Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 25317346
[Au] Autor:Hazin R; Elia CJ; Putruss M; Bazzi A
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Garden Street, Suite No. 214, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA....
[Ti] Title:Optic nerve injury in a patient with chronic allergic conjunctivitis.
[So] Source:Case Rep Neurol Med;2014:928486, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2090-6668
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Manipulation of the optic nerve can lead to irreversible vision changes. We present a patient with a past medical history of skin allergy and allergic conjunctivitis (AC) who presented with insidious unexplained unilateral vision loss. Physical exam revealed significant blepharospasm, mild lid edema, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, afferent pupillary defect, and slight papillary hypertrophy. Slit lamp examination demonstrated superior and inferior conjunctival scarring as well as superior corneal scarring but no signs of external trauma or neurological damage were noted. Conjunctival cultures and cytologic evaluation demonstrated significant eosinophilic infiltration. Subsequent ophthalmoscopic examination revealed optic nerve atrophy. Upon further questioning, the patient admitted to vigorous itching of the affected eye for many months. Given the presenting symptoms, history, and negative ophthalmological workup, it was determined that the optic nerve atrophy was likely secondary to digital pressure from vigorous itching. Although AC can be a significant source of decreased vision via corneal ulceration, no reported cases have ever described AC-induced vision loss of this degree from vigorous itching and chronic pressure leading to optic nerve damage. Despite being self-limiting in nature, allergic conjunctivitis should be properly managed as extreme cases can result in mechanical compression of the optic nerve and compromise vision.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141015
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/928486

  2 / 12972 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24916929
[Au] Autor:Eperon S; Berguiga M; Ballabeni P; Guex-Crosier C; Guex-Crosier Y
[Ad] Address:Ocular Immunology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, University of Lausanne, 15, Av. de France, 1000, Lausanne 7, Switzerland, simone.eperon@fa2.ch.
[Ti] Title:Total IgE and eotaxin (CCL11) contents in tears of patients suffering from seasonal allergic conjunctivitis.
[So] Source:Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol;252(9):1359-67, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1435-702X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To prospectively investigate patients with seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC) during the pollen season and test associations between tears total IgE, eotaxin concentrations, and SAC severity. METHODS: Enrolled patients presented ocular symptoms and clinical signs of SAC at the time of presentation. Ocular itching, hyperaemia, chemosis, eyelid swelling, and tearing were scored, and the sum of these scores was defined as the clinical score. Conjunctival papillae were separately graded. We measured eotaxin concentration in tears by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and total tear IgE by Lacrytest strip. RESULTS: Among thirty patients (30 eyes), 11 showed neither tear IgE nor tear eotaxin, while 15 out of 19 patients with positive IgE values presented a positive amount of eotaxin in their tears (Fisher's test: p < 0.001). The mean eotaxin concentration was 641 ± 154 (SEM) pg/ml. In patients with no amount of tear IgE, we observed a lower conjunctival papilla grade than in patients whose tears contained some amount of IgE (trend test: p = 0.032). In the 15 patients whose tear eotaxin concentration was null, tear IgE concentration was 5.3 ± 3.5 arbitrary units; in the other 15 patients whose eotaxin was positive, IgE reached 21 ± 4.3 arbitrary U (Mann-Whitney: p < 0.001). We measured 127 ± 47 pg/ml eotaxin in patients with no history of SAC but newly diagnosed as suffering from SAC, and 852 ± 218 pg/ml eotaxin in patients with a known SAC (p = 0.008). In contrast, tear IgE concentrations of both groups did not differ statistically significantly (p = 0.947). CONCLUSIONS: If IgE and eotaxin secreted in tears are major contributors in SAC pathogenesis, they however act at different steps of the process.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00417-014-2683-6

  3 / 12972 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25302603
[Au] Autor:Nordgren H; Aaltonen K; Sironen T; Kinnunen PM; Kivistö I; Raunio-Saarnisto M; Moisander-Jylhä AM; Korpela J; Kokkonen UM; Hetzel U; Sukura A; Vapalahti O
[Ad] Address:Production Animal Section, Finnish Food Safety Authority (Evira), Seinäjoki, Finland....
