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[PMID]: 25229001
[Au] Autor:Park HJ; Lim HS; Park KH; Lee JH; Park JW; Hong CS
[Ad] Address:Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ; Institute of Allergy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Changes in allergen sensitization over the last 30 years in Korea respiratory allergic patients: a single-center.
[So] Source:Allergy Asthma Immunol Res;6(5):434-43, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2092-7355
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Determining the culprit allergen is important for the diagnosis and management of allergic diseases. The skin prick test (SPT) has been widely used to identify culprit allergens. Skin reactivity to allergens has changed due to changes in lifestyle and outdoor environments. Therefore, the aim of the present paper was to examine changes in allergen sensitization in Korea. METHODS: We enrolled 1,135 patients with respiratory allergic diseases who were diagnosed at Severance Hospital from January 2010 to December 2011. SPTs were performed with inhalant allergens, and were compared to our previous studies of the SPTs in the 1980s and the 1990s. RESULTS: In the 2010s, the SPT positive rate of allergic rhinitis or allergic conjunctivitis was higher than asthma without allergic rhinitis or allergic conjunctivitis. The SPT positive rate was decreased by increments of age (P value <0.01). Skin reactivity to tree pollens was significantly increased to 36.4% in the 2010s from 19.0% in the 1990s and 8.8% in the 1980s. Among tree pollens, skin reactivity to oak (4.7%->14.4%), birch (7.1%->13.6%), alder (6.3%->13.4%) and pine (2.9%->14.3%) was significantly increased in the 2010s compared with the 1990s, respectively. Current skin reactivity to grass pollens (13.9%) and weed pollens (27.0%) has significantly decreased since the 1990s (20.3%, 40.9%, respectively). Skin reactivity to house dust mites showed no difference between the 1990s (55.2%) and the 2010s (55.6%). Skin reactivity to dog (27.3%->20.7%) and cockroach (25.3%->12.3%) have significantly decreased in the 2010s in comparison with the 1990s. CONCLUSIONS: In light of the above results, we revealed the changes in skin reactivity to inhalant allergens that have occurred in Korean allergic patients over the past three decades. Since outdoor environmental factors such as the amount of pollen, global warming and plant distribution causes the changes in skin reactivity, further study and continuous close observation will be needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Cu] Class update date: 140919
[Lr] Last revision date:140919
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140917
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4168/aair.2014.6.5.434

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[PMID]: 24838028
[Au] Autor:Akesbi J; Nordmann JP
[Ad] Address:Service 2, centre hospitalier national des Quinze-Vingts, 28, rue de Charenton, 75012 Paris, France. Electronic address: akesbi@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Larves d'Oestrus Ovis responsables d'une conjonctivite après un séjour en Israël. [Oestrus Ovis larva infection presenting as conjunctivitis after a trip to Israel].
[So] Source:J Fr Ophtalmol;37(7):588, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1773-0597
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 12946 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24966111
[Au] Autor:Lachiewicz AM; Cianciolo R; Miller MB; Derebail VK
[Ad] Address:Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
[Ti] Title:Adenovirus causing fever, upper respiratory infection, and allograft nephritis complicated by persistent asymptomatic viremia.
[So] Source:Transpl Infect Dis;16(4):648-52, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1399-3062
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 20-year-old woman, with renal transplant complicated by recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, presented nearly 2 years after transplantation with fever, conjunctivitis, and sinus congestion. She was found to have severe adenovirus (ADV)-induced granulomatous interstitial nephritis, confirmed by immunohistochemical staining for ADV in the renal biopsy, without urinary symptoms, hematuria, or laboratory evidence of a change in allograft function. Fever, upper respiratory tract symptoms, and evidence of adenoviral infection in the allograft resolved with decreased immunosuppression and treatment with cidofovir and intravenous immunoglobulin. Creatinine rose during treatment and remained elevated, possibly related to cidofovir nephrotoxicity. Despite therapy and continued reduction in immunosuppression, asymptomatic low-level viremia persisted for a year. In renal transplant patients with ADV infection, allograft involvement should be highly suspected even without overt urinary symptoms or laboratory evidence of allograft dysfunction. Demonstration of allograft involvement may prompt alternative management that could limit continued allograft infection. No clear recommendations exist for management of asymptomatic ADV viremia in solid organ transplant patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/tid.12248

