Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Conjunctivitis [Words]
References found : 13292 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1330 go to page                         

  1 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25950455
[Au] Autor:Wei CC; Lin CL; Shen TC; Kao CH
[Ad] Address:1] Children's Hospital, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan [2] College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan....
[Ti] Title:Neonatal jaundice and risks of childhood allergic diseases: a population-based cohort study.
[So] Source:Pediatr Res;78(2):223-30, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0447
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Only a few studies have systemically analyzed the association between neonatal jaundice and childhood-onset allergic diseases. METHODS: From 2000 to 2007, 27,693 neonates with newly diagnosed neonatal jaundice and 55,367 matched nonneonatal jaundice cohorts were identified. The incidences and hazard ratios (HRs) of five allergic diseases, namely allergic conjunctivitis (AC), allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, and urticaria, by the end of 2008 were calculated. RESULTS: The incidence density and HRs of the five allergic diseases were greater in the neonatal jaundice cohort than in the nonneonatal jaundice cohort, and the HRs declined modestly with age. The HRs for AR (HR = 2.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.43-2.59) and AD (HR = 2.51, 95% CI = 2.40-2.62) were the highest, and that for urticaria was the lowest (HR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.94-2.19). The HRs of allergic diseases were substantially greater for boys and those requiring phototherapy. The HRs of the allergic diseases, except urticaria (HR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.57-3.97), were not significantly different between the neonatal jaundice regardless of whether the patients received exchange transfusion. CONCLUSION: Neonatal jaundice is associated with the development of allergic diseases in early childhood.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/pr.2015.89

  2 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25323001
[Au] Autor:Potz-Biedermann C; Mehra T; Deuter C; Zierhut M; Schaller M
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tübingen, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Ophthalmic Rosacea: Case Report in a Child and Treatment Recommendations.
[So] Source:Pediatr Dermatol;32(4):522-5, 2015 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1525-1470
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report a rare case of rosacea with ocular involvement in a child that remitted with prolonged anti-inflammatory oral tetracycline therapy and provide general expert recommendations. A 14-year-old girl presented with discrete papules and pustules on both cheeks with blepharitis and conjunctivitis. Ophthalmologic examination confirmed bilateral severe blepharitis, as well as a corneal infiltrate in the right eye with additional neovascularization. The diagnosis of rosacea with ocular involvement was made. In addition to the existing antibiotic and anti-inflammatory topical eye therapy, systemic treatment with minocycline 50 mg twice a day was started. After marked improvement, the dose was reduced to 50 mg once a day. After further amelioration, treatment was switched to maintenance therapy with 40 mg of prolonged-release doxycycline. Three years after a 12-month course of anti-inflammatory therapy, the patient remained recurrence free.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/pde.12419

  3 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26185412
[Au] Autor:Chigbu DI; Coyne AM
[Ad] Address:Pennsylvania College of Optometry Salus University, Elkins Park, PA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Update and clinical utility of alcaftadine ophthalmic solution 0.25% in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis.
[So] Source:Clin Ophthalmol;9:1215-25, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1177-5467
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Allergic disorders of the ocular surface are primarily characterized as IgE- and/or T-lymphocyte-mediated disorders that affect the cornea, conjunctiva, and eyelid. Approximately 40% of individuals in the developed countries have allergic conjunctivitis, and as such, it is the most common form of ocular allergy. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is the most prevalent type of allergic conjunctivitis that impacts the quality of life of patients. This article reviews the pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, clinical efficacy, and safety of alcaftadine. Histamine and the pathological mechanism of ocular allergy will be briefly reviewed with the intent of providing a background for the detailed discussion on the clinical utility of alcaftadine in allergic conjunctivitis. The Medline PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were used to search for evidence-based literature on histamine and immunopathological mechanism of allergic conjunctivitis, as well as on pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and clinical efficacy of alcaftadine. The treatment and management goals of allergic conjunctivitis are to prevent or minimize the inflammatory cascade associated with allergic response in the early stages of the pathological mechanism. It is of note that activation of histamine receptors on immune and nonimmune cells are associated with allergen-induced inflammation of the conjunctiva and its associated ocular allergic manifestations, including itching, edema, hyperemia, and tearing. Alcaftadine is an efficacious multiple action antiallergic therapeutic agent with inverse agonist activity on H1, H2, and H4 receptors, as well as anti-inflammatory and mast cell stabilizing effects that could provide therapeutic benefits to patients with allergic conjunctivitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150718
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/OPTH.S63790