[Ti] Title:Characterization of a New Epidemic Necrotic Pyoderma in Fur Animals and Its Association with Arcanobacterium phocae Infection.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(10):e110210, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A new type of pyoderma was detected in Finnish fur animals in 2007. The disease continues to spread within and between farms, with severe and potentially fatal symptoms. It compromises animal welfare and causes considerable economic losses to farmers. A case-control study was performed in 2010-2011 to describe the entity and to identify the causative agent. Altogether 99 fur animals were necropsied followed by pathological and microbiological examination. The data indicated that the disease clinically manifests in mink (Neovison vison) by necrotic dermatitis of the feet and facial skin. In finnraccoons (Nyctereutes procyonoides), it causes painful abscesses in the paws. Foxes (Vulpes lagopus) are affected by severe conjunctivitis and the infection rapidly spreads to the eyelids and facial skin. A common finding at necropsy was necrotic pyoderma. Microbiological analysis revealed the presence of a number of potential causative agents, including a novel Streptococcus sp. The common finding from all diseased animals of all species was Arcanobacterium phocae. This bacterium has previously been isolated from marine mammals with skin lesions but this is the first report of A. phocae isolated in fur animals with pyoderma. The results obtained from this study implicate A. phocae as a potential causative pathogen of fur animal epidemic necrotic pyoderma (FENP) and support observations that the epidemic may have originated in a species -shift of the causative agent from marine mammals. The variable disease pattern and the presence of other infectious agents (in particular the novel Streptococcus sp.) suggest a multifactorial etiology for FENP, and further studies are needed to determine the environmental, immunological and infectious factors contributing to the disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0110210

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[PMID]: 25271444
[Au] Autor:Puzelli S; Rossini G; Facchini M; Vaccari G; Di Trani L; Di Martino A; Gaibani P; Vocale C; Cattoli G; Bennett M; McCauley JW; Rezza G; Moro ML; Rangoni R; Finarelli AC; Landini MP; Castrucci MR; Donatelli I; Influenza Task Force
[Ti] Title:Human Infection with Highly Pathogenic A(H7N7) Avian Influenza Virus, Italy, 2013.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;20(10):1741-5, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:During an influenza A(H7N7) virus outbreak among poultry in Italy during August-September 2013, infection with a highly pathogenic A(H7N7) avian influenza virus was diagnosed for 3 poultry workers with conjunctivitis. Genetic analyses revealed that the viruses from the humans were closely related to those from chickens on affected farms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2010.140512

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[PMID]: 25073415
[Au] Autor:Hofmannová L; Sak B; Jekl V; Mináriková A; Skoric M; Kvác M
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathological Morphology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Palackého tr. 1/3, 612 42 Brno, Czech Republic; Central European Institute of Technology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Pala...
[Ti] Title:Lethal Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype III infection in Steppe lemmings (Lagurus lagurus).
[So] Source:Vet Parasitol;205(1-2):357-60, 2014 Sep 15.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2550
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Microsporidia are ubiquitous, spore-forming, intracellular parasites infecting invertebrates and vertebrates. Some of them are important opportunistic pathogens in humans, including three species of genus Encephalitozoon. Intraspecies genetic variation with a different range of hosts is known in Encephalitozoon cuniculi distinguishing four genotypes. Recently, E. cuniculi is often observed in pet animals, mainly E. cuniculi genotype I in pet rabbits. This study described a fatal encephalitozoonosis in a group of pet rodents Steppe lemmings (Lagurus lagurus). The animals were presented with progressive weight loss, aggression, cannibalism, purulent conjunctivitis and hind limb paresis. Death occurred within 48 h after the onset of clinical signs. The group comprised of 15 animals was affected and died within a period of three months. Post-mortal examination did not show any macroscopic changes. Microsporidial vacuoles with typical spores were found in brain and kidney tissues and E. cuniculi DNA in all tested organs. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of rRNA gene showed 100% homology with E. cuniculi genotype III previously identified in dogs, tamarin colonies from zoos, swine, birds and humans. Pet lemmings could represent a new potential source of the infection for their breeders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 12972 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25182353
[Au] Autor:Platt M
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.
