Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Cytophagaceae and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29028000
[Au] Autor:Mendes LW; Raaijmakers JM; de Hollander M; Mendes R; Tsai SM
[Ad] Address:Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture CENA, University of Sao Paulo USP, Piracicaba, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Influence of resistance breeding in common bean on rhizosphere microbiome composition and function.
[So] Source:ISME J;, 2017 Oct 13.
[Is] ISSN:1751-7370
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The rhizosphere microbiome has a key role in plant growth and health, providing a first line of defense against root infections by soil-borne pathogens. Here, we investigated the composition and metabolic potential of the rhizobacterial community of different common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cultivars with variable levels of resistance to the fungal root pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Fox). For the different bean cultivars grown in two soils with contrasting physicochemical properties and microbial diversity, rhizobacterial abundance was positively correlated with Fox resistance. Pseudomonadaceae, bacillaceae, solibacteraceae and cytophagaceae were more abundant in the rhizosphere of the Fox-resistant cultivar. Network analyses showed a modular topology of the rhizosphere microbiome of the Fox-resistant cultivar, suggesting a more complex and highly connected bacterial community than in the rhizosphere of the Fox-susceptible cultivar. Metagenome analyses further revealed that specific functional traits such as protein secretion systems and biosynthesis genes of antifungal phenazines and rhamnolipids were more abundant in the rhizobacterial community of the Fox-resistant cultivar. Our findings suggest that breeding for Fox resistance in common bean may have co-selected for other unknown plant traits that support a higher abundance of specific beneficial bacterial families in the rhizosphere with functional traits that reinforce the first line of defense.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 13 October 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.158.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171013
[Lr] Last revision date:171013
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/ismej.2017.158

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[PMID]: 26047488
[Au] Autor:Certner RH; Vollmer SV
[Ad] Address:Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University, Nahant, Massachusetts, USA.
[Ti] Title:Evidence for Autoinduction and Quorum Sensing in White Band Disease-Causing Microbes on Acropora cervicornis.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;5:11134, 2015 Jun 05.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Coral reefs have entered a state of global decline party due to an increasing incidence of coral disease. However, the diversity and complexity of coral-associated bacterial communities has made identifying the mechanisms underlying disease transmission and progression extremely difficult. This study explores the effects of coral cell-free culture fluid (CFCF) and autoinducer (a quorum sensing signaling molecule) on coral-associated bacterial growth and on coral tissue loss respectively. All experiments were conducted using the endangered Caribbean coral Acropora cervicornis. Coral-associated microbes were grown on selective media infused with CFCF derived from healthy and white band disease-infected A. cervicornis. Exposure to diseased CFCF increased proliferation of Cytophaga-Flavobacterium spp. while exposure to healthy CFCF inhibited growth of this group. Exposure to either CFCF did not significantly affect Vibrio spp. growth. In order to test whether disease symptoms can be induced in healthy corals, A. cervicornis was exposed to bacterial assemblages supplemented with exogenous, purified autoinducer. Incubation with autoinducer resulted in complete tissue loss in all corals tested in less than one week. These findings indicate that white band disease in A. cervicornis may be caused by opportunistic pathogenesis of resident microbes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anthozoa/microbiology
Cytophaga/physiology
Quorum Sensing/physiology
Vibrio/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: 4-Butyrolactone/analogs & derivatives
4-Butyrolactone/toxicity
Animals
Anthozoa/drug effects
Cytophaga/growth & development
Cytophagaceae Infections/pathology
Cytophagaceae Infections/veterinary
Vibrio/growth & development
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:1192-20-7 (homoserine lactone); OL659KIY4X (4-Butyrolactone)
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150606
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep11134

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[PMID]: 21848120
[Au] Autor:van Gelderen R; Carson J; Nowak B
[Ad] Address:National Centre for Marine Conservation & Resource Sustainability, University of Tasmania, Locked Bag 1370 Launceston, Tasmania 7250, Australia. rvangeld@utas.edu.au
[Ti] Title:Experimentally induced marine flexibacteriosis in Atlantic salmon smolts Salmo salar. II. Pathology.
[So] Source:Dis Aquat Organ;95(2):125-35, 2011 Jun 16.
[Is] ISSN:0177-5103
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The fish disease marine flexibacteriosis is characterised by necrotic lesions on the body, head, fins, and occasionally gills, with erosive lesions on the external surface as the prominent clinical sign. In Australia, the main species affected are Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in sea-cage culture in Tasmania. Using a dose-dependent trial to determine pathology, 2 forms of the disease were noted in Atlantic salmon. The acute form occurs within 2 to 3 d after inoculation at high doses (1 x 10(8) cells ml(-1)) and is characterised by the disintegration of the epithelium. The chronic form of the disease began as small superficial blisters of the epidermis, which develop into ulcerative lesions that leave musculature exposed. The predominant lesion sites were the dorsum and pectoral fins. Jaws were commonly affected, and gill necrosis was also noted. Behaviour of Atlantic salmon as well as the conditions under which they were kept contribute to the size and distribution of lesions observed. Lack of an inflammatory response in pathology and rapid and destructive mortalities observed in higher inoculum doses suggested a role of toxins in the pathogenesis of Tenacibaculum maritimum. This is the first study to examine the development of marine flexibacteriosis lesions and to utilise immunohistochemistry to verify that the bacteria observed in histology was T. maritimum.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cytophagaceae Infections/veterinary
Cytophagaceae/classification
Fish Diseases/microbiology
Salmo salar
Skin Diseases, Bacterial/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cytophagaceae Infections/microbiology
Cytophagaceae Infections/pathology
Extremities/microbiology
Extremities/pathology
Fish Diseases/pathology
Gills/microbiology
Gills/pathology
Skin/pathology
Skin Diseases, Bacterial/pathology
Tail/microbiology
Tail/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1109
[Cu] Class update date: 111117
[Lr] Last revision date:111117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:110819
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3354/dao02329

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[PMID]: 18159670
[Au] Autor:Jones MA; Powell MD; Becker JA; Carter CG
[Ad] Address:School of Aquaculture, Aquafin CRC, Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute, University of Tasmania, Locked Bag 1370, Launceston, Tasmania 7250, Australia. matthewj@utas.edu.au
[Ti] Title:Effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection and feed deprivation on the metabolic rate of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.
[So] Source:Dis Aquat Organ;78(1):29-36, 2007 Oct 31.
[Is] ISSN:0177-5103
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this study, experiments were conducted to examine the effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection on the metabolic rate (M(O2)) of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Fed and unfed Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to a high concentration (5 x 10(12) CFU ml(-1)) of the bacteria Tenacibaculum maritimum, their routine and maximum metabolic rates (M(O2rout) and M(O2max), respectively) were measured, and relative metabolic scope determined. A significant decrease in metabolic scope was found for both fed and unfed infected groups. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM) decrease of 2.21 +/- 0.97 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed fish a mean +/- SEM decrease of 3.16 +/- 1.29 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). The decrease in metabolic scope was a result of significantly increased M(O2rout) of both fed and unfed infected salmon. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase in M(O2rout) of 1.86 +/- 0.66 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase of 2.16 +/- 0.72 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). Interestingly, all groups maintained M(O2max) regardless of infection status. Increases in M(O2rout) corresponded to a significant increase in blood plasma osmolality. A decrease in metabolic scope has implications for how individuals allocate energy; fish with smaller metabolic scope will have less energy to allocate to functions such as growth, reproduction and immune response, which may adversely affect the efficiency of fish growth.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cytophagaceae Infections/veterinary
Fish Diseases/metabolism
Fish Diseases/microbiology
Flexibacter/growth & development
Food Deprivation
Salmon/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cytophagaceae Infections/metabolism
Cytophagaceae Infections/microbiology
Energy Metabolism
Gills/microbiology
Necrosis
Oxygen Consumption
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:0802
[Cu] Class update date: 111117
[Lr] Last revision date:111117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:071228
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 2395498
[Au] Autor:Krol-van Straaten MJ; Landheer JE; de Maat CE
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein.
[Ti] Title:Beware of the dog: meningitis in a splenectomised woman.
[So] Source:Neth J Med;36(5-6):301-3, 1990 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:0300-2977
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purulent meningitis was diagnosed in a 75-yr-old splenectomised woman nine days after a dog bite. The original wound was apparently uninflamed. The causative microorganism proved to be a dysgonic fermenter 2 (DF-2) bacterium (renamed Capnocythophaga canimorsus). This is a recently recognised Gram-negative bacterium, belonging to the normal canine mouth flora, to which asplenic individuals seem to be particularly susceptible.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Infections
Bites and Stings/complications
Capnocytophaga
Cytophagaceae
Dogs
Meningitis/etiology
Splenectomy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Animals
Bacterial Infections/drug therapy
Capnocytophaga/isolation & purification
Capnocytophaga/pathogenicity
Chloramphenicol/therapeutic use
Cytophagaceae/isolation & purification
Cytophagaceae/pathogenicity
Female
Humans
Meningitis/drug therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:66974FR9Q1 (Chloramphenicol)
[Em] Entry month:9010
[Cu] Class update date: 131121
[Lr] Last revision date:131121
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:900601
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 2364847
[Au] Autor:Mello KA; Snydman DR; Arora S
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02111.
[Ti] Title:Capnocytophaga infection involving a portal-systemic vascular shunt.
[So] Source:Dig Dis Sci;35(7):909-11, 1990 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0163-2116
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Capnocytophaga sp., a microaerophilic gram-negative isolate of the human oral cavity, has previously been reported to cause sinusitis, empyema, wound infections, conjunctivitis, subphrenic abscess, osteomyelitis, bacteremia, cervical abscess, and endocarditis. We report the unusual case of infection with this organism at the anastamotic site of a splenorenal portosystemic vascular shunt. In this case, the pathogenesis is presumed to be bacteremia related to mucosal trauma from endoscopic injection sclerotherapy or bacteremia secondary to dental infection. The characteristics and antibiotic sensitivities of Capnocytophaga are reviewed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Infections/etiology
Capnocytophaga/isolation & purification
Cytophagaceae/isolation & purification
Portasystemic Shunt, Surgical
Surgical Wound Infection/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Esophageal and Gastric Varices/therapy
Female
Humans
Immune Tolerance
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary/surgery
Middle Aged
Sclerotherapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:9008
[Cu] Class update date: 170822
[Lr] Last revision date:170822
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:900701
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 2363753
[Au] Autor:Howell JM; Woodward GR
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Joint Military Medical Command (JMMC), San Antonio, TX.
[Ti] Title:Precipitous hypotension in the emergency department caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus sp nov sepsis.
[So] Source:Am J Emerg Med;8(4):312-4, 1990 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0735-6757
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 20-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with an injured right hand, fever, and a history of dog exposure. This splenectomized individual developed hypotension less than 90 minutes after arriving in the ED with normal vital signs. He later developed overwhelming sepsis, gangrene, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), respiratory insufficiency, retroperitoneal hematoma, and renal insufficiency. Blood cultures grew Capnocytophaga canimorsus sp nov (formerly Dysgonic Fermenter-2). Sepsis, gangrene, and DIC are more likely to occur in asplenic individuals exposed to this organism. Many physicians use prophylactic outpatient penicillin therapy in asplenic or functionally asplenic victims of dog and cat bites. However, a brief admission or stay in an observation unit may be indicated for these high-risk individuals.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Infections/complications
Capnocytophaga
Cytophagaceae
Hypotension/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections/drug therapy
Dogs
Emergencies
Humans
Male
Risk Factors
Splenectomy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:9008
[Cu] Class update date: 171118
[Lr] Last revision date:171118
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:900701
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 2309871
[Au] Autor:Ticho BH; Urban RC; Safran MJ; Saggau DD
[Ad] Address:Chicago Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois 60612.
[Ti] Title:Capnocytophaga keratitis associated with poor dentition and human immunodeficiency virus infection.
[So] Source:Am J Ophthalmol;109(3):352-3, 1990 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:0002-9394
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/complications
Capnocytophaga
Cytophagaceae
Dental Caries/complications
Eye Infections, Bacterial/etiology
Keratitis/etiology
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: AIDS Serodiagnosis
Adult
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:9004
[Cu] Class update date: 170908
[Lr] Last revision date:170908
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM; X
[Da] Date of entry for processing:900315
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 2305182
[Au] Autor:Baquero F; Fernández J; Dronda F; Erice A; Pérez de Oteiza J; Reguera JA; Reig M
[Ad] Address:Service of Microbiology Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Capnophilic and anaerobic bacteremia in neutropenic patients: an oral source.
[So] Source:Rev Infect Dis;12 Suppl 2:S157-60, 1990 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0162-0886
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The currently accepted empiric antibiotic therapy for bacterial infections in neutropenic patients may not cover the possibility of capnophilic and anaerobic bacteremia. Many of these infections develop in patients with severe mucositis or periodontitis, and the type of organisms recovered also suggests an oral source of infection. We present two cases of bacteremia in neutropenic patients who had been empirically treated with ceftazidime and piperacillin plus amikacin. In the first case a beta-lactamase-producing strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was isolated; in the second case bacteremia was due to a mixture of Leptotrichia buccalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. These observations emphasize the necessity for a reevaluation of the possible use of antimicrobial agents active against beta-lactamase-producing capnophilic organisms and anaerobic bacteria during empiric therapy in neutropenic patients with an oral source of infection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Agranulocytosis/complications
Bacteroidaceae/isolation & purification
Capnocytophaga/isolation & purification
Cytophagaceae/isolation & purification
Fusobacterium Infections/etiology
Neutropenia/complications
Sepsis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Bacteroidaceae/drug effects
Capnocytophaga/drug effects
Female
Fusobacterium/drug effects
Fusobacterium/isolation & purification
Fusobacterium Infections/complications
Fusobacterium Infections/microbiology
Humans
Male
Sepsis/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:9003
[Cu] Class update date: 111117
[Lr] Last revision date:111117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:900101
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 2301546
[Au] Autor:de Smet MD; Chan CC; Nussenblatt RB; Palestine AG
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892.
[Ti] Title:Capnocytophaga canimorsus as the cause of a chronic corneal infection.
[So] Source:Am J Ophthalmol;109(2):240-2, 1990 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:0002-9394
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Capnocytophaga/isolation & purification
Corneal Diseases/etiology
Cytophagaceae/isolation & purification
Eye Infections, Bacterial/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Capnocytophaga/drug effects
Cefazolin/therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Corneal Diseases/drug therapy
Dogs/microbiology
Eye Infections, Bacterial/drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Visual Acuity
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:IHS69L0Y4T (Cefazolin)
[Em] Entry month:9003
[Cu] Class update date: 170908
[Lr] Last revision date:170908
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:900215
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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