Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Coccidioidomycosis [Words]
References found : 2658 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 266 go to page                         

  1 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29185961
[Au] Autor:Galli M; Antinori S; Atzeni F; Meroni L; Riva A; Scirè C; Adorni F; Quartuccio L; Sebastiani M; Airò P; Bazzichi L; Cristini F; Del Bono V; Manfredi A; Viapiana O; De Rosa F; Favalli E; Petrelli E; Salvarani C; Govoni M; Corcione S; Scrivo R; Sarmati L; Lazzarin A; Grassi W; Mastroianni C; Gaeta GB; Ferraccioli G; Cutolo M; De Vita S; Lapadula G; Matucci-Cerinic M; Armignacco O; Sarzi-Puttini P
[Ad] Address:Clinica delle Malattie Infettive, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, University of Milan, Italy. massimo.galli@unimi.it.
[Ti] Title:Recommendations for the management of pulmonary fungal infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
[So] Source:Clin Exp Rheumatol;35(6):1018-1028, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0392-856X
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Often life-threatening pulmonary fungal infections (PFIs) can occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) receiving disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Most of the data concerning PFIs in RA patients come from case reports and retrospective case series. Of the ve most widely described PFIs, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) has rarely been seen outside Japan, pulmonary cryptococcosis has been diagnosed in only a small number of patients worldwide, pulmonary coccidioidomycosis has almost only been observed in endemic areas, the limited number of cases of pulmonary histoplasmosis have mainly occurred in the USA, and the rare cases of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis have only been encountered in leukopenic patients. Many aspects of the prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of PFIs in RA patients remain to be defined, as does the role of each DMARD in increasing the risk of infection, and the possibility of resuming biological and non-biological DMARD treatment after the infection has been cured. The recommendations for the management of PFIs described in this paper are the product of a consensus procedure promoted by the Italian group for the Study and Management of Infections in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases (the ISMIR group).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications
Lung Diseases, Fungal/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antirheumatic Agents/adverse effects
Coccidioidomycosis/drug therapy
Cryptococcosis/drug therapy
Histoplasmosis/drug therapy
Humans
Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/drug therapy
Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antirheumatic Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29460741
[Au] Autor:Freedman M; Jackson BR; McCotter O; Benedict K
[Ti] Title:Coccidioidomycosis Outbreaks, United States and Worldwide, 1940-2015.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;24(3):417-423, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Coccidioidomycosis causes substantial illness and death in the United States each year. Although most cases are sporadic, outbreaks provide insight into the clinical and environmental features of coccidioidomycosis, high-risk activities, and the geographic range of Coccidioides fungi. We identified reports published in English of 47 coccidioidomycosis outbreaks worldwide that resulted in 1,464 cases during 1940-2015. Most (85%) outbreaks were associated with environmental exposures; the 2 largest outbreaks resulted from an earthquake and a large dust storm. More than one third of outbreaks occurred in areas where the fungus was not previously known to be endemic, and more than half of outbreaks involved occupational exposures. Coccidioidomycosis outbreaks can be difficult to detect and challenging to prevent given the unknown effectiveness of environmental control methods and personal protective equipment; therefore, increased awareness of coccidioidomycosis outbreaks is needed among public health professionals, healthcare providers, and the public.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2403.170623

  3 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29447170
[Au] Autor:Molina-Morant D; Sánchez-Montalvá A; Salvador F; Sao-Avilés A; Molina I
[Ad] Address:Tropical Medicine Unit, Infectious Diseases Department. PROSICS Barcelona (International Health Program of the Catalan Health Institute), Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Imported endemic mycoses in Spain: Evolution of hospitalized cases, clinical characteristics and correlation with migratory movements, 1997-2014.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(2):e0006245, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Endemic mycoses are systemic fungal infections. Histoplasmosis is endemic in all temperate areas of the world; coccidioidomycosis and paracoccidioidomycosis are only present in the American continent. These pathogens are not present in Spain, but in the last years there has been an increase of reported cases due to migration and temporary movements. We obtained from the Spanish hospitals records clinical and demographic data of all hospitalized cases between 1997 and 2014. There were 286 cases of histoplasmosis, 94 of Coccidioidomycosis and 25 of paracoccidioidomycosis. Overall, histoplasmosis was strongly related to HIV infection, as well as with greater morbidity and mortality. For the other mycoses, we did not find any immunosuppressive condition in most of the cases. Although we were not able to obtain data about clinical presentation of all the cases, the most frequently found was pulmonary involvement. We also found a temporal correlation between the Spanish population born in endemic countries and the number of hospitalized cases along this period. This study reflects the importance of imported diseases in non-endemic countries due to migratory movements.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006245

