Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29099157
[Au] Autor:Sherid M; Samo S; Sulaiman S; Husein H; Sethuraman SN; Thiruvaiyaru D; Spurr C; Sifuentes H; Sridhar S
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Ischemic Colitis in the Young and the Elderly.
[So] Source:WMJ;115(4):196-202, 2016 08.
[Is] ISSN:1098-1861
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Ischemic colitis is traditionally known as a disease of the elderly; however, its recognition among the young recently has increased. The aim of this study was to illustrate the features of ischemic colitis in a younger population. METHODS: Medical records of patients with ischemic colitis from January 2007 to January 2013 were reviewed. The study was conducted in 2 hospitals, and the patients were divided into 2 groups: < 50 and ≥ 50 years old. RESULTS: A total of 118 patients with ischemic colitis were identified. Fifteen patients (12.7%) were < 50 years of age; 103 patients (87.3%) were ≥ 50 years old. While drugs and vasculitis­as a group­was the most common precipitating factor for ischemic colitis in the younger age group, constipation was the most common precipitating factor in the older age group. All patients in the younger group had rectal bleeding vs 70.9% in the older group (P = 0.009). History of coronary artery disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension were higher in the older group. Length of hospital stay was shorter in the younger group (3.4 days) than the older group (7.2 days). CONCLUSION: In this study, 12.7% of the patients were under age 50. All patients in this "young" age group experienced rectal bleeding and their hospital stay was shorter.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29098551
[Au] Autor:Cullaro G; Kim G; Pereira MR; Brown RS; Verna EC
[Ad] Address:Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation, Columbia University Medical Center, 622 West 168th St., PH 14-105K, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
[Ti] Title:Ascites Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Identifies Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis and Predicts Mortality in Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis.
[So] Source:Dig Dis Sci;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2568
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a marker of both tissue injury and infection. Urine NGAL levels strongly predict acute kidney injury and mortality in patients with cirrhosis, but ascites NGAL is not well characterized. We hypothesized that ascites NGAL level is a marker of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and mortality risk in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: Hospitalized patients with cirrhosis and ascites undergoing diagnostic paracentesis were prospectively enrolled and followed until death or discharge. Patients with secondary peritonitis, prior transplantation, or active colitis were excluded. NGAL was measured in the ascites and serum. Ascites NGAL level was evaluated as a marker of SBP (defined as ascites absolute neutrophil count > 250 cells/mm ) and predictor of in-patient mortality. RESULTS: A total of 146 patients were enrolled, and of these, 29 patients (20%) had SBP. Baseline characteristics were similar between subjects with and without SBP. Median (IQR) ascites NGAL was significantly higher in patients with SBP compared to those without SBP (221.3 [145.9-392.9] vs. 139.2 [73.9-237.2], p < 0.01). Sixteen (11%) patients died in the hospital. In the final multivariable model, ascites NGAL (OR 1.02 per 10 units, p < 0.01) remained predictive of in-hospital mortality, controlling for SBP (OR 9.76, p < 0.01) and MELD (OR 1.11, p = 0.01). In ROC analysis, ascites NGAL had an AUC of 0.79 for inhospital mortality, and the final model including ascites NGAL, MELD, and SBP had an AUC of 0.94. CONCLUSIONS: Ascites NGAL level may be a biomarker of peritonitis in hospitalized patient with cirrhosis and an independent predictor of short-term in-hospital mortality, even controlling for SBP and MELD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10620-017-4804-7