  4 / 12946 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24809415
[Au] Autor:Doi H; Kunikata H; Kato K; Nakazawa T
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Ophthalmologic examinations in areas of Miyagi Prefecture affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake.
[So] Source:JAMA Ophthalmol;132(7):874-6, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6173
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:IMPORTANCE: One month after the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, our clinic was granted free use of the Mission Vision Van, a customized bus airlifted to Japan. This mobile eye clinic made it possible for us to provide ophthalmologic examinations anywhere in the disaster zone in Miyagi Prefecture. OBSERVATIONS: This study included 731 patients who received treatment in the eye care van in Miyagi Prefecture between April 15 and May 29, 2011. We examined and cared for patients during 25 visits to 11 emergency districts during 15 clinic days. Of the 914 diagnoses we identified, 358 were refractive disorders (39.2%), which were the most common ocular diseases we observed; others included 155 (17.0%) cataracts, 106 (11.6%) dry eye, and 73 (8.0%) infectious diseases, such as conjunctivitis. Overall, we provided emergency prescriptions for 871 bottles of eyedrops comprising 222 prescriptions (25.5%) for dry eye, 189 (21.7%) for cataracts, and 107 (12.3%) for glaucoma. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: A substantial number of patients in the earthquake-damaged areas needed replacements for eyeglasses, contact lenses, and eyedrops. The mobile clinic appears to be a useful way to provide ophthalmologic examinations and support after a disaster.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration
Disasters
Earthquakes
Eye Diseases/epidemiology
Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data
Mobile Health Units/organization & administration
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Eye Diseases/diagnosis
Eye Diseases/therapy
Female
Humans
Infant
Japan/epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Sex Distribution
Vision Tests/methods
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140711
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.849

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[PMID]: 25229278
[Au] Autor:Anjos LM; Marcondes MB; Lima MF; Mondelli AL; Okoshi MP
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP, Brazil....
[Ti] Title:Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.
[So] Source:Rev Soc Bras Med Trop;47(4):409-13, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1678-9849
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A ß-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 12946 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24865691
[Au] Autor:Zuberbuhler B; Abedin A; Roudsari A
[Ad] Address:Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:A novel case of chronic conjunctivitis in a 58-year-old woman caused by Raoultella.
[So] Source:Infection;42(5):927-9, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0973
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 58-year-old woman presented to eye emergency with a chronic conjunctivitis which was diagnosed by laboratory microbiological testing to be due to the environmental pathogen Raoultella planticola. The organism was sensitive to Chloramphenicol and the patient made a rapid recovery on these drops. This is the first report of this organism infecting the eye.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s15010-014-0624-2

  7 / 12946 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24961872
[Au] Autor:Jones MP; Walker MM; Ford AC; Talley NJ
[Ad] Address:Psychology Department, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, USA.
[Ti] Title:The overlap of atopy and functional gastrointestinal disorders among 23,471 patients in primary care.
[So] Source:Aliment Pharmacol Ther;40(4):382-91, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2036
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Activation of the immune system has been demonstrated in atopy and functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Previous data from our group have suggested a connection between immune dysregulation, FGIDs and mood disorders. AIM: To investigate if these data translate to clinical practice and examine connections from the perspective of FGIDs to determine whether atopy and FGIDs are connected via mood disorders. METHODS: Evidence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD) and constipation was sought from the medical records of 30,000 primary care records over a minimum 5 year period. The same records yielded diagnoses of four atopic conditions (asthma, eczema, allergic rhinitis/hay fever and conjunctivitis). RESULTS: Atopic conditions were found in excess among all FGID groups considered when compared with controls. In the groups with IBS alone (OR = 1.43, 1.29-1.58), FD alone (OR = 1.41, 1.26-1.58) and those with multiple FGIDs (OR = 1.92, 1.75-2.12) there was elevated prevalence of asthma compared with controls without a FGID. Across disorders the excess was generally highest among patients diagnosed with multiple FGIDs (rhinitis/hay fever OR = 3.74, 3.32-4.20; conjunctivitis OR = 3.00, 2.49-3.62) and was only partly explained by a common association between both FGIDs and atopic conditions with mood disorders, although not for every atopic/FGID combination (rhinitis/hay fever OR = 2.60, 2.29-2.96, conjunctivitis OR = 2.34, 1.90-2.87). CONCLUSIONS: Irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia and constipation share an association with atopy that is only partly explained via a common connection with mood disorders. These data have important implications for understanding both the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders and development of new treatments.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Constipation/epidemiology
Dyspepsia/epidemiology
Hypersensitivity/epidemiology
Irritable Bowel Syndrome/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Constipation/complications
Dyspepsia/complications
Female
Humans
Irritable Bowel Syndrome/complications
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140721
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/apt.12846