[Ti] Title:Pharmacotherapy for allergic rhinitis.
[So] Source:Int Forum Allergy Rhinol;4 Suppl 2:S35-40, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2042-6984
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pharmacotherapy for allergic rhinitis is a mainstay of treatment for patients with mild to severe nasal allergy symptoms. A wide array of medical treatment options is available for both episodic relief and prevention of symptoms. Treatment regimens can be tailored to individual patients based on nasal symptoms, severity, and associated atopic disorders. The purposes of this review are to identify available pharmacotherapies for allergic rhinitis, to discuss the benefits and limitations of each treatment option, and to help guide practitioners in providing optimal medical treatment for patients with allergic rhinitis. METHODS: A comprehensive review of pharmacotherapies for allergic rhinitis was performed using a PubMed search. Secondary sources within indexed studies were also compiled to review current medication options for patients with allergic rhinitis. The benefits and limitations of each class of allergy medication were reviewed to provide information on selecting the optimal treatment regimen for patients with allergic rhinitis. RESULTS: Pharmacotherapies for allergic rhinitis that are currently used in clinical practice include antihistamines, corticosteroids, leukotriene modifiers, mast cell stabilizers, expectorants, and decongestants. Symptoms of nasal congestion, itching, sneezing, and rhinorrhea can be targeted with specific therapies that modulate the acute-phase or late-phase allergic reactions. Associated atopic disorders, including conjunctivitis and asthma, can help guide medication selection. CONCLUSION: Pharmacotherapies for allergic rhinitis offer numerous options that are safe, effective, and readily available to target specific nasal symptoms. Symptom-based selection of allergy medications can result in optimal treatment for patients with allergic rhinitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/alr.21381

  7 / 12972 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25183929
[Au] Autor:Gelaw Y; Abateneh A
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Jimma University, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Ocular morbidity among refugees in Southwest Ethiopia.
[So] Source:Ethiop J Health Sci;24(3):227-34, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1029-1857
[Cp] Country of publication:Ethiopia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Low vision and blindness are recognized as one of the major public health problems worldwide, especially in developing countries. The prevalence and cause of blindness and low vision vary from region to region, among different age and population groups in a country or geographical region. The objective of this study is thus to determine the causes of blindness and ocular morbidity among refugees in Southwest Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional clinic based study was conducted on 1,054 refugees in Southwest Ethiopia. A basic anterior and posterior segment examination was done by ophthalmologists with Magnifying Loupe 2.5X and Direct Ophthalmoscope. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. RESULTS: The most common causes of ocular morbidity identified were trachoma 547(21.2%), cataract 501(19.4%), refractive error 353(13.7%), conjunctivitis 240(9.3%), glaucoma 130(5.1%) and climatic droplet keratopathy 112(4.4%). The overall prevalence of blindness was 26.2% and the prevalence of childhood blindness was 0.7%. The prevalence was higher among females (16.9%) than males (9.3%) and age groups 60 years and above (15.9%) than other age groups (10.3%) (P<0.05). The overall prevalence of low vision was 25.8% and the prevalence of low vision in pediatric age group was 0.9%. The leading causes of blindness were cataract 112(40.6%), trachomatous corneal opacity 58(21.0%) and glaucoma 49(17.8%). The commonest cause of low vision was cataract 102(37.6%) followed by trachomatous corneal opacity 49(18.1%) and refractive error 35(12.9%). CONCLUSIONS: There is a very high burden of blinding eye diseases among refugees. Integrated multidisciplinary intervention strategies for the prevention and control of blindness and low vision in the study settings should be initiated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 25163575
[Au] Autor:Mimura T
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Women's Medical University Medical Center East.
[Ti] Title:[Influence of environmental factor on allergic conjunctivitis].
