Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Conjunctivitis [Words]
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[PMID]: 25834659
[Au] Autor:Koenig KL; Alassaf W; Burns MJ
[Ad] Address:University of California, Irvine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Orange, California.
[Ti] Title:Identify-isolate-inform: a tool for initial detection and management of measles patients in the emergency department.
[So] Source:West J Emerg Med;16(2):212-9, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1936-9018
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Measles (rubeola) is a highly contagious airborne disease that was declared eliminated in the U.S. in the year 2000. Only sporadic U.S. cases and minor outbreaks occurred until the larger outbreak beginning in 2014 that has become a public health emergency. The "Identify-Isolate-Inform" tool will assist emergency physicians to be better prepared to detect and manage measles patients presenting to the emergency department. Measles typically presents with a prodrome of high fever, and cough/coryza/conjunctivitis, sometimes accompanied by the pathognomonic Koplik spots. Two to four days later, an erythematous maculopapular rash begins on the face and spreads down the body. Suspect patients must be immediately isolated with airborne precautions while awaiting laboratory confirmation of disease. Emergency physicians must rapidly inform the local public health department and hospital infection control personnel of suspected measles cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5811/westjem.2015.3.25678

  2 / 13151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25763053
[Au] Autor:Cury GC; Pereira RF; de Hollanda LM; Lancellotti M
[Ad] Address:Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry Institute of Biology State University of Campinas CampinasSP Brazil Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brazil....
[Ti] Title:Inflammatory response of Haemophilus influenzae biotype aegyptius causing Brazilian Purpuric Fever.
[So] Source:Braz J Microbiol;45(4):1449-54, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1678-4405
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Brazilian Purpuric Fever (BPF) is a systemic disease with many clinical features of meningococcal sepsis and is usually preceded by purulent conjunctivitis. The illness is caused by Haemophilus influenza biogroup aegyptius, which was associated exclusively with conjunctivitis. In this work construction of the las gene, hypothetically responsible for this virulence, were fusioned with ermAM cassette in Neisseria meningitidis virulent strains and had its DNA transfer to non BPF H. influenzae strains. The effect of the las transfer was capable to increase the cytokines TNFα and IL10 expression in Hec-1B cells line infected with these transformed mutants (in eight log scale of folding change RNA expression). This is the first molecular study involving the las transfer to search an elucidation of the pathogenic factors by horizontal intergeneric transfer from meningococci to H. influenzae.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1503
[Cu] Class update date: 150404
[Lr] Last revision date:150404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 13151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25749770
[Au] Autor:Han DH; Ahn JC; Mun SJ; Park SK; Oh SY; Rhee CS
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Novel Risk Factors for Allergic Rhinitis in Korean Elementary School Children: ARCO-kids Phase II in a Community.
[So] Source:Allergy Asthma Immunol Res;7(3):234-40, 2014 Apr 3.
[Is] ISSN:2092-7355
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a multifactorial disease whose genetic and environmental risk factors have been studied for decades. Many pediatric studies have pointed out the familial history of allergy, hygiene hypothesis, breast-feeding, pet ownership, and diets as risk factors of AR. However, most of factors are still up for debate. This preliminary report aimed to confirm the known risk factors and find the novel risk factors for AR in the Korean pediatric population. METHODS: A bi-seasonal, winter and summer, study in 2 elementary schools included all students whose parents completed the questionnaire of medical and social histories, quality of life, infant and early-childhood history, and the living styles. Skin prick tests and endoscopic examinations were conducted on all participants. RESULTS: Among total 1,020 children, 338 participants had AR. The multivariate logistic regression analysis highlighted 6 factors: male gender (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.32-3.33), older age (1.65; 1.03-2.65), previous history of allergic conjunctivitis (14.25; 4.99-40.74), asthma (2.73; 0.96-7.76) and pneumonia (0.39; 0.19-0.82), and an hour increase in daily playing time (0.90; 0.80-1.00). CONCLUSIONS: Lack of pneumonia in early childhood and short playing time are newly found risk factors for Korean pediatric AR in this study confirming male gender, older age and previous history of allergic conjunctivitis and asthma as the risk factors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150404
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4168/aair.2015.7.3.234

  4 / 13151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25838784
[Au] Autor:Moore DL; MacDonald NE; Canadian Paediatric Society, Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee
[Ti] Title:Preventing ophthalmia neonatorum.
[So] Source:Paediatr Child Health;20(2):93-6, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1205-7088
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The use of silver nitrate as prophylaxis for neonatal ophthalmia was instituted in the late 1800s to prevent the devastating effects of neonatal ocular infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. At that time - during the preantibiotic era - many countries made such prophylaxis mandatory by law. Today, neonatal gonococcal ophthalmia is rare in Canada, but ocular prophylaxis for this condition remains mandatory in some provinces/ territories. Silver nitrate drops are no longer available and erythromycin, the only ophthalmic antibiotic eye ointment currently available for use in newborns, is of questionable efficacy. Ocular prophylaxis is not effective in preventing chlamydial conjunctivitis. Applying medication to the eyes of newborns may result in mild eye irritation and has been perceived by some parents as interfering with mother-infant bonding. Physicians caring for newborns should advocate for rescinding mandatory ocular prophylaxis laws. More effective means of preventing ophthalmia neonatorum include screening all pregnant women for gonorrhea and chlamydia infection, and treatment and follow-up of those found to be infected. Mothers who were not screened should be tested at delivery. Infants of mothers with untreated gonococcal infection at delivery should receive ceftriaxone. Infants exposed to chlamydia at delivery should be followed closely for signs of infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150403
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 25015124
[Au] Autor:Caffarelli C; Santamaria F; Vottero A; Dascola CP; Mirra V; Sperli F; Bernasconi S
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinica Pediatrica, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. carlo.caffarelli@unipr.it.
[Ti] Title:Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.
[So] Source:Ital J Pediatr;40:62, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1824-7288
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis, hypertension and breastfeeding in women treated with antiepileptic drugs and healthy breakfast have been reported. Epidemiological studies have given emphasis to high incidence of autoimmune disorders in patients with Turner syndrome, increasing prevalence of celiac disease, frequency of hypertension in adolescents, incidence and risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity. Advances in prevention include elucidation of the role of probiotics in reducing occurrence of allergies and feeding intolerance, and events of foetal life that influence later onset of diseases. Mechanistic studies suggested a role for vitamin D deficiency in asthma and type 1 diabetes and for reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus in aseptic meningitis. Regarding diagnosis, a new mean for the diagnosis of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborns, a score for recognition of impaired nutritional status and growth and criteria for early Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome have been suggested. New therapeutic approaches consist of use of etanercept for reducing insulin dose in type 1 diabetes, probiotics in atopic eczema, and melatonin in viral infections.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pediatrics/trends
Periodicals as Topic
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Allergy and Immunology/trends
Cardiology/trends
Endocrinology/trends
Gastroenterology/trends
Humans
Infectious Disease Medicine/trends
Neonatology/trends
Neurology/trends
Nutritional Sciences/trends
Pulmonary Medicine/trends
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140723
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/1824-7288-40-62

  6 / 13151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25831809
[Au] Autor:Kase S
[Ti] Title:[Corneal epithelial disorder, lacrimal drainage obstruction, and conjunctivitis].
[So] Source:Nihon Rinsho;73 Suppl 2:490-3, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0047-1852
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 13151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25388376
[Au] Autor:Valentino MD; McGuire AM; Rosch JW; Bispo PJ; Burnham C; Sanfilippo CM; Carter RA; Zegans ME; Beall B; Earl AM; Tuomanen EI; Morris TW; Haas W; Gilmore MS
[Ad] Address:1] Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles Street C703, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA [2] Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvar...
[Ti] Title:Unencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae from conjunctivitis encode variant traits and belong to a distinct phylogenetic cluster.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;5:5411, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Streptococcus pneumoniae, an inhabitant of the upper respiratory mucosa, causes respiratory and invasive infections as well as conjunctivitis. Strains that lack the capsule, a main virulence factor and the target of current vaccines, are often isolated from conjunctivitis cases. Here we perform a comparative genomic analysis of 271 strains of conjunctivitis-causing S. pneumoniae from 72 postal codes in the United States. We find that the vast majority of conjunctivitis strains are members of a distinct cluster of closely related unencapsulated strains. These strains possess divergent forms of pneumococcal virulence factors (such as CbpA and neuraminidases) that are not shared with other unencapsulated nasopharyngeal S. pneumoniae. They also possess putative adhesins that have not been described in encapsulated pneumococci. These findings suggest that the unencapsulated strains capable of causing conjunctivitis utilize a pathogenesis strategy substantially different from that described for S. pneumoniae at other infection sites.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1411
[Cu] Class update date: 150201
[Lr] Last revision date:150201
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/ncomms6411

