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[PMID]: 29364942
[Au] Autor:Yuan X; Wen B
[Ad] Address:Center for Integrative Conservation, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Mengla, Yunnan, China.
[Ti] Title:Seed germination response to high temperature and water stress in three invasive Asteraceae weeds from Xishuangbanna, SW China.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191710, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Crassocephalum crepidioides, Conyza canadensis, and Ageratum conyzoides are alien annuals naturalized in China, which produce a large number of viable seeds every year. They widely grow in Xishuangbanna, becoming troublesome weeds that compete with crops for water and nutrients. As seed germination is among the most important life-stages which contribute to plant distribution and invasiveness, its adaptation to temperature and water stress were investigated in these three species. Results showed that: (1) These three species have wide temperature ranges to allow seed germination, i.e., high germination and seedling percentages were achieved between 15°C and 30°C, but germination was seriously inhibited at 35°C; only A. conyzoides demonstrated relative preference for warmer temperatures with approximately 25% germination and seedling percentage at 35°C; (2) light was a vital germination prerequisite for C. crepidioides and A. conyzoides, whereas most C. canadensis seeds germinated in full darkness; (3) Although all three species have good adaptation to bare ground habitat characterized by high temperatures and water stress, including their tolerance to soil surface temperatures of 70°C in air-dried seeds, A. conyzoides seeds exhibited higher tolerance to both continuous and daily periodic high-temperature treatment at 40°C, and to water restriction (e.g., ca. 65% seeds germinated to -0.8 MPa created by NaCl), which is consistent with their field behavior in Xishuangbanna. This study suggests that seed high-temperature tolerance contributes to the weed attributes of these three species, and that adaptation to local micro-habitats is a critical determinant for invasiveness of an alien plant.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Asteraceae/physiology
Germination
Hot Temperature
Plant Weeds/physiology
Seeds/physiology
Stress, Physiological
Water
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Asteraceae/embryology
China
Introduced Species
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:059QF0KO0R (Water)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191710

  2 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29479817
[Au] Autor:Amaro-Blanco I; Fernández-Moreno PT; Osuna-Ruiz MD; Bastida F; De Prado R
[Ad] Address:Agrarian Research Center "Finca La Orden" Valdesequera, Badajoz, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Mechanisms of glyphosate resistance and response to alternative herbicide-based management in populations of the three Conyza species introduced in Southern Spain.
[So] Source:Pest Manag Sci;, 2018 Feb 25.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4998
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In perennial crops, the most common method of weed control is to spray herbicides, and glyphosate has long been the first choice of farmers. Three species of the genus Conyza are among the most problematic weeds for farmers, exhibiting resistance to glyphosate. The objectives of this work were to evaluate resistance levels and mechanisms, and to test chemical control alternatives in putative resistant (R) populations of Conyza bonariensis, Conyza canadensis and Conyza sumatrensis. RESULTS: Plants of the three R-populations of Conyza spp. survived high doses of glyphosate compared to plants of susceptible (S) populations. The rate of movement of C glyphosate out of treated leaves in plants of S-populations was higher than in plants of R-populations. Only in plants of the R-population of C. sumatrensis contained the known target-site 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase mutation Pro-106-Thr. Field responses to the different alternative herbicide treatments tested indicated injury and high effectiveness in most cases. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that non-target-site resistant (NTSR) mechanisms explain resistance in C. bonariensis and C. canadensis, whereas both NTSR and target-site resistant (TSR) mechanisms contribute to resistance in C. sumatrensis. The results obtained in the field trials suggest that the resistance problem can be solved through Integrated Weed Management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ps.4896

  3 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29193675
[Au] Autor:Hereward JP; Werth JA; Thornby DF; Keenan M; Chauhan BS; Walter GH
[Ad] Address:School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Gene expression in response to glyphosate treatment in fleabane (Conyza bonariensis) - glyphosate death response and candidate resistance genes.
