Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Daucus and Carota [Words]
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  1 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516673
[Au] Autor:Vuts J; Woodcock CM; Caulfield JC; Powers SJ; Pickett JA; Birkett MA
[Ad] Address:Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Isolation and identification of host floral attractants for the dried bean beetle, Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae).
[So] Source:Pest Manag Sci;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4998
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The response of virgin females of the legume pest Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) to headspace extracts of volatiles collected from flowers of a nectar plant, Daucus carota, was investigated using behaviour (four-arm olfactometry) and coupled gas chromatography-electrophysiology (GC-EAG). RESULTS: Odours from inflorescences were significantly more attractive to virgin female beetles than clean air. Similarly, a sample of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) collected by air entrainment (dynamic headspace collection) was more attractive to beetles than a solvent control. In coupled GC-EAG experiments with beetle antennae and the VOC extract, six components showed EAG activity. Using coupled GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC peak enhancement with authentic standards, the components were identified as α-pinene (S:R 16:1), sabinene, myrcene, limonene (S:R 1:3), terpinolene and (S)-bornyl acetate. Females preferred the synthetic blend of D. carota EAG-active volatiles to the solvent control in bioassays. When compared directly, odours of D. carota inflorescences elicited stronger positive behaviour than the synthetic blend. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of behaviourally active volatiles linked to pollen location for A. obtectus, and development of the six-component blend is being pursued, which could underpin the design of semiochemical-based field management approaches against this major pest of stored products.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ps.4903

  2 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29415544
[Au] Autor:Zabaleta I; Bizkarguenaga E; Nunoo DBO; Schultes L; Leonel J; Prieto A; Zuloaga O; Benskin JP
[Ad] Address:Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology , University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) , Bilbao , Spain.
[Ti] Title:Biodegradation and Uptake of the Pesticide Sulfluramid in a Soil-Carrot Mesocosm.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Technol;52(5):2603-2611, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1520-5851
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:N-ethyl perfluorooctane sulfonamide (EtFOSA) is the active ingredient of Sulfluramid, a pesticide which is used extensively in South America for control of leaf-cutting ants. Despite being a known precursor to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), the importance of EtFOSA as a source of environmental PFOS remains unclear. In the present work, uptake, leaching, and biodegradation of EtFOSA and its transformation products were assessed over 81 days in soil-carrot ( Daucus carota ssp sativus) mesocosms for the first time. Experiments performed in the presence of carrot produced PFOS yields of up to 34% using a technical EtFOSA standard and up to 277% using Grão Forte, a commercial Sulfluramid bait formulation containing 0.0024% EtFOSA. Perfluorooctane sulfonamido acetate (FOSