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[PMID]: 29375129
[Au] Autor:Pearl JE; Das M; Cooper AM
[Ad] Address:Leicester Tuberculosis Research Group (LTBRG), Department of Infection Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.
[Ti] Title:Immunological roulette: Luck or something more? Considering the connections between host and environment in TB.
[So] Source:Cell Mol Immunol;15(3):226-232, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2042-0226
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Accurate prediction of which patient will progress from a sub-clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to active tuberculosis represents an elusive, yet critical, clinical research objective. From the individual perspective, progression can be considered to be the product of a series of unfortunate events or even a run of bad luck. Here, we identify the subtle physiological relationships that can influence the odds of progression to active TB and how this progression may reflect directed dysbiosis in a number of interrelated systems. Most infected individuals who progress to disease have apparently good immune responses, but these responses are, at times, compromised by either local or systemic environmental factors. Obvious disease promoting processes, such as tissue-damaging granulomata, usually manifest in the lung, but illness is systemic. This apparent dichotomy between local and systemic reflects a clear need to define the factors that promote progression to active disease within the context of the body as a physiological whole. We discuss aspects of the host environment that can impact expression of immunity, including the microbiome, glucocorticoid-mediated regulation, catecholamines and interaction between the gut, liver and lung. We suggest the importance of integrating precision medicine into our analyses of experimental outcomes such that apparently conflicting results are not contentious, but rather reflect the impact of these subtle relationships with our environment and microbiota.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/cmi.2017.145

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[PMID]: 29524033
[Au] Autor:Ammon B; Iroh P; Tiruneh Y; Li X; Montague BT; Rich JD; Nijhawan AE
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:HIV Care After Jail: Low Rates of Engagement in a Vulnerable Population.
[So] Source:J Urban Health;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1468-2869
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The criminal justice system is a critical area of focus to improve HIV outcomes and reduce health disparities. We analyzed demographic, incarceration, socioeconomic, and clinical data for HIV-positive persons released to the community from the Dallas County Jail (1450 incarcerations, 1111 unique individuals) between January 2011 and November 2013. The study population was 68% black and 14% Hispanic; overall linkage to care within 90 days of release was 34%. In adjusted analyses, Hispanics were more likely to link than whites (aOR 2.33 [95% CI: 1.55-3.50]), and blacks were as likely to link as whites (aOR 1.14 [95% CI: 0.84-1.56]). The majority of HIV-positive jail releases did not re-engage in HIV care after release, though Hispanics were twice as likely as other groups to link to care. Further efforts are needed to improve the transition from jail to community HIV care with particular attention to issues of housing, mental illness, and substance use.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11524-018-0231-0

  3 / 58791 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523900
[Au] Autor:Hughes CG; Patel MB; Brummel NE; Thompson JL; McNeil JB; Pandharipande PP; Jackson JC; Chandrasekhar R; Ware LB; Ely EW; Girard TD
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Anesthesiology Critical Care Medicine and Center for Health Services Research, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, USA. christopher.hughes@vanderbilt.edu.
[Ti] Title:Relationships between markers of neurologic and endothelial injury during critical illness and long-term cognitive impairment and disability.
[So] Source:Intensive Care Med;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1238
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Neurologic and endothelial injury biomarkers are associated with prolonged delirium during critical illness and may reflect injury pathways that lead to poor long-term outcomes. We hypothesized that blood-brain barrier (BBB), neuronal, and endothelial injury biomarkers measured during critical illness are associated with cognitive impairment and disability after discharge. METHODS: We enrolled adults with respiratory failure and/or shock and measured plasma concentrations of BBB (S100B), neuronal (UCHL1, BDNF), and endothelial (E-selectin, PAI-1) injury markers within 72 h of ICU admission. At 3 and 12 months post-discharge, we assessed participants' global cognition, executive function, and activities of daily living (ADL). We used multivariable regression to determine whether biomarkers were associated with outcomes after adjusting for relevant demographic and acute illness covariates. RESULTS: Our study included 419 survivors of critical illness with median age 59 years and APACHE II score 25. Higher S100B was associated with worse global cognition at 3 and 12 months (P = 0.008; P = 0.01). UCHL1 was nonlinearly associated with global cognition at 3 months (P = 0.02). Higher E-selectin was associated with worse global cognition (P = 0.006 at 3 months; P = 0.06 at 12 months). BDNF and PAI-1 were not associated with global cognition. No biomarkers were associated with executive function. Higher S100B (P = 0.05) and E-selectin (P = 0.02) were associated with increased disability in ADLs at 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: S100B, a marker of BBB and/or astrocyte injury, and E-selectin, an adhesion molecule and marker of endothelial injury, are associated with long-term cognitive impairment after critical illness, findings that may reflect mechanisms of critical illness brain injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00134-018-5120-1