[So] Source:Pest Manag Sci;, 2017 Nov 28.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4998
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This study takes a whole-transcriptome approach to assess gene expression changes in response to glyphosate treatment in glyphosate-resistant fleabane. We assessed gene expression changes in both susceptible and resistant lines so that the glyphosate death response could be quantified, and constitutively expressed candidate resistance genes identified. There are three copies of the glyphosate target site (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate; EPSPS) gene in Conyza and because Conyza bonariensis is allohexaploid, there is a baseline nine copies of the gene in any individual. RESULTS: Many genes were differentially expressed in response to glyphosate treatment. Known resistance mutations are present in EPSPS2 but they are present in a glyphosate-susceptible line as well as resistant lines and therefore not sufficient to confer resistance. EPSPS1 is expressed four times more than EPSPS2, further reducing the overall contribution of these mutations. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that glyphosate resistance in C. bonariensis is not the result of EPSPS mutations or overexpression, but due to a non-target-site mechanism. A large number of genes are affected by glyphosate treatment. We present a list of candidate non-target-site-resistance (NTSR) genes in fleabane for future studies into these mechanisms. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ps.4804

  4 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29126952
[Au] Autor:El-Hefny M; Ashmawy NA; Salem MZM; Salem AZM
[Ad] Address:Department of Floriculture, Ornamental Horticulture and Garden Design, Faculty of Agriculture (El-Shatby), Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Antibacterial activities of the phytochemicals-characterized extracts of Callistemon viminalis, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Conyza dioscoridis against the growth of some phytopathogenic bacteria.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;113:348-356, 2017 Nov 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Three bacterial isolates were isolated from infected potato tubers showing soft and brown rots like symptoms as well as one isolate from infected peach tree showing crown gall symptom. The morphological, biochemical and molecular assays proved that bacterial isolates belonging to Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, Ralstonia solanacearum, Dickeya spp. and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The acetone (AcE) and n-butanol (ButE) extracts of Callistemon viminalis flowers and essential oil from aerial parts of Conyza dioscoridis as well as ButE of Eucalyptus camaldulensis bark are evaluated at different concentrations against the growth of the isolated bacteria. The diameter of inhibition zone (IZ) and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) are compared. Results indicated that the highest IZ values were 20.0 mm and 18.3 mm for E. camaldulensis bark ButE and C. viminalis flower ButE, respectively, against P. carotovorum; 16.3 mm and 16.0 mm for E. camaldulensis bark ButE and C. viminalis flower ButE, respectively, against R. solanacearum; 18.5 mm for C. viminalis flower AcE and C. dioscoridis aerial parts EO against Dickeya spp.; and 15.0 mm for C. viminalis flower AcE against A. tumefaciens. MICs ranged from <16 µg/mL for D. solani to >4000 µg/mL for A. tumefaciens. It was proved that C. viminalis flowers AcE contains mainly 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (20.6%), palmitic acid (18.5%), and pyrogallol (16.4%); while C. viminalis flower ButE contains palmitic acid (36.3%), 2-hydroxymyristic acid (9.4%), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (7.2%), and shikimic acid (6.6%); whereas E. camaldulensis bark ButE contains 8-nonynoic acid methyl ester (45.6), camphor (30.9%), menthol (8.8%), and 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) (8.2%), whilst the EO of C. dioscoridis aerial parts comprises Z-(13,14-epoxy)tetradec-11-en-1-ol acetate (11.6%), γ-elemene (10.2%), tau.-muurolol (7.1%), and cadina-3,9-diene (4.7%). It can be concluded that phytochemical extracts of C. viminalis, E. camaldulensis and C. dioscoridis demonstrated strong to moderate antibacterial effects against the studied plant bacterial pathogens.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171124
[Lr] Last revision date:171124
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28864886
[Au] Autor:El-Seedi HR; Azeem M; Khalil NS; Sakr HH; Khalifa SAM; Awang K; Saeed A; Farag MA; AlAjmi MF; Pålsson K; Borg-Karlson AK
[Ad] Address:Division of Pharmacognosy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Biomedical Centre, Uppsala University, Box 574, 751 23, Uppsala, Sweden. hesham.el-seedi@fkog.uu.se.
