Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Conjunctivitis [Words]
References found : 12914 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1292 go to page                         

  1 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25152611
[Au] Autor:Bergmann MT; Williams JI; Gomes PJ
[Ad] Address:Eye Care Associates of Greater Cincinnati, Inc., Cincinnati, OH, USA.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of allergic conjunctivitis with bepotastine besilate ophthalmic solution 1.5%.
[So] Source:Clin Ophthalmol;8:1495-505, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1177-5467
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To examine the pooled per-protocol ocular end points from two conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) clinical trials of the dual-action antihistamine bepotastine besilate ophthalmic solution (BBOS) 1.5%. METHODS: Two Phase III, placebo-controlled, double-masked, randomized clinical trials were conducted at a total of six separate centers using the CAC model of allergic conjunctivitis. The same study design was employed for both clinical trials, with subjects randomly assigned to either BBOS 1.5% (n=78) or placebo (n=79) treatment. Each subject received one eye drop of the test agent bilaterally at different study visits 15 minutes, 8 hours, or 16 hours prior to a CAC. Primary ocular end points included changes in ocular itching reported at 3, 5, and 7 minutes and conjunctival hyperemia assessed at 7, 15, and 20 minutes following each CAC. Secondary ocular end points included chemosis as well as episcleral and ciliary hyperemia judged by investigators, and tearing (scored as either absent or present) and eyelid swelling judged by subjects. RESULTS: A statistically significant reduction in ocular itching was observed for BBOS 1.5% treatment compared to placebo at all time points (P<0.0001), while measures for onset and 8-hour persistence of action also reached clinical significance (ie, ≥1.0 unit difference) at a majority of time points. In addition, a significant reduction in conjunctival hyperemia was achieved at a majority of time points during the onset of action CAC test. Secondary end points were also significantly improved compared to placebo, most prominently for reduced tearing at all study visits and reduced eyelid swelling at the onset of action and 8-hour study visits. Adverse events were generally mild and transient. CONCLUSION: BBOS 1.5% rapidly reduced CAC-induced ocular itching with duration of effectiveness of at least 8 hours after dosing. Certain secondary signs of inflammation were also significantly reduced.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140825
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/OPTH.S66637

  2 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24039213
[Au] Autor:Ozturk AB; Celebioglu E; Karakaya G; Kalyoncu AF
[Ad] Address:Adult Allergy Unit, Department of Chest Disease, School of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Kadiköy, Ankara, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Protective efficacy of sunglasses on the conjunctival symptoms of seasonal rhinitis.
[So] Source:Int Forum Allergy Rhinol;3(12):1001-6, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2042-6984
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Although allergen avoidance can lead to significant improvements in symptoms of allergic rhinitis, there are very few studies in this area. Sunglasses could be effective for protection of eyes from pollen as a cheap, comfortable, and simple avoidance option for allergens. The aim of this study is to determine if wearing sunglasses can decrease ocular symptoms. METHODS: Ocular symptomatic patients (39 total) who had a confirmed history of seasonal rhinitis by skin prick tests and negative skin prick tests for perennial allergens were included in the study. The duration of the study was 4 weeks with 3 required visits. At the onset of the 1-week run-in period, patients were randomized and divided into 2 groups. Group I (n = 18) received topical aqueous nasal budesonide regularly and loratadine once daily as a rescue medication. Group II (n = 21) wore sunglasses during daytime as an addition to this medication. Subjective data included a daily diary recording nasal and ocular symptom scores and antihistamine need during the study period. RESULTS: Sunglasses significantly reduced ocular symptoms (p = 0.002) and use of antihistamines (p = 0.009). CONCLUSION: Sunglasses are an inexpensive and simple treatment for patients with allergic conjunctivitis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Conjunctivitis, Allergic
Eye Protective Devices
Pollen/adverse effects
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use
Budesonide/therapeutic use
Conjunctivitis, Allergic/etiology
Conjunctivitis, Allergic/prevention & control
Female
Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating/therapeutic use
Humans
Loratadine/therapeutic use
Male
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal/drug therapy
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating); 51333-22-3 (Budesonide); 7AJO3BO7QN (Loratadine)
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/alr.21214

