-guided isolation of chemical constituents against H O -induced neurotoxicity on PC12 from Cimicifuga dahurica (Turcz.) Maxim.
[So] Source:Bioorg Med Chem Lett;27(15):3305-3309, 2017 08 01.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3405
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Three new compounds (1, 6, 9), with six known compounds (2-5, 7-8) were obtained from water-soluble extract of Cimicifuga dahurica (Turcz.) Maxim. by bioactivity-guided isolation. Their structures were elucidated by chemical and spectral analysis, including 1D, 2D NMR data and HRESIMS. H O -induced neurotoxicity on PC12 cells model were conducted to evaluate the neuro-protective capability of these compounds. The piscidic acid derivatives compounds 4-7 showed marked neuro-protective effect at certain concentration.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cimicifuga/chemistry
Neurons/drug effects
Neuroprotective Agents/chemistry
Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology
Triterpenes/chemistry
Triterpenes/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cell Survival/drug effects
Hydrogen Peroxide/metabolism
Hydroxybenzoates/chemistry
Hydroxybenzoates/isolation & purification
Hydroxybenzoates/pharmacology
Neurons/cytology
Neurons/metabolism
Neuroprotective Agents/isolation & purification
PC12 Cells
Rats
Triterpenes/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Hydroxybenzoates); 0 (Neuroprotective Agents); 0 (Triterpenes); 511BQ884F7 (piscidic acid); BBX060AN9V (Hydrogen Peroxide)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171125
[Lr] Last revision date:171125
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170628
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 640 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28627583
[Au] Autor:Suh KS; Choi EM; Jung WW; Kim YJ; Hong SM; Park SY; Rhee SY; Chon S
[Ad] Address:Research Institute of Endocrinology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul 130-702, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Deoxyactein protects pancreatic ß-cells against methylglyoxal-induced oxidative cell damage by the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.
[So] Source:Int J Mol Med;40(2):539-548, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1791-244X
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Methylglyoxal (MG) is one of the major precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are considered to be one of the causes of diabetes and its complications. The root and rhizomes of black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) have long been used medicinally, and deoxyactein is one of its major constituents. In the present study, the protective effects of deoxyactein against MG-induced oxidative cell damage were investigated in insulin-producing pancreatic ß-cells. We found that deoxyactein protected the pancreatic ß-cells against MG-induced cell death. Pre-treatment with deoxyactein significantly reduced the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), cardiolipin peroxidation, and protein adduct accumulation induced by MG. Pre-treatment of the cells with deoxyactein restored glyoxalase I activity and insulin secretion which were reduced by MG, and increased the mRNA expression of insulin 2 (INS2) and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein-1 (PDX-1). It also increased the levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Furthermore, treatment with deoxyactein increased the levels of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α). These findings indicate that deoxyactein may exert beneficial effects on pancreatic ß-cells via the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Taken together, these results suggest that deoxyactein may be used for the prevention of pancreatic ß-cell damage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170717
[Lr] Last revision date:170717
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/ijmm.2017.3018


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