[Ti] Title:Essential oils of aromatic Egyptian plants repel nymphs of the tick Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae).
[So] Source:Exp Appl Acarol;73(1):139-157, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1572-9702
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Due to the role of Ixodes ricinus (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) in the transmission of many serious pathogens, personal protection against bites of this tick is essential. In the present study the essential oils from 11 aromatic Egyptian plants were isolated and their repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs was evaluated Three oils (i.e. Conyza dioscoridis L., Artemisia herba-alba Asso and Calendula officinalis L.) elicited high repellent activity in vitro of 94, 84.2 and 82%, respectively. The most active essential oil (C. dioscoridis) was applied in the field at a concentration of 6.5 µg/cm and elicited a significant repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs by 61.1%. The most repellent plants C. dioscoridis, C. officinalis and A. herba-alba yielded essential oils by 0.17, 0.11 and 0.14%, respectively. These oils were further investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. α-Cadinol (10.7%) and hexadecanoic acid (10.5%) were the major components of C. dioscoridis whereas in C. officinalis, α-cadinol (21.2%) and carvone (18.2%) were major components. Artemisia herba-alba contained piperitone (26.5%), ethyl cinnamate (9.5%), camphor (7.7%) and hexadecanoic acid (6.9%). Essential oils of these three plants have a potential to be used for personal protection against tick bites.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10493-017-0165-3

  6 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28700644
[Au] Autor:Moretti ML; Alárcon-Reverte R; Pearce S; Morran S; Hanson BD
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Transcription of putative tonoplast transporters in response to glyphosate and paraquat stress in Conyza bonariensis and Conyza canadensis and selection of reference genes for qRT-PCR.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(7):e0180794, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Herbicide resistance is a challenge for modern agriculture further complicated by cases of resistance to multiple herbicides. Conyza bonariensis and Conyza canadensis are invasive weeds of field crops, orchards, and non-cropped areas in many parts of the world. In California, USA, Conyza populations resistant to the herbicides glyphosate and paraquat have recently been described. Although the mechanism conferring resistance to glyphosate and paraquat in these species was not elucidated, reduced translocation of these herbicides was observed under experimental conditions in both species. Glyphosate and paraquat resistance associated with reduced translocation are hypothesized to be a result of sequestration of herbicides into the vacuole, with the possible involvement of over-expression of genes encoding tonoplast transporters of ABC-transporter families in cases of glyphosate resistance or cationic amino acid transporters (CAT) in cases of paraquat resistance. However, gene expression in response to herbicide treatment has not been studied in glyphosate and paraquat resistant populations. In the current study, we evaluated the transcript levels of genes possibly involved in resistance using real-time PCR. First, we evaluated eight candidate reference genes following herbicide treatment and selected three genes that exhibited stable expression profiles; ACTIN, HEAT-SHOCK-PROTEIN-70, and CYCLOPHILIN. The reference genes identified here can be used for further studies related to plant-herbicide interactions. We used these reference genes to assay the transcript levels of EPSPS, ABC transporters, and CAT in response to herbicide treatment in susceptible and resistant Conyza spp. lines. No transcription changes were observed in EPSPS or CAT genes after glyphosate or paraquat treatment, suggesting that these genes are not involved in the resistance mechanism. Transcription of the two ABC transporter genes increased following glyphosate treatment in all Conyza spp. lines. Transcription of ABC transporters also increased after paraquat treatment in all three lines of C. bonariensis. However, in C. canadensis, paraquat treatment increased transcription of only one ABC transporter gene in the susceptible line. The increase in transcription of ABC transporters after herbicide treatment is likely a stress response based on similar response observed across all Conyza lines regardless of resistance or sensitivity to glyphosate or paraquat, thus these genes do not appear to be directly involved in the mechanism of resistance in Conyza spp.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Conyza/drug effects
Conyza/metabolism
Glycine/analogs & derivatives
Paraquat/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Actins/genetics
Actins/metabolism
Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic/genetics
Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic/metabolism
Conyza/genetics
Cyclophilins/genetics
Cyclophilins/metabolism
Glycine/pharmacology
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism
Plant Proteins/genetics
Plant Proteins/metabolism
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Actins); 0 (Amino Acid Transport Systems, Basic); 0 (HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins); 0 (Plant Proteins); 4632WW1X5A (glyphosate); EC 5.2.1.- (Cyclophilins); PLG39H7695 (Paraquat); TE7660XO1C (Glycine)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170925
[Lr] Last revision date:170925
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170713
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0180794

  7 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28344494
[Au] Autor:El-Meligy RM; Awaad AS; Soliman GA; Kenawy SA; Alqasoumi SI
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Desert Research Center, Cairo, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Prophylactic and curative anti-ulcerogenic activity and the possible mechanisms of action of some desert plants.