[So] Source:Arerugi;63(7):901-6, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0021-4884
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Air Pollutants/adverse effects
Conjunctivitis, Allergic/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Disease Models, Animal
Disease Progression
Dust
Humans
Mice
Particulate Matter/adverse effects
Pollen/adverse effects
Smog/adverse effects
Soil Pollutants/adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Air Pollutants); 0 (Dust); 0 (Particulate Matter); 0 (Smog); 0 (Soil Pollutants); 0 (Vehicle Emissions)
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140828
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 12972 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25313604
[Au] Autor:Eren Gok S; Kocagul Celikbas A; Baykam N; Atay Buyukdemirci A; Eroglu MN; Evren Kemer O; Dokuzoguz B
[Ad] Address:Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. sebnemeren@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of tularemia cases focusing on the oculoglandular form.
[So] Source:J Infect Dev Ctries;8(10):1277-84, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1972-2680
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Tularemia is a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis. The oculoglandular form is one of the rarest forms. In this study, evaluated tularemia patients, focusing on the ocular form and the efficacy of early antibiotic therapy. METHODOLOGY: During a tularemia outbreak, the epidemiological and clinical findings, laboratory assays, and drugs used for the treatment of 48 patients were recorded prospectively. The diagnosis of tularemia was confirmed with microagglutination test (MAT) as well as clinical findings. RESULTS: The mean age of the subject was 48.6 years; 23 (47.9%) of them were female. Thirty-six (81.25%) patients had clinical presentation compatible with oropharyngeal tularemia, seven (14.58%) with oculoglandular tularemia, and two (4.1%) with ulceroglandular tularemia. The most common symptoms were fever (91.6%) and sore throat (81.2%), and the most common findings were lymphadenopathy (91.6%) and tonsillopharyngitis (81.2%). In the oculoglandular form, fever, lymphadenopathy, periorbital edema, conjunctival injection, and chemosis were found. The most distinctive ophthalmic feature was follicular conjunctivitis and conjunctival epithelial defects. Forty-five cases had positive serological results with MAT. All the patients were treated with antibiotics considered effective against F. tularensis, and topical antimicrobial treatment was given to the patients with oculoglandular tularemia. Twenty-six (54.16%) patients, who were admitted within three weeks of the onset of symptoms, recovered without sequel. CONCLUSIONS: During tularemia outbreaks, ocular involvement should be considered carefully. The early administration of appropriate treatment will be more effective in resolving the infection and preventing complications. Along with systemic antibiotic therapy, topical treatment will help recovery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3855/jidc.3996

  10 / 12972 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24274605
[Au] Autor:Rosas-Alvarado A; Morfin-Maciel B
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Alergia, Hospital General de México, O.D. México, D.F. alex3rosas@yahoo.com.mx.
[Ti] Title:Reactividad cutánea al extracto del polen de hiedra común (Hedera helix) en pacientes con enfermedades alérgicas. [Cutaneous reactivity to common ivy (Hedera helix) pollen extract in allergic patients].
[So] Source:Rev Alerg Mex;60(3):105-9, 2013 Jul-Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0002-5151
[Cp] Country of publication:Mexico
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Common ivy is an ubiquitous ornamental plant found indoors and outdoors. It may cause occupational contact dermatitis and asthma. Many traditional and naturistic preparations may contain their extracts, hence sensitization may occur by several routes. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of sensitization to Hedera helix pollen by skin prick test on allergic subjects. METHODS: Skin prick tests (SPT) with 24 pollen extracts, including Hedera helix extract, were performed on 62 patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma, allergic conjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis. It was determined the frequency of sensitization to pollen extracts and the differences in the reactivity patterns among patients who showed a positive or negative result with Hedera helix extract. A cluster analysis was made to identify cross-allergenicity among pollen extracts. RESULTS: Eleven out of 62(17.7%) patients had a positive SPT with common ivy pollen extract. The main differences found were the number of pollen species to which patients were allergic. Patients with atopic dermatitis had a nine-fold higher frequency of positive skin tests with Hedera extracts, than subjects with other allergic diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Hedera helix pollen extract is a frequent cause of sensitization among allergic patients, and show cross-allergenicity with pollen from different sources. There is a higher frequency of positive skin tests with Hedera extract in patients with atopic dermatitis than with other allergies.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Allergens/immunology
Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology
Hedera/immunology
Pollen/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Child
Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Allergens)
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Cu] Class update date: 141014
[Lr] Last revision date:141014
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131126
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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