  3 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24210280
[Au] Autor:Biance-Valero E; Quiniou PY; Valero B; Navarrot JC; Soullié B
[Ad] Address:Fédération des laboratoires, hôpital d'instruction des armées Robert-Picqué, 351, route de Toulouse, CS 80002, 33882 Villenave d'Ornon cedex, France. Electronic address: elodie.biance@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Conjonctivite à gonocoque chez une jeune adulte. [Gonococcal conjunctivitis in a young woman].
[So] Source:J Fr Ophtalmol;36(10):e201-6, 2013 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1773-0597
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:We describe the management of a female patient who developed an uncomplicated unilateral purulent conjunctivitis with no other clinical signs. The typical clinical presentation and Gram stain of the discharge suggested gonococcal conjunctivitis, allowing treatment to be initiated. Indeed, a strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae resistant to penicillin and tetracycline was isolated. In collaboration with the patient's primary care physician, management included lavage of the infected eye, systemic antibiotic treatment with erythromycin and topical antibiotic treatment with azithromycin, followed by local steroid treatment in response to persistent hyperemia, which was discontinued and replaced by azithromycin again because of recurrent discharge. Eleven days after the first consultation, a complete cure was achieved without sequelae, and a final check to rule out a residual gonococcal carrier state is planned. Gonococcal conjunctivitis, a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency, is a potentially blinding sexually transmitted disease with which general practitioners and ophthalmologists are not well aquainted. Although rare in developed countries, its incidence is rising in parallel with the global recrudescence of gonococcal infections. This case of gonococcal conjunctivitis is discussed as a review of the clinical and biological elements necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic management, which must occur as early as possible, taking into account rapidly increasing gonococcal resistance to antimicrobial therapies, so as to interrupt spread of the disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Conjunctivitis, Bacterial/diagnosis
Conjunctivitis, Bacterial/microbiology
Gonorrhea/complications
Neisseria gonorrhoeae/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Azithromycin/therapeutic use
Conjunctivitis, Bacterial/drug therapy
Female
Gonorrhea/drug therapy
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 83905-01-5 (Azithromycin)
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131210
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 23815865
[Au] Autor:Eguchi H; Miyamoto T; Kuwahara T; Mitamura S; Mitamura Y
[Ti] Title:Infectious conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a bathroom.
[So] Source:BMC Res Notes;6:245, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:1756-0500
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The elucidation of the routes of transmission of a pathogen is crucial for the prevention of infectious diseases caused by bacteria that are not a resident in human tissue. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of suture-related conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for which we identified the transmission route using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). CASE PRESENTATION: A 38-year-old man, who had undergone surgery for glaucoma 2 years ago previously, presented with redness, discomfort, and mucopurulent discharge in the right eye. A 9-0 silk suture had been left on the conjunctiva. A strain of P. aeruginosa was isolated from a culture obtained from the suture, and the patient was therefore diagnosed with suture-related conjunctivitis caused by P. aeruginosa. The conjunctivitis was cured by the application of an antimicrobial ophthalmic solution and removal of the suture. We used PFGE to survey of the indoor and outdoor environments around the patient's house and office in order to elucidate the route of transmission of the infection. Three strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from the patient's indoor environment, and the isolate obtained from the patient's bathroom was identical to that from the suture. CONCLUSION: The case highlights the fact that an indoor environmental strain of P. aeruginosa can cause ocular infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/1756-0500-6-245