  3 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29095349
[Au] Autor:Mark J; Fernando SD; Masterson JC; Pan Z; Capocelli KE; Furuta GT; de Zoeten EF
[Ad] Address:*Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Digestive Health Institute, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora CO 80045 †Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Children's Hospital Colorado Aurora CO 80045 ‡Gastrointestinal Eosinophilic Diseases Program, Children's Hospital Colorado Aurora CO 80045 §Mucosal Inflammation Program, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado ||University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado ¶Department of Pathology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Implications of Pediatric Colonic Eosinophilia.
[So] Source:J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr;, 2017 Oct 31.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4801
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Pediatric colonic eosinophilia represents a confounding finding with a wide differential. It is often difficult to determine which children may progress to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which have an eosinophilic colitis (EC), and which may have no underlying pathology. There is little guidance for the practitioner on the approach to these patients. To define the clinical presentations of colonic eosinophilia and identify factors which may aid in diagnosis we reviewed patients with colonic eosinophilia and the clinicopathologic factors associated with their diagnoses. METHODS: An 8-year retrospective chart review of children whose histopathology identified colonic eosinophilia (N = 72) compared to controls with normal biopsies (N = 35). RESULTS: Patients with colonic eosinophilia had increased eosinophils/high power field (eos/HPF) compared to controls (p < 0.001) and had three clinical phenotypes. Thirty six percent had an inflammatory phenotype with elevated ESR (p < .0001), chronic inflammation on colonic biopsies (p < 0.001) and were diagnosed with IBD. Thirty seven percent were diagnosed with EC, associated with male gender (p < 0.005) and peripheral eosinophilia (p = 0.041). Twenty one percent had no significant colonic pathology. Forty three percent of patients had more than one colonoscopy and 68% of these had change from initial diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: There are three main phenotypes of children with colonic eosinophilia. Signs of chronic systemic inflammation raise suspicion for IBD. Peripheral eosinophilia and male gender are associated with EC. A significant percent of children with colonic eosinophilia do not have colonic disease. Eos/HPF is not reliable to differentiate etiologies. Repeat colonoscopies may be required to reach final diagnoses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/MPG.0000000000001784

  4 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29094346
[Au] Autor:Ingram JR; Jenkins-Jones S; Knipe DW; Morgan CLI; Cannings-John R; Piguet V
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology & Academic Wound Healing, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University, Cardiff, CF14 4XN, UK.
[Ti] Title:Population-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink study using algorithm modelling to identify the true burden of hidradenitis suppurativa.
[So] Source:Br J Dermatol;, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2133
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Epidemiology data regarding hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) are conflicting and prevalence estimates vary 80-fold, from 0.05% in a population-based study, to 4%. OBJECTIVES: To assess the hypothesis that previous population-based studies under-estimated true HS prevalence by missing undiagnosed cases. METHODS: We performed a population-based observational and case-control study using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) linked to Hospital Episode Statistics data. Physician-diagnosed cases in CPRD were identified from specific Read codes. Algorithms identified unrecognised 'proxy' cases, with at least five Read code records for boils in flexural skin sites. Validation of proxy cases was undertaken with General Practitioner questionnaires to confirm criteria-diagnosed cases. A case-control study assessed disease associations. RESULTS: On 30 June 2013, 23,353 physician-diagnosed HS cases were documented in 4,364,308 research-standard records. 68,890 proxy cases were identified, reduced to 10,146 criteria-diagnosed cases after validation, extrapolated from 107 completed questionnaires (61% return rate). Overall point prevalence was 0.77% (95% CI 0.76% to 0.78%). An additional 18,417 cases had a history of 1-4 flexural skin boils. In physician-diagnosed cases, ORs for current smoker and obesity (BMI>30) were 3.61 (95% CI 3.44 to 3.79) and 3.29 (95% CI 3.14 to 3.45). HS was associated with type 2 diabetes, Crohn's disease, hyperlipidaemia, acne and depression and not associated with ulcerative colitis or polycystic ovary syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to results of previous population-based studies, HS is relatively common, with a UK prevalence of 0.77%, one-third being unrecognised, criteria-diagnosed cases using the most stringent disease definition. If probable cases are included, HS prevalence rises to 1.19%. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/bjd.16101

  5 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29093626
[Au] Autor:Lahtinen P; Mattila E; Anttila VJ; Tillonen J; Teittinen M; Nevalainen P; Salminen S; Satokari R; Arkkila P
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Päijät-Häme Central Hospital, Lahti 15850, Finland. perttu.lahtinen@phhyky.fi.
[Ti] Title:Faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with and significant comorbidities as well as in patients with new indications: A case series.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;23(39):7174-7184, 2017 Oct 21.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is effective in recurrent infection (rCDI). Knowledge of the safety and efficacy of FMT treatment in immune deficient patients is scarce. FMT has been suggested as a potential method for an increasing number of new indications besides rCDI. Among our FMT-treated rCDI patients, we reviewed those with major comorbidities: two human immunodeficiency virus patients, six haemodialysis patients, two kidney transplant patients, two liver transplant patients and a patient with chronic lymphatic leukaemia. We also reviewed those treated with FMT for indications other than rCDI: carriage (two patients), trimethylaminuria (two patients), small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO; one patient), and lymphocytic colitis (one patient), as well as a common variable immunodeficiency patient with chronic norovirus infection and ESBL-producing ( ) carriage. Of the thirteen rCDI patients treated with FMT, eleven cleared the CDI. The observed adverse events were not directly attributable to FMT. Concerning the special indications, both and ESBL-producing were eradicated. One trimethylaminuria patient and one SIBO-patient reported a reduction of symptoms. Three patients did not experience a benefit from FMT: chronic norovirus, lymphocytic colitis and the other fish malodour syndrome. There were no reported side effects in this group. FMT appeared to be safe and effective for immunocompromised patients with rCDI. FMT showed promise for the eradication of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but further research is warranted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v23.i39.7174

  6 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29092855
[Au] Autor:Charlton R; Green A; Shaddick G; Snowball J; Nightingale A; Tillett W; Smith CH; McHugh N; PROMPT study group
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK.
[Ti] Title:Risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease in people with psoriatic arthritis: a population-based cohort study.
[So] Source:Ann Rheum Dis;, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1468-2060
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To determine the risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) compared with the general population and patients with psoriasis. METHODS: A cohort study using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink between 1998 and 2014. Patients with incident PsA aged 18-89 years were identified and matched to a cohort of patients with psoriasis and a general population cohort. The incidence of uveitis, all IBD, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis was calculated for each study cohort and adjusted relative risks (RR ) were calculated using conditional Poisson regression. RESULTS: 6783 incident cases of PsA were identified with a median age of 49 years. The risk of uveitis was significantly higher in the PsA cohort than in the general population and psoriasis cohorts (RR 3.55, 95% CI 2.21 to 5.70 and RR 2.13, 95% CI 1.40 to 3.24, respectively). A significant increase was observed for Crohn's disease (RR 2.96, 95% CI 1.46 to 6.00 and RR 3.60, 95% CI 1.83 to 7.10) but not for ulcerative colitis (RR 1.30, 95% CI 0.66 to 2.56 and RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.92). CONCLUSIONS: In a primary care-based incidence cohort of patients with PsA, there were substantial risks of developing uveitis and/or Crohn's disease, but not ulcerative colitis, when compared with the general population and psoriasis controls.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29091261
[Au] Autor:Bouladoux N; Harrison OJ; Belkaid Y
[Ad] Address:Mucosal Immunology Section, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.
[Ti] Title:The Mouse Model of Infection with Citrobacter rodentium.
[So] Source:Curr Protoc Immunol;119:19.15.1-19.15.25, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1934-368X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Citrobacter rodentium is a murine mucosal pathogen used as a model to elucidate the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of infection with two clinically important human gastrointestinal pathogens, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). C. rodentium infection provides an excellent model to study different aspects of host-pathogen interaction in the gut, including intestinal inflammatory responses during bacteria-induced colitis, mucosal healing and epithelial repair, the induction of mucosal immune responses, and the role of the intestinal microbiota in mediating resistance to colonization by enteric pathogens. This unit provides detailed protocols for growing this bacterium, infecting mice by intragastric inoculation, measuring bacterial loads in feces and organs, and monitoring intestinal pathology induced by infection. Additional protocols describe steps needed to create frozen stocks, establish a growth curve, perform ex vivo organ cultures, isolate immune cells from the large intestine, and measure immune response by flow cytometry. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/cpim.34

  8 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29085220
[Au] Autor:Sorrentino D
[Ad] Address:IBD Center, Division of Gastroenterology, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke, VA 24016, United States.
[Ti] Title:Microbial dysbiosis in spouses of ulcerative colitis patients: Any clues to disease pathogenesis?
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;23(37):6747-6749, 2017 Oct 07.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A number of alterations have been found within the gut microbial profile of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases when compared with the healthy population; however, it is unclear whether such dysbiosis is the cause or simply the consequence of the disease state. In ulcerative colitis, the environment seems to play a crucial role in disease etiology since monozygotic twins show a concordance rate of only 8%-10% - though it is unclear whether it does so by acting through the microbiome. In this study, the authors investigated the influence of cohabitation on the gut microbial community in healthy partners of ulcerative colitis patients - with the intent of clarifying some of these issues. As expected, ulcerative colitis patients had a significant dysbiosis and alterations in microbial metabolism. Interestingly, these abnormal fecal microbial communities were relatively similar amongst patients and their spouses. Thus, this study shows that the microbial profile might be partially transferred from ulcerative colitis patients to healthy individuals. Whether this finding impacts on disease development or has any implication for the role of the microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease etiology remains to be determined.
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v23.i37.6747

  9 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29085208
[Au] Autor:Dubois-Camacho K; Ottum PA; Franco-Muñoz D; De la Fuente M; Torres-Riquelme A; Díaz-Jiménez D; Olivares-Morales M; Astudillo G; Quera R; Hermoso MA
[Ad] Address:Innate Immunity Laboratory, Immunology Program, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380453, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Glucocorticosteroid therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: From clinical practice to molecular biology.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;23(36):6628-6638, 2017 Sep 28.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are chronic pathologies associated with a deregulated immune response in the intestinal mucosa, and they are triggered by environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Exogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely used as anti-inflammatory therapy in IBDs. In the past, patients with moderate or severe states of inflammation received GCs as a first line therapy with an important effectiveness in terms of reduction of the disease activity and the induction of remission. However, this treatment often results in detrimental side effects. This downside drove the development of second generation GCs and more precise (non-systemic) drug-delivery methods. Recent clinical trials show that most of these new treatments have similar effectiveness to first generation GCs with fewer adverse effects. The remaining challenge in successful treatment of IBDs concerns the refractoriness and dependency that some patients encounter during GCs treatment. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying GC response is key to personalizing drug choice for IBDs patients to optimize their response to treatment. In this review, we examine the clinical characteristics of treatment with GCs, followed by an in depth analysis of the proposed molecular mechanisms involved in its resistance and dependence associated with IBDs. This thorough analysis of current clinical and biomedical literature may help guide physicians in determining a course of treatment for IBDs patients and identifies important areas needing further study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v23.i36.6628

  10 / 96299 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29085197
[Au] Autor:Lee DW; Koo JS; Choe JW; Suh SJ; Kim SY; Hyun JJ; Jung SW; Jung YK; Yim HJ; Lee SW
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do 15355, South Korea.
[Ti] Title:Diagnostic delay in inflammatory bowel disease increases the risk of intestinal surgery.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;23(35):6474-6481, 2017 Sep 21.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To investigate the factors affecting diagnostic delay and outcomes of diagnostic delay in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We retrospectively studied 165 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 130 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who were diagnosed and had follow up durations > 6 mo at Korea University Ansan Hospital from January 2000 to December 2015. A diagnostic delay was defined as the time interval between the first symptom onset and IBD diagnosis in which the 76 to 100 percentiles of patients were diagnosed. RESULTS: The median diagnostic time interval was 6.2 and 2.4 mo in the patients with CD and UC, respectively. Among the initial symptoms, perianal discomfort before di-agnosis (OR = 10.2, 95%CI: 1.93-54.3, = 0.006) was associated with diagnostic delays in patients with CD; however, no clinical factor was associated with diagnostic delays in patients with UC. Diagnostic delays, stricturing type, and penetrating type were associated with increased intestinal surgery risks in CD (OR = 2.54, 95%CI: 1.06-6.09; OR = 4.44, 95%CI: 1.67-11.8; OR = 3.79, 95%CI: 1.14-12.6, respectively). In UC, a diagnostic delay was the only factor associated increased intestinal surgery risks (OR = 6.81, 95%CI: 1.12-41.4). CONCLUSION: A diagnostic delay was associated with poor outcomes, such as increased intestinal surgery risks in patients with CD and UC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v23.i35.6474


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