  4 / 58791 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523153
[Au] Autor:Oude Lansink-Hartgring A; Dos Reis Miranda D; Donker DW; Maas JJ; Delnoij T; Kuijpers M; van den Brule J; Scholten E; Endeman H; Vlaar APJ; van den Bergh WM; Dutch ECLS study group
[Ad] Address:University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, PO box 30.001, 9700, RB, Groningen, the Netherlands. a.oudelansink@umcg.nl.
[Ti] Title:Cost-effectiveness in extracorporeal life support in critically ill adults in the Netherlands.
[So] Source:BMC Health Serv Res;18(1):172, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6963
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is used to support the cardiorespiratory function in case of severe cardiac and/or respiratory failure in critically ill patients. According to the ELSO guidelines ECLS should be considered when estimated mortality risk approximates 80%. ECLS seems an efficient therapy in terms of survival benefit, but no undisputed evidence is delivered yet. The aim of the study is to assess the health-related quality of life after ECLS treatment and its cost effectiveness. METHODS: We will perform a prospective observational cohort study. All adult patients who receive ECLS in the participating centers will be included. Exclusion criteria are patients in whom the ECLS is only used to bridge a procedure (like a high risk percutaneous coronary intervention or surgery) or the absence of informed consent. Data collection includes patient characteristics and data specific for ECLS treatment. Severity of illness and mortality risk is measured as precisely as possible using measurements for the appropriate age group and organ failure. For analyses on survival patients will act as their own control as we compare the actual survival with the estimated mortality on initiation of ECLS if conservative treatment would have been continued. Survivors are asked to complete validated questionnaires on health related quality of life (EQ5D-5 L) and on medical consumption and productivity losses (iMTA/iPCQ) at 6 and 12 months. Also the health related quality of life 1 month prior to ECLS initiation will be obtained by a questionnaire, if needed provided by relatives. With an estimated overall survival of 62% 210 patients need to be recruited to make a statement on cost effectiveness for all ECLS indications. DISCUSSION: If our hypothesis that ECLS treatment is cost-effective is confirmed by this prospective study this could lead to an even broader use of ECLS treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered at ( NCT02837419 ) registration date July 19, 2016 and with the Dutch trial register, http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=6599.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12913-018-2964-6

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[PMID]: 29285632
[Au] Autor:Reichman NE; Corman H; Noonan K; Jiménez ME
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics and Child Health Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 89 French St., Room 3272, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903, USA. reichmne@rwjms.rutgers.edu.
[Ti] Title:Infant Health and Future Childhood Adversity.
[So] Source:Matern Child Health J;22(3):318-326, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1573-6628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective To investigate the extent to which disabling infant health conditions are associated with adverse childhood experiences at age 5. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a national urban birth cohort. We estimated logistic regression models of associations between the presence of a disabling infant health condition and the child's ACE exposures at age 5, controlling for factors that preceded the child's birth, including the mother's sociodemographic characteristics, physical health, mental illness, and substance abuse and the parents' criminal justice system involvement and domestic violence or sexual abuse. ACEs included 4 categories of child maltreatment (physical, sexual, psychological abuse, neglect) and 5 categories of household dysfunction (father absence, substance use, mental illness, caregiver treated violently, incarceration). Results 3.3% of the children were characterized as having a disabling health condition that was likely present at birth. Logistic regression estimates indicate that having a disabling infant health condition was associated with 83% higher odds of the child experiencing 2 or more ACEs (AOR 1.83, CI 1.14-2.94) and 73% higher odds of the child experiencing 3 or more ACEs (AOR 1.73, CI 1.07-2.77) at age 5. Conclusions for Practice The finding of strong links between disabling infant health conditions and ACEs at age 5 suggests that child health and ACEs play intertwining and mutually reinforcing roles during the early lifecourse and highlights the critical importance of investing in systems that simultaneously promote optimal child development and address childhood adversity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10995-017-2418-5