  5 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25036545
[Au] Autor:Borgman CJ
[Ad] Address:*OD, FAAO Southern College of Optometry, Memphis, Tennessee.
[Ti] Title:Proteus mirabilis and Its Role in Dacryocystitis.
[So] Source:Optom Vis Sci;91(9):e230-5, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1538-9235
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Dacryocystitis is a common inflammation of the lacrimal sac, usually from an underlying bacterial infection. Most cases can be attributed to common ocular flora such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pneumoniae; however, uncommon bacterial causes such as Proteus mirabilis can still occur. P. mirabilis is a gram-negative bacillus that is found abundantly in people who have undergone long-term catheterization and is uncommonly found in or around the eyes except in people who have undergone long-term catheterization. Proteus species can cause conjunctivitis, canaliculitis, and dacryocystitis and have the ability to manifest into preseptal cellulitis; therefore, timely recognition and treatment are important to prevent potential further complications. CASE REPORT: An 84-year-old white man had several recurrences of acute dacryocystitis that had marginal improvement with empiric antibiotic treatment. Resultant culture of the ocular discharge revealed an uncommon bacterium, P. mirabilis. Successful dosing of oral antibiotics resolved the infection but ultimately the patient required an external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) procedure to maintain patency of the nasolacrimal lacrimal system and prevent recurrence. At 3 months after external DCR, the patient was symptom free with no recurrences. CONCLUSIONS: Dacryocystitis has a distinctive clinical presentation and is usually easily treated when appropriate oral antibiotics are directed at the underlying pathogen. In nonresponsive cases, culturing of the ocular discharge should be performed to identify the underlying pathogen. Cases of dacryocystitis caused by Proteus species are usually responsive to several standard antibiotics used orally in eye care; however, culturing and susceptibility testing can streamline the diagnostic and management sequence considerably in unclear or unresponsive cases. Typically, patients with dacryocystitis return to normal after appropriate treatment, but chronic recurrences and epiphora are potential sequelae. Patients should be educated that a DCR surgical procedure may be needed to prevent future recurrences in some cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/OPX.0000000000000347

  6 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25115683
[Au] Autor:Gomes PJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Allergy, Ora, Inc, Andover, Massachusetts, USA.
[Ti] Title:Trends in prevalence and treatment of ocular allergy.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol;14(5):451-6, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1473-6322
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review describes recent findings and trends in prevalence and treatment of allergic ocular diseases. Although the major focus is on seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis, related disorders will also be considered. RECENT FINDINGS: Published reports from countries around the world suggest that the spectrum of atopic diseases, including seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis, is continuing its pattern of increasing prevalence, which has been well documented over the past few decades. In addition, although treatment modalities have focused on topical formulations including antihistamines and corticosteroids, there is a significant emphasis on immunotherapy as an alternative treatment modality, particularly in the USA. SUMMARY: Allergic conjunctivitis is a key component in the spectrum of allergic diseases that is sometimes collectively referred to as rhinoconjunctivitis. Because of its high prevalence worldwide, it exacts an increasing toll in terms of patient discomfort, morbidity, and loss of productivity. Current estimates suggest that at least 20% of the overall population suffers from some form of allergic conjunctivitis, many without ever seeking treatments. In addition, a significant proportion of patients experience chronic forms of allergy that are less responsive to existing therapies. Recent approval of immunotherapy-based treatments may address this therapeutic gap.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACI.0000000000000100

  7 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25102104
[Au] Autor:Syed BA; Kumar S; Bielory L
[Ad] Address:aIMS Health Limited, London, UK bRobert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.
[Ti] Title:Current options and emerging therapies for anterior ocular inflammatory disease.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol;14(5):485-9, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1473-6322
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Ophthalmic disorders are highly prevalent in the United States, with approximately 3.5 million individuals aged at least 40 either blind or having impaired vision. This article reviews the current leading agents and pipeline therapies for the treatment of anterior ocular inflammatory disease (AOID). RECENT FINDINGS: There has been great progress in the understanding of ocular pathophysiology in recent years. Although current treatments for AOID are effective and well tolerated in many patients, a continued demand persists for more efficacious alternatives to the limited modalities available to clinicians. SUMMARY: Several promising modalities for AOID, particularly for allergic conjunctivitis, immune treatments for uveitis and dry eye syndrome are in late-stage development that could offer optimal treatment paradigm once available in the clinic.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACI.0000000000000097