[So] Source:Saudi Pharm J;25(3):387-396, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1319-0164
[Cp] Country of publication:Saudi Arabia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study aimed to evaluate the anti-ulcerogenic activities and the possible mechanisms of action of seven desert plants from different families. (L.) Desf. (Asteraceae), L. (Euphorpiaceae), L., lanigera L. (Lamiaceae), L., Linn. (Solanaceae) and (Del.) Hayne. (Asclepiadaceae), were tested using prophylactic and curative models of absolute ethanol-induced ulcer, at three doses (125, 250 & 500 mg/kg) of each extract. The investigated extracts possessed dose dependent anti-ulcerogenic activities in both models, with LD higher than 5 g/kg. The most effective extracts were and with percent protection of control ulcer; 91.1% and 85.4% respectively. The antisecretory activity of both and appears to be mainly related to the suppression of gastrin release. The potential radical (DPPH) scavenging activities of the investigated extracts were well supported with the reduction in gastric MDA (50.6% and 43.3%) and enhancing the level of reduced GSH (2.84, 2.59 mg/g tissue) for and respectively. In addition, suppression of the inflammatory mediator TNF-α may be one of the possible mechanisms of action. The alcohol extracts of and showed no alteration on liver and kidney functions. Phytochemical screening of the investigated extracts revealed the presence of flavonoids, tannins and sterols which could be related to the activities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.jsps.2016.10.008

  8 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28198407
[Au] Autor:González-Torralva F; Brown AP; Chivasa S
[Ad] Address:Department of Biosciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Comparative proteomic analysis of horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes identifies candidate proteins for glyphosate resistance.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;7:42565, 2017 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Emergence of glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes is an example of how unrelenting use of a single mode of action herbicide in agricultural weed control drives genetic adaptation in targeted species. While in other weeds glyphosate resistance arose from target site mutation or target gene amplification, the resistance mechanism in horseweed uses neither of these, being instead linked to reduced herbicide uptake and/or translocation. The molecular components underpinning horseweed glyphosate-resistance remain unknown. Here, we used an in vitro leaf disc system for comparative analysis of proteins extracted from control and glyphosate-treated tissues of glyphosate-resistant and glyphosate-susceptible biotypes. Analysis of shikimic acid accumulation, ABC-transporter gene expression, and cell death were used to select a suitable glyphosate concentration and sampling time for enriching proteins pivotal to glyphosate resistance. Protein gel analysis and mass spectrometry identified mainly chloroplast proteins differentially expressed between the biotypes before and after glyphosate treatment. Chloroplasts are the organelles in which the shikimate pathway, which is targeted by glyphosate, is located. Calvin cycle enzymes and proteins of unknown function were among the proteins identified. Our study provides candidate proteins that could be pivotal in engendering resistance and implicates chloroplasts as the primary sites driving glyphosate-resistance in horseweed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170223
[Lr] Last revision date:170223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep42565

  9 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27979664
[Au] Autor:Ma L; Liu H; Qin P; Hu C; Man S; Li Y; Liu Z; Liu Z; Diao A
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Industrial Fermentation Microbiology, Ministry of Education, School of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin, 300457, China; Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industry Microbiology, School of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Ti
[Ti] Title:Saponin fraction isolated from Conyza blinii H.Lév. demonstrates strong anti-cancer activity that is due to its NF-κB inhibition.