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[PMID]: 25229278
[Au] Autor:Anjos LM; Marcondes MB; Lima MF; Mondelli AL; Okoshi MP
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP, Brazil....
[Ti] Title:Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.
[So] Source:Rev Soc Bras Med Trop;47(4):409-13, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1678-9849
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A ß-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Pharyngitis
Streptococcal Infections
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Disease
Humans
Pharyngitis/diagnosis
Pharyngitis/drug therapy
Pharyngitis/microbiology
Streptococcal Infections/diagnosis
Streptococcal Infections/drug therapy
Streptococcal Infections/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140918
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 13151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25061855
[Au] Autor:Dartt DA; Masli S
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Ophthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute/Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School bDepartment of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
[Ti] Title:Conjunctival epithelial and goblet cell function in chronic inflammation and ocular allergic inflammation.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol;14(5):464-70, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1473-6322
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although conjunctival goblet cells are a major cell type in ocular mucosa, their responses during ocular allergy are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the recent findings that provide key insights into the mechanisms by which their function and survival are altered during chronic inflammatory responses, including ocular allergy. RECENT FINDINGS: Conjunctiva represents a major component of the ocular mucosa that harbors specialized lymphoid tissue. Exposure of mucin-secreting goblet cells to allergic and inflammatory mediators released by the local innate and adaptive immune cells modulates proliferation, secretory function, and cell survival. Allergic mediators like histamine, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins directly stimulate goblet cell mucin secretion and consistently increase goblet cell proliferation. Goblet cell mucin secretion is also detectable in a murine model of allergic conjunctivitis. Additionally, primary goblet cell cultures allow evaluation of various inflammatory cytokines with respect to changes in goblet cell mucin secretion, proliferation, and apoptosis. These findings in combination with the preclinical mouse models help understand the goblet cell responses and their modulation during chronic inflammatory diseases, including ocular allergy. SUMMARY: Recent findings related to conjunctival goblet cells provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches, involving modulation of goblet cell mucin production, to improve treatment of ocular allergies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACI.0000000000000098

  10 / 13151 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24725321
[Au] Autor:Saban DR
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; Department of Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA. Electronic address: daniel.saban@duke.edu.
[Ti] Title:The chemokine receptor CCR7 expressed by dendritic cells: a key player in corneal and ocular surface inflammation.
[So] Source:Ocul Surf;12(2):87-99, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1937-5913
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly potent stimulators of the immune system, and their contribution as such to the pathogenesis of corneal and ocular surface inflammatory disease has been well established. These vigorous antigen-presenting cells are reliant upon their effective migration from peripheral tissues (e.g., those of the ocular surface) to the lymphoid organs, where immune responses are triggered and can then cause disease. The chemokine receptor CCR7 expressed on DCs has emerged as the master mediator of this highly complex migratory process, and thus it is important in causing corneal and ocular surface inflammation. Furthermore, CCR7 has received considerable attention as a potential therapeutic target, as topically instilled antagonists of this receptor are quite effective therapeutically in a mouse model of ocular allergy. These findings and more are reviewed in the current article. In addition, the understanding regarding CCR7 function in mice and humans, and the biology of DCs that populate the ocular surface are also detailed herein. The involvement of DCs and their expression of CCR7 in corneal and ocular surface diseases such as in ocular allergy, dry eye disease, immune rejection and more, are also reviewed here.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Conjunctivitis/immunology
Cornea/immunology
Dendritic Cells/immunology
Keratitis/immunology
Receptors, CCR7/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Conjunctivitis/pathology
Cornea/cytology
Humans
Keratitis/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (CCR7 protein, human); 0 (Ccr7 protein, mouse); 0 (Receptors, CCR7)
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Cu] Class update date: 150401
[Lr] Last revision date:150401
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140414
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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