  8 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25061855
[Au] Autor:Dartt DA; Masli S
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Ophthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute/Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School bDepartment of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
[Ti] Title:Conjunctival epithelial and goblet cell function in chronic inflammation and ocular allergic inflammation.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol;14(5):464-70, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1473-6322
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although conjunctival goblet cells are a major cell type in ocular mucosa, their responses during ocular allergy are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the recent findings that provide key insights into the mechanisms by which their function and survival are altered during chronic inflammatory responses, including ocular allergy. RECENT FINDINGS: Conjunctiva represents a major component of the ocular mucosa that harbors specialized lymphoid tissue. Exposure of mucin-secreting goblet cells to allergic and inflammatory mediators released by the local innate and adaptive immune cells modulates proliferation, secretory function, and cell survival. Allergic mediators like histamine, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins directly stimulate goblet cell mucin secretion and consistently increase goblet cell proliferation. Goblet cell mucin secretion is also detectable in a murine model of allergic conjunctivitis. Additionally, primary goblet cell cultures allow evaluation of various inflammatory cytokines with respect to changes in goblet cell mucin secretion, proliferation, and apoptosis. These findings in combination with the preclinical mouse models help understand the goblet cell responses and their modulation during chronic inflammatory diseases, including ocular allergy. SUMMARY: Recent findings related to conjunctival goblet cells provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches, involving modulation of goblet cell mucin production, to improve treatment of ocular allergies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACI.0000000000000098

  9 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25054831
[Au] Autor:Erdinest N; Solomon A
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Topical immunomodulators in the management of allergic eye diseases.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol;14(5):457-63, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1473-6322
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Allergic eye diseases comprise a spectrum of diseases, with each condition being characterized by a complex immunopathology. The more severe and chronic conditions, such as vernal keratoconjunctivitis and atopic keratoconjunctivitis, involve predominantly mast cells and eosinophils, while also being associated with a preponderance of T cells. Treatment with topical antihistamines or mast cell stabilizers is often unsatisfactory, and therapy depends on topical corticosteroids. Corticosteroids have significant side-effects with long-term use; therefore, they appear to be more appropriate for short-term pulse therapy. Immunomodulatory agents can also be used to inhibit T-cell activation and show encouraging results among patients with severe allergic eye conditions. The present review is an attempt to present a coherent picture of the recent investigations of topical immunomodulatory agents' therapy in severe allergic eye diseases, especially cyclosporine A and tacrolimus, and their mechanisms of action. RECENT FINDINGS: Immunomodulatory agents are commonly indicated for the treatment of severe and prolonged allergic conjunctivitis. This article reviews the recent studies of these drugs and the development of immunomodulatory treatments for severe allergic eye diseases. SUMMARY: Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus are currently available for the treatment of severe allergic conjunctivitis. These agents have led to improved therapeutic results for patients with severe and chronic allergic eye diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACI.0000000000000089

  10 / 12914 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25147716
[Au] Autor:Nejabat M; Salehi A; Noorani Azad P; Ashraf MJ
[Ad] Address:Research Center for Traditional Medicine and History of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran....
[Ti] Title:Effects of onion juice on the normal flora of eyelids and conjunctiva in an animal model.
[So] Source:Jundishapur J Microbiol;7(5):e9678, 2014 May.
[Is] ISSN:2008-3645
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Traditional medicine/complementary alternative medicine may suggest new ideas to modern medicine in order to face new challenges however these concepts should be acknowledged based on experimental studies. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to study the effects of onion (Allium cepa) juice on the normal flora of conjunctiva and eye lids, and to follow the histopathology changes of conjunctiva in an animal study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-four rabbits were randomly classified into three equal groups. Groups 1, 2 and 3 received fresh red onion juice, as an eye drop, into the right eye twice daily for; one week, one month, and two months, respectively. Microbiological sampling by sterile swabs was performed before and after the intervention. Cultural characteristics, including the growth rate and the kind of organisms, are reported. At the end of the study, pathological samples were collected from the inferior fornix. RESULTS: After the intervention, the number of positive cultures in the samples, collected from both the conjunctiva and eyelid, had decreased. Group 3 demonstrated the lowest amount of growth after the administration of the onion juice and the bacterial isolation rates from each organism had decreased. All pathological samples revealed some degree of inflammation. There was no evidence of metaplasia or dysplasia. There was no significant difference between the growth rates of organisms in the experimental groups using statistical analysis. CONCLUSIONS: According to our experiment, onion has an inhibitory effect on the growth of normal eye flora; although the duration of onion juice instillation did not show any significant effect on the group results. Hence, this finding is an initiating point for further investigations into the antimicrobial properties of this herb to treat common eye infections, including conjunctivitis and blepharitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140822
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5812/jjm.9678


page 1 of 1292 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information