[So] Source:Biochem Biophys Res Commun;483(1):779-785, 2017 Jan 29.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2104
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CBS (Conyza blinii saponin) is the total triterpenoidal saponins of Conyza blinii H.Lév which is a type of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). We have discovered that CBS has a profound cytostatic activity against a range of solid tumour cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We also confirm that the cytostatic activity of CBS originates from its apoptosis induction effect. Additionally, we use immunoblot to find out that the apoptosis induction effect of CBS is attributable to the activation of mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistic study demonstrates that CBS is an effective NF-κB inhibitor. It inhibits p65 nuclear translocation and NF-κB downstream gene expression, including XIAP, survivin, Bcl-xL, COX-2, cyclin D1, MMP-2, MMP-9 in HeLa cells. Tumour xenografted animal models verify the anti-cancer efficacy in vivo. Tumour growth is significantly repressed in two CBS-treated groups compared with the controls (P < 0.001). CBS treatment (i.g.) leads to a 48.5% and 57.0% reduction in terms of tumour weight for the 10 and 20 mg/kg dosed groups respectively. Also no apparent observable adverse effects can be seen. These results suggest that CBS obliterate tumour, at least in part due to its NF-κB inhibition, which creates potential for CBS to be developed as a practical cancer treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology
Conyza/chemistry
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology
NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors
Saponins/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry
Antineoplastic Agents/isolation & purification
Cell Line, Tumor
Chemical Fractionation
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/chemistry
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/isolation & purification
Humans
Medicine, Chinese Traditional
NF-kappa B/metabolism
Protein Transport/drug effects
Saponins/chemistry
Saponins/isolation & purification
Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents); 0 (Drugs, Chinese Herbal); 0 (NF-kappa B); 0 (Saponins)
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170529
[Lr] Last revision date:170529
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161217
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 162 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27098558
[Au] Autor:Kleinman Z; Rubin B
[Ad] Address:Robert H Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Non-target-site glyphosate resistance in Conyza bonariensis is based on modified subcellular distribution of the herbicide.
[So] Source:Pest Manag Sci;73(1):246-253, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4998
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Conyza spp. were the first broadleaf weeds reported to have evolved glyphosate resistance. Several mechanisms have been proposed for glyphosate resistance. In an effort to elucidate the mechanism of this resistance in Conyza bonariensis, possible target-site and non-target-site mechanisms were investigated in glyphosate-resistant (GR) C. bonariensis biotypes. RESULTS: Using differential glyphosate applications and analyses of shikimate accumulation, we followed the herbicide effect in different plant organs and monitored the herbicide's apparent mobility. We found high shikimate levels in the roots and young leaves of glyphosate-sensitive (GS) plants, regardless of the site of application, whereas in GR plants, shikimate accumulated mainly in treated young leaves. C-glyphosate studies, however, revealed the expected source-to-sink translocation pattern in both GS and GR plants. Sequencing of the appropriate EPSPS DNA fragments of GR and GS plants revealed no alteration at the Pro106 position. CONCLUSION: These data support the hypothesis that the glyphosate resistance of our C. bonariensis GR biotypes is associated with altered subcellular distribution of glyphosate, which keeps the herbicide sequestered away from the EPSPS target site in the chloroplast. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: 3-Phosphoshikimate 1-Carboxyvinyltransferase/physiology
Conyza/drug effects
Glycine/analogs & derivatives
Herbicide Resistance/genetics
Herbicides/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 3-Phosphoshikimate 1-Carboxyvinyltransferase/genetics
3-Phosphoshikimate 1-Carboxyvinyltransferase/metabolism
Conyza/genetics
Glycine/metabolism
Glycine/pharmacology
Herbicides/metabolism
Sequence Analysis, Protein
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Herbicides); 4632WW1X5A (glyphosate); EC 2.5.1.19 (3-Phosphoshikimate 1-Carboxyvinyltransferase); TE7660XO1C (Glycine)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170306
[Lr] Last revision date:170306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160422
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ps.4293


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