  6 / 58791 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521908
[Au] Autor:Lentz JC
[Ad] Address:Judy C. Lentz, MSN, RN, FPCN, is an advanced practice palliative care nurse. She created the role of palliative care doula to serve people as they walk the journey to end of life. As a faith community nurse, Judy values her ministry in service to God.
[Ti] Title:An Innovative Role for Faith Community Nursing: Palliative Care Ministry.
[So] Source:J Christ Nurs;35(2):112-119, 2018 Apr/Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0743-2550
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although the specialty of palliative nursing and palliative care continues to grow in hospital and outpatient settings, a paucity of home-based palliative services remains. This article discusses a new paradigm of faith-based palliative care ministry using faith community nurses (FCNs). Under the leadership of a palliative care doula (a nurse expert in palliative care), nurses in the faith community can offer critical support to those with serious illness. Models such as this provide stimulating content for FCN practice and opportunity to broaden health ministry within faith communities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000478

  7 / 58791 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521868
[Au] Autor:Parsons K; Gaudine A; Swab M
[Ad] Address:School of Nursing, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Older nurses' experiences of providing direct care in hospital nursing units: a qualitative systematic review.
[So] Source:JBI Database System Rev Implement Rep;16(3):669-700, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2202-4433
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Most developed countries throughout the world are experiencing an aging nursing workforce as their population ages. Older nurses often experience different challenges then their younger nurse counterparts. With the increase in older nurses relative to younger nurses potentially available to work in hospitals, it is important to understand the experience of older nurses on high paced hospital nursing units. This understanding will lend knowledge to ways of lessening the loss of these highly skilled experienced workers and improve patient outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To identify, evaluate and synthesize the existing qualitative evidence on older nurses' experiences of providing direct care to patients in hospital nursing units. INCLUSION CRITERIA: The review considered studies which included registered nurses 45 years and over who work as direct caregivers in any type of in-patient hospital nursing unit. The phenomenon of interest was the experience of older nurses in providing direct nursing care in any type of in-patient hospital nursing unit (i.e. including but not limited to medical/surgical units, intensive care units, critical care units, perioperative units, palliative care units, obstetrical units, emergency departments and rehabilitative care units). The review excluded studies focussing entirely on enrolled nurses, licensed practical nurses and licensed vocational nurses. TYPES OF STUDIES: Qualitative data including, but not limited to the following methodologies: phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research. METHODS: The databases CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, AgeLine, Sociological Abstracts and SocINDEX were searched from inception; the search was conducted on October 13, 2017; no date limiters or language limiters were applied. Each paper was assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological quality using the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Critical Appraisal Checklist for Qualitative Research. Any disagreements that arose between the reviewers were resolved through discussion. Data extraction was conducted by two independent reviewers using the standardized qualitative data extraction tool from JBI. The qualitative research findings were pooled using JBI methodology. The JBI process of meta-aggregation was used to identify categories and synthesized findings. RESULTS: Twelve papers were included in the review. Three synthesized findings were extracted from 12 categories and 75 findings. The three synthesized findings extracted from the papers were: (1) Love of nursing: It's who I am and I love it; (2) It's a rewarding but challenging and changing job; it's a different job and it can be challenging; (3) It's a challenging job; can I keep up? CONCLUSIONS: Older nurses love nursing and have created an identity around their profession. They view their profession positively and believe their job to be unlike any other, yet they identify many ongoing challenges and changes. Despite their desire to continue in their role they are often faced with hardships that threaten their ability to stay at the bedside. A key role of hospital administrators to keep older nurses in the workplace is to develop programs to prevent work related illness and to promote health. Given the low ConQual scores in the current systematic review, additional research is recommended to understand the older nurses' experience in providing direct care in hospital nursing units as well as predicting health age of retirement and length of bedside nursing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11124/JBISRIR-2017-003372

  8 / 58791 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519954
[Au] Autor:Leaf DE; Siew ED; Eisenga MF; Singh K; Mc Causland FR; Srivastava A; Ikizler TA; Ware LB; Ginde AA; Kellum JA; Palevsky PM; Wolf M; Waikar SS
[Ad] Address:Due to the number of contributing authors, the affiliations are provided in the Supplemental Material. DELEAF@partners.org.
[Ti] Title:Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Associates with Death in Critically Ill Patients.
[So] Source:Clin J Am Soc Nephrol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1555-905X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Dysregulated mineral metabolism is a common and potentially maladaptive feature of critical illness, especially in patients with AKI, but its association with death has not been comprehensively investigated. We sought to determine whether elevated plasma levels of the osteocyte-derived, vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), are prospectively associated with death in critically ill patients with AKI requiring RRT, and in a general cohort of critically ill patients with and without AKI. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We measured plasma FGF23 and other mineral metabolite levels in two cohorts of critically ill patients ( =1527). We included 817 patients with AKI requiring RRT who enrolled in the ARF Trial Network (ATN) study, and 710 patients with and without AKI who enrolled in the Validating Acute Lung Injury biomarkers for Diagnosis (VALID) study. We hypothesized that higher FGF23 levels at enrollment are independently associated with higher 60-day mortality. RESULTS: In the ATN study, patients in the highest compared with lowest quartiles of C-terminal (cFGF23) and intact FGF23 (iFGF23) had 3.84 (95% confidence interval, 2.31 to 6.41) and 2.08 (95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 4.21) fold higher odds of death, respectively, after adjustment for demographics, comorbidities, and severity of illness. In contrast, plasma/serum levels of parathyroid hormone, vitamin D metabolites, calcium, and phosphate were not associated with 60-day mortality. In the VALID study, patients in the highest compared with lowest quartiles of cFGF23 and iFGF23 had 3.52 (95% confidence interval, 1.96 to 6.33) and 1.93 (95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 3.33) fold higher adjusted odds of death. CONCLUSIONS: Higher FGF23 levels are independently associated with greater mortality in critically ill patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 58791 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519557
[Au] Autor:Shanbhag ST; Choong B; Petrov M; Delahunt B; Windsor JA; Phillips ARJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; Applied Surgery and Metabolism Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Acute pancreatitis conditioned mesenteric lymph causes cardiac dysfunction in rats independent of hypotension.
[So] Source:Surgery;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1532-7361
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Critical illness including severe acute pancreatitis is associated with the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. The "gut-lymph" hypothesis states that multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is due to release of toxic factors from the intestine into the mesenteric lymph. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of normotensive acute pancreatitis conditioned mesenteric lymph on cardiac function and whether external drainage of mesenteric lymph would protect the heart. METHODS: Groups of normal rats and those with normotensive taurocholate induced acute pancreatitis, had either no lymphatic intervention or thoracic duct ligation and external drainage of mesenteric lymph. After 6 hours, the hearts were removed for ex vivo functional measurements, including cardiac output, ventricular contractility (+dP/dt), and relaxation (-dP/dt). In a second experiment, mesenteric lymph from normal rats and those with established acute pancreatitis was infused into ex vivo perfused normal working rat hearts to assess impact on cardiac function. Heart and lung tissues were collected for assessment of edema. RESULTS: Significant cardiac dysfunction, denoted by decreased cardiac output (21%), contractility (37%), relaxability (23%), and increased cardiac tissue edema (2-fold), developed in rats with established acute pancreatitis and no lymphatic intervention compared with the control group (all P < .05). Strikingly this cardiac dysfunction and edema was normalized in acute pancreatitis rats that had undergone prior thoracic duct ligation and external drainage of mesenteric lymph. In the second experiment, infusion of acute pancreatitis conditioned mesenteric lymph resulted in an immediate and significant similar magnitude decrease in of cardiac output (17%), contractility (22%), and relaxation (27%) compared with the infusion of normal lymph (all P <.05). CONCLUSION: Mesenteric lymph from normotensive acute pancreatitis animals caused significant cardiac dysfunction which could be prevented by thoracic duct ligation and external drainage of mesenteric lymph.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 58791 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519292
[Au] Autor:Fu H; Zhang Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Intensive Care Unit, the 309th Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100091, China. Corresponding author: Zhang Yuxiang, Email: 15810550308@163.com.
[Ti] Title:[Evaluation of platelet function in critically ill patients and its clinical significance].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue;30(3):284-288, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2095-4352
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Platelets play a pivotal role in the thromboembolic, inflammatory, and immunomodulatory process. The alteration of platelet quality often affects the treatment and prognosis of critically ill patients, and has a significant correlation with mortality. With the further research on the function of the platelet, it is found that the abnormal platelet quality can present during the early stage of the illness of the critically ill patients. In order to evaluate the alterations of the platelet quality more accurately, the further studies of platelet parameters, including platelet counts (PLT), platelet hematocrit (PCT), platelet large cell ratio (PLCR), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), immature platelet fraction (IPF) and so on, are still be the focus of current researches in the field of critical illness. At the same time, the application of thromboelastography/thrombelastography-platelet mapping (TEG/TEG MP) to the measurement of platelet function, especially the researches on the inhibitory rate of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and the inhibitory rate of arachidonic acid (AA), is the hot spot of current researches. With regard to the diagnosis, prognosis and early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) of the critically ill patients, it is important to comprehensively apply the methods of platelet function evaluation.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.2095-4352.2018.03.019


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