  8 / 12946 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25045337
[Au] Autor:Shafferman A; Birmingham JD; Cron RQ
[Ad] Address:University of Alabama School of Medicine, 1720 2nd Avenue South FOT 1203, Birmingham, AL 35294-3412, UK.
[Ti] Title:High dose anakinra for treatment of severe neonatal Kawasaki disease: a case report.
[So] Source:Pediatr Rheumatol Online J;12:26, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1546-0096
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report an 11-week-old female who presented with Kawasaki disease (KD) complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). The infant presented to the hospital with persistent fever, cough, diarrhea, and emesis, among other symptoms. Her condition quickly began to decompensate, and she developed classic features (conjunctivitis, rash, cracked lips, distal extremity edema) prompting a diagnosis of acute KD. The patient was treated with standard therapy for KD including three doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), aspirin, and high dose glucocorticoids with no change in her condition. Due to a high suspicion for MAS, high dose anakinra therapy was initiated resulting in dramatic clinical improvements. She also received one dose of infliximab for concern for coronary artery changes, and over the course of several months, anakinra and high dose glucocorticoids were tapered. Nearly complete reversal of echocardiogram changes were observed after 8 months, and the infant is now off all immunosuppressive therapy. In this case report, we briefly review the importance of early recognition of MAS in pediatric patient populations with rheumatic diseases, and we suggest early initiation of anakinra therapy as a rapid and effective treatment option.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/1546-0096-12-26

  9 / 12946 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24619168
[Au] Autor:Sul S; Korkmaz S; Novruzlu S
[Ad] Address:*Department of Ophthalmology, Yatagan State Hospital, Mugla, Turkey; †Department of Ophthalmology, Düzce State Hospital, Düzce, Turkey; and ‡Department of Ophthalmology, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Seasonal effects on pterygium surgery outcome: implications for the role of sunlight exposure.
[So] Source:Cornea;33(5):504-6, 2014 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4798
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare the results of pterygium surgery in patients when performed in the summer with the results of surgery performed in the winter. METHODS: This retrospective study enrolled 55 eyes of 53 patients with primary pterygia who underwent a surgery between December 2011 and January 2012 (winter group, 32 eyes) or between June and July 2012 (summer group, 23 eyes). All the patients were followed up for at least 1 year. Pterygium recurrence, ocular discomfort, persistent conjunctival inflammation, and graft complications were evaluated postoperatively. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age or gender. All the patients were farmers in rural areas. The overall pterygium recurrence rate was 14.5% (8 of 55 eyes). The recurrence rate in the summer group was significantly higher than in the winter group (26.1% vs. 6.2%, P = 0.048). Persistent conjunctival inflammation was also significantly higher in the summer group than in the winter group (30.4% vs. 6.2%, P = 0.022). Pterygium recurrence was significantly higher in eyes with persistent conjunctival inflammation than in eyes without inflammation (66.6% vs. 4.3%, P < 0.001). Mild and moderate ocular discomfort was significantly more frequent in the summer group than in the winter group (69.5% vs. 34.3%, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Pterygium recurrence rates were higher, and postsurgical discomfort was more common when pterygium surgery was performed in the summer compared with that in the winter, potentially because of the increased exposure to sunlight during the summer.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pterygium/surgery
Seasons
Sunlight/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Conjunctivitis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures
Pterygium/diagnosis
Pterygium/etiology
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Rural Population
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140401
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICO.0000000000000097

  10 / 12946 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24608251
[Au] Autor:Lim DH; Kim J; Lee JH; Chung ES; Chung TY
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:A case of corneal endothelial dysfunction due to coxsackievirus A24 corneal endotheliitis after cataract surgery.
[So] Source:Cornea;33(5):533-5, 2014 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4798
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Corneal endotheliitis causes endothelial decompensation and is associated with significant visual impairment. The goal of this article is to report a case of corneal endotheliitis associated with coxsackievirus A24 infection after cataract surgery in a patient who had no previous symptoms indicative of conjunctivitis. METHODS: A 55-year-old man was admitted for cataract surgery when acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis was prevalent. Because he did not show any signs of suspected conjunctivitis, the cataract surgery was performed. No intraoperative complications occurred, and he was discharged 1 day after the surgery. Three days later, he visited our clinic with complaints of ocular pain and decreased vision in the left eye. Slit-lamp examination showed corneal stromal edema and mild inflammatory reaction in the anterior chamber. On postoperative day 7, anterior chamber irrigation and viral culture from the aqueous humor sample were performed. RESULTS: Coxsackievirus A24 was detected in the viral culture. Electron photomicroscopic examination with immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of viral antigen. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of corneal endotheliitis caused by coxsackievirus A24 confirmed by viral antigen detection in the aqueous humor of an affected eye.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coxsackievirus Infections/virology
Endothelium, Corneal/virology
Enterovirus C, Human/isolation & purification
Eye Infections, Viral/virology
Keratitis/virology
Phacoemulsification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antigens, Viral/analysis
Aqueous Humor/virology
Coxsackievirus Infections/diagnosis
Endothelium, Corneal/pathology
Eye Infections, Viral/diagnosis
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect
Humans
Keratitis/diagnosis
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Male
Middle Aged
Virus Cultivation
Visual Acuity
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antigens, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140401
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ICO.0000000000000096


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