  4 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29383771
[Au] Autor:Liang G; Shen Y; Lv G; Zheng H; Mei H; Zheng X; Kong X; Blechert O; Li D; Liu W
[Ad] Address:Department of Mycology, Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Nanjing, China.
[Ti] Title:Coccidioidomycosis: Imported and possible domestic cases in China: A case report and review, 1958-2017.
[So] Source:Mycoses;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0507
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report a case of imported pulmonary coccidioidomycosis caused by Coccidioides posadasii in a patient who was misdiagnosed as tuberculosis and mistreated with antituberculosis medications for 18 months. The symptoms were not relieved until antifungal treatment was started. An extensive review of the coccidioidomycosis cases occurring in China reveals 38 cases, 16 of which had no associated history of travel to any traditional endemic areas. We speculate that some factors may drive Coccidioides spp. transference to China, which then causes those domestic infections. Moreover, we indicate the first, to the best of our knowledge, possible endemic areas in China.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/myc.12750

  5 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29437615
[Au] Autor:Wiederhold NP; Shubitz LF; Najvar LK; Jaramillo R; Olivo M; Catano G; Trinh HT; Yates CM; Schotzinger RJ; Garvey EP; Patterson TF
[Ad] Address:University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX wiederholdn@uthscsa.edu.
[Ti] Title:The Novel Fungal Cyp51 Inhibitor VT-1598 is Efficacious in Experimental Models of Central Nervous System Coccidioidomycosis Caused by and .
[So] Source:Antimicrob Agents Chemother;, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1098-6596
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Coccidioidal meningitis can cause significant morbidity, and lifelong antifungal therapy is often required. VT-1598 is a fungal-specific Cyp51 inhibitor that has potent activity against species. We evaluated the efficacy of VT-1598 in murine models of CNS coccidioidomycosis caused and Infection was introduced via intracranial inoculation, and therapy began 48 hours post-inoculation. Oral treatments consisted of vehicle control, VT-1598, and positive controls of fluconazole in the study and VT-1161 in the study. Treatment continued for 7 and 14 days in the fungal burden and survival studies, respectively. Fungal burden was assessed in brain tissue collected 24 to 48 hours post-treatment in the fungal burden studies, and on the days the mice succumbed to infection or at the pre-specified endpoints in the survival studies. VT-1598 plasma concentrations were also measured in the study. VT-1598 resulted in significant improvements in survival in mice infected with either species. In addition, fungal burden was significantly reduced in the fungal burden studies. Plasma concentrations 48 hours after dosing stopped remained above the VT-1598 MIC against the isolate, although levels were undetectable in the survival study after a 4-week wash-out. Whereas fungal burden remained suppressed after a 2-week wash-out in the model, higher fungal burden was observed in the survival arm of the model. This efficacy supports human studies to establish the utility of VT-1598 for the treatment of coccidioidomycosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29426026
[Au] Autor:Schweitzer MD; Calzadilla AS; Salamo O; Sharifi A; Kumar N; Holt G; Campos M; Mirsaeidi M
[Ad] Address:Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States.
[Ti] Title:Lung health in era of climate change and dust storms.
[So] Source:Environ Res;163:36-42, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0953
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dust storms are strong winds which lead to particle exposure over extensive areas. These storms influence air quality on both a local and global scale which lead to both short and long-term effects. The frequency of dust storms has been on the rise during the last decade. Forecasts suggest that their incidence will increase as a response to the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activities. Elderly people, young children, and individuals with chronic cardiopulmonary diseases are at the greatest risk for health effects of dust storms. A wide variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases have been associated with dust exposure. Influenza A virus, pulmonary coccidioidomycosis, bacterial pneumonia, and meningococcal meningitis are a few examples of dust-related infectious diseases. Among non-infectious diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, sarcoidosis and pulmonary fibrosis have been associated with dust contact. Here, we review two molecular mechanisms of dust induced lung disease for asthma and sarcoidosis. We can also then further understand the mechanisms by which dust particles disturb airway epithelial and immune cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29212702
[Au] Autor:Saubolle MA; Wojack BR; Wertheimer AM; Fuayagem AZ; Young S; Koeneman BA
[Ad] Address:Laboratory Sciences of Arizona/Sonora Quest Laboratories, Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix, University of Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona, USA Mike.Saubolle@bannerhealth.com.
[Ti] Title:Multicenter Clinical Validation of a Cartridge-Based Real-Time PCR System for Detection of Coccidioides spp. in Lower Respiratory Specimens.
[So] Source:J Clin Microbiol;56(2), 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1098-660X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Available methods for the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis have significant shortcomings relative to accuracy and timeliness. We retrospectively and prospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance and reproducibility of a new cartridge-based real-time PCR assay for spp. directly in lower respiratory secretions and compared them to today's "gold standard," fungal culture. The GeneSTAT assay uses a 106-bp target sequence repeated multiple times (∼60×) per genome, thus lowering the limit of detection (LOD) for extracted DNA to 10 genome equivalents/ml. A total of 332 prospective and retrospective individual patient specimens were tested. The retrospective samples consisted of 100 bronchoalveolar lavage or bronchial wash (BAL/BW) (51 positive and 49 negative by culture) specimens that had been collected previously and stored at -70°C. These samples were tested by the GeneSTAT assay across three clinical test sites. The sensitivity was 100%, and the specificity ranged between 93.8% and 100%. There was minimal variance in the percent agreement across the three sites, 95.6% to 100%. Additionally, a total of 232 fresh (prospective) deidentified BAL/BW specimens were tested across the three clinical sites, which included a number of specimens from Southern California to provide a diversity of isolates. Specimens were tested by fungal culture, with any isolates of , except for one, being confirmed by molecular means (AccuProbe). The sensitivity of the GeneSTAT assay across the three sites was 100% (4/4) for positive fresh specimens, and the overall specificity of the assay was 99.6% (227/228), ranging from 98.1% to 100%. In testing for cross-reactivity, the assay was 100% specific when screened against 47 different bacterial, viral, and fungal species.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180208
[Lr] Last revision date:180208
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29244019
[Au] Autor:Charalambous LT; Premji A; Tybout C; Hunt A; Cutshaw D; Elsamadicy AA; Yang S; Xie J; Giamberardino C; Pagadala P; Perfect JR; Lad SP
[Ad] Address:1​Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, NC, USA.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence, healthcare resource utilization and overall burden of fungal meningitis in the United States.
[So] Source:J Med Microbiol;67(2):215-227, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1473-5644
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Previous epidemiological and cost studies of fungal meningitis have largely focused on single pathogens, leading to a poor understanding of the disease in general. We studied the largest and most diverse group of fungal meningitis patients to date, over the longest follow-up period, to examine the broad impact on resource utilization within the United States. METHODOLOGY: The Truven Health Analytics MarketScan database was used to identify patients with a fungal meningitis diagnosis in the United States between 2000 and 2012. Patients with a primary diagnosis of cryptococcal, Coccidioides, Histoplasma, or Candida meningitis were included in the analysis. Data concerning healthcare resource utilization, prevalence and length of stay were collected for up to 5 years following the original diagnosis. RESULTS: Cryptococcal meningitis was the most prevalent type of fungal meningitis (70.1 % of cases over the duration of the study), followed by coccidioidomycosis (16.4 %), histoplasmosis (6.0 %) and candidiasis (7.6 %). Cryptococcal meningitis and candidiasis patients accrued the largest average charges ($103 236 and $103 803, respectively) and spent the most time in the hospital on average (70.6 and 79 days). Coccidioidomycosis and histoplasmosis patients also accrued substantial charges and time in the hospital ($82 439, 48.1 days; $78 609, 49.8 days, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our study characterizes the largest longitudinal cohort of fungal meningitis in the United States. Importantly, the health economic impact and long-term morbidity from these infections are quantified and reviewed. The healthcare resource utilization of fungal meningitis patients in the United States is substantial.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cost of Illness
Health Resources/utilization
Meningitis, Fungal/epidemiology
Meningitis, Fungal/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Candidiasis/economics
Candidiasis/epidemiology
Candidiasis/microbiology
Coccidioidomycosis/economics
Coccidioidomycosis/epidemiology
Coccidioidomycosis/microbiology
Female
Histoplasmosis/economics
Histoplasmosis/epidemiology
Histoplasmosis/microbiology
Humans
Male
Meningitis, Cryptococcal/economics
Meningitis, Cryptococcal/epidemiology
Meningitis, Cryptococcal/microbiology
Meningitis, Fungal/diagnosis
Meningitis, Fungal/economics
Middle Aged
Prevalence
United States/epidemiology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1099/jmm.0.000656

  9 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29374638
[Au] Autor:Moloney DP; Chawke L; Crowley MT; O'Connor TM
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Medicine, Mercy University Hospital, Cork, Munster, Ireland.
[Ti] Title:Fluctuating hypercalcaemia caused by cavitary pulmonary infection.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Jan 26.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypercalcaemia occurs in many granulomatous diseases. Among them, sarcoidosis and tuberculosis are the most common causes. Other causes include berylliosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, Crohn's disease, silicone-induced granulomas, cat-scratch disease, Wegener's granulomatosis and pneumonia. Hypercalcaemia in granulomatous disease occurs as a consequence of dysregulated production of 1,25-(OH)2 D3 (calcitriol) by activated macrophages in granulomas. Hypercalcaemia in patients with infection has been reported in 0%-28% of cases. Uncultured bronchoalveolar lavage cells from patients with produce greater amounts of calcitriol compared with controls. Although Nayar described hypercalcaemia in a case of sepsis associated with intravesical Bacille Calmette Guerin therapy, there are no published reports describing hypercalcaemia in patients with pulmonary infection. We describe a patient with cavitary pulmonary infection with sustained hypercalcaemia that fluctuated and recurred repeatedly over the course of therapy, ultimately culminating in normalisation of serum calcium when therapy had led to cure. Treatment consisted of antituberculous therapy, oral corticosteroids and intravenous bisphosphonates with a favourable outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180128
[Lr] Last revision date:180128
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 2658 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29351943
[Au] Autor:Garner O; Iardino A; Ramirez A; Ahmed Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University at the Permian Basin, Odessa, Texas, USA.
[Ti] Title:Role of modified Eloesser flap in the treatment of bronchopleural fistula caused by pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Jan 18.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180120
[Lr] Last revision date:180120
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


page 1 of 266 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information