  4 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text

[PMID]: 25999672
[Au] Autor:Magaña D; Aguilar G; Linares M; Ayala-Balboa J; Santacruz C; Chávez R; Estrada-Parra S; Garfias Y; Lascurain R; Jiménez-Martínez MC
[Ad] Address:Department of Immunology and Research Unit, Institute of Ophthalmology "Conde de Valenciana Foundation," México, D.F....
[Ti] Title:Intracellular IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ as the main characteristic of CD4+CD30+ T cells after allergen stimulation in patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis.
[So] Source:Mol Vis;21:443-50, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1090-0535
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a severe form of allergic conjunctivitis, in which inflammatory infiltrates of the conjunctiva are characterized by CD3+ and CD30+ cells. Until today, the functional involvement of CD30+ T cells in VKC was unclear. Our aim was to evaluate the functional characteristics of CD30+ T cells after allergen stimulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with VKC. METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients at the Institute of Ophthalmology with active forms of VKC were included. RESULTS: After allergen stimulation, we observed the frequency of CD30+ T cells increased compared with non-stimulated cells (p<0.0001). The CD30+ T cells responded to the specific allergen-inducing expression of intracellular interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) compared with the CD30- T cells (p<0.0001). Increased early secretion of soluble CD30 was observed in the supernatant of the cultured cells from patients with keratoconjunctivitis, compared with healthy controls (p=0.03). Blockage with IL-4 significantly diminished CD30 frequency in the allergen-stimulated cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that after allergenic stimulation, CD4+CD30+ cells are the most important source of IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ. IL-4 acts as an activation loop that increases CD30 expression on T cells after specific stimulation. These findings suggest that CD4+CD30+ T cells are effector cells and play a significant role in the immune pathogenic response in patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Cu] Class update date: 150527
[Lr] Last revision date:150527
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25789999
[Au] Autor:PLOS ONE Staff
[Ti] Title:Correction: Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in pollen-induced allergic conjunctivitis and pollen dermatitis in mice.
[So] Source:PLoS One;10(3):e0122546, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:PUBLISHED ERRATUM
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150511
[Lr] Last revision date:150511
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150320
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122546

  6 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25647395
[Au] Autor:Nagata Y; Yoshihisa Y; Matsunaga K; Rehman MU; Kitaichi N; Kitaichi N; Shimizu T
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in pollen-induced allergic conjunctivitis and pollen dermatitis in mice.
[So] Source:PLoS One;10(2):e0115593, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pollen is a clinically important airborne allergen and one of the major causes of allergic conjunctivitis. A subpopulation of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are also known to have exacerbated skin eruptions on the face, especially around the eyelids, after contact with pollen. This pollen-induced skin reaction is now known as pollen dermatitis. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pluripotent cytokine that plays an essential role in allergic inflammation. Recent findings suggest that MIF is involved in several allergic disorders, including AD. In this study, MIF knockout (KO), MIF transgenic (Tg) and WT littermate mice were immunized with ragweed (RW) pollen or Japanese cedar (JC) pollen and challenged via eye drops. We observed that the numbers of conjunctiva- and eyelid-infiltrating eosinophils were significantly increased in RW and JC pollen-sensitized MIF Tg compared with WT mice or MIF KO mice. The mRNA expression levels of eotaxin, interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 were increased in pollen-sensitized eyelid skin sites of MIF Tg mice. An in vitro analysis revealed that high eotaxin expression was induced in dermal fibroblasts by MIF combined with stimulation of IL-4 or IL-13. This eotaxin expression was inhibited by the treatment with CD74 siRNA in fibroblasts. These findings indicate that MIF can induce eosinophil accumulation in the conjunctiva and eyelid dermis exposed to pollen. Therefore, targeted inhibition of MIF might result as a new option to control pollen-induced allergic conjunctivitis and pollen dermatitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1502
[Cu] Class update date: 150213
[Lr] Last revision date:150213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0115593

  7 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25147323
[Au] Autor:Fitzsimons R; van der Poel LA; Thornhill W; du Toit G; Shah N; Brough HA
[Ad] Address:Children's Allergy Service, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Department of Asthma, Allergy and Respiratory Science, King's College London, London, UK....
[Ti] Title:Antihistamine use in children.
[So] Source:Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed;100(3):122-31, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1743-0593
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This review provides an overview of the use of antihistamines in children. We discuss types of histamine receptors and their mechanism of action, absorption, onset and duration of action of first-generation and second-generation H(1)-antihistamines, as well as elimination of H(1)-antihistamines which has important implications for dosing in children. The rationale for the use of H(1)-antihistamines is explored for the relief of histamine-mediated symptoms in a variety of allergic conditions including: non-anaphylactic allergic reactions, atopic eczema (AE), allergic rhinitis (AR) and conjunctivitis, chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) and whether they have a role in the management of intermittent and chronic cough, anaphylaxis, food protein-induced gastrointestinal allergy and asthma prevention. Second-generation H(1)-antihistamines are preferable to first-generation H(1)-antihistamines in the management of non-anaphylactic allergic reactions, AR, AE and CSU due to: their better safety profile, including minimal cognitive and antimuscarinic side effects and a longer duration of action. We offer some guidance as to the choices of H(1)-antihistamines available currently and their use in specific clinical settings. H(1)-antihistamine class, availability, licensing, age and dosing administration, recommended indications in allergic conditions and modalities of delivery for the 12 more commonly used H(1)-antihistamines in children are also tabulated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1136/archdischild-2013-304446

  8 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24523487
[Au] Autor:Drew RJ; Cole TS; Newman W
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK.
[Ti] Title:How to use... eye swabs.
[So] Source:Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed;100(3):155-61, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1743-0593
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Conjunctivitis is a very common presentation to general practitioners and general paediatricians. The investigation of conjunctivitis can be a significant cost to microbiology laboratories due to the high volume of samples that can be submitted, particularly from patients in the community. The key issue is to send eye swabs in clinical situations where it can make a difference to management, and limiting the use of eye swabs in routine cases of conjunctivitis which are likely to be due to viruses. For investigation of neonatal conjunctivitis we recommend sending a bacterial swab for routine culture, and also a swab for molecular detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In older children with mild conjunctivitis no swab is necessary unless there is marked conjunctival injection. In this article we also highlight patient populations that require specialist tests to be sent as part of their assessment such as contact lens wearers and sexually active teenagers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1136/archdischild-2013-305271

  9 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 25843432
[Au] Autor:Wei CC; Lin CL; Shen TC; Sung FC
[Ad] Address:College of Medicine China Medical University.
[Ti] Title:Occurrence of common allergic diseases in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.
[So] Source:J Epidemiol;25(5):370-7, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1349-9092
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Clinical and immunological studies have consistently shown a possible link between atopy and idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). However, whether allergic diseases occur after INS develops is unknown. METHODS: From Taiwan's National Health Insurance database, 1340 children with newly diagnosed INS and 5360 non-INS matched controls were identified in 2000-2007. By the end of 2008, the incidences and hazard ratios of four allergic diseases (allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma) were calculated. RESULTS: The incidence rates of all four allergic diseases were greater in the INS cohort than in the non-INS cohort in all age groups and decreased sharply as age increased in both cohorts. Children with INS had the highest adjusted hazard ratio (4.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.50-6.83) for atopic dermatitis and the lowest adjusted hazard ratio (1.71; 95% CI, 1.39-2.09) for allergic rhinitis. Most of the allergic diseases appeared within 2-6 months after INS developed, and the incidences declined with increasing follow-up duration. CONCLUSIONS: Allergic disorders are common in children with INS, especially within the first year after diagnosis. The role of INS in the development of allergic disorders should be elucidated to establish innovative disease intervention programs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypersensitivity/epidemiology
Nephrotic Syndrome/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Asthma/epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Conjunctivitis, Allergic/epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
National Health Programs
Rhinitis, Allergic/epidemiology
Taiwan/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150507
[Lr] Last revision date:150507
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150507
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2188/jea.JE20140167

  10 / 13292 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25663486
[Au] Autor:Simon RA; Dazy KM; Waldram JD
[Ad] Address:Division of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Scripps Clinic, 3811 Valley Centre Drive, San Diego, CA, 92130, USA, Simon.Ronald@scrippshealth.org.
[Ti] Title:Update on aspirin desensitization for chronic rhinosinusitis with polyps in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).
[So] Source:Curr Allergy Asthma Rep;15(3):508, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1534-6315
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a clinical condition which results in adverse upper and lower respiratory symptoms, particularly rhinitis, conjunctivitis, bronchospasm, and/or laryngospasm, following exposure to cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibiting drugs, namely aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). A provocative aspirin challenge is the gold standard for diagnosis of AERD. Aspirin desensitization and continuous aspirin therapy has been highly efficacious in those patients with suboptimal control of their disease on current available pharmacotherapy or those with other underlying conditions (i.e., cardiovascular disease) who may require frequent treatment with aspirin or NSAIDs. This review article focuses on aspirin desensitization and the management of patients with AERD with a particular emphasis on outcomes in those patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use
Aspirin/therapeutic use
Nasal Polyps/drug therapy
Respiration Disorders/chemically induced
Rhinitis/drug therapy
Sinusitis/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects
Aspirin/adverse effects
Chronic Disease
Desensitization, Immunologic
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); R16CO5Y76E (Aspirin)
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11882-014-0508-7


page 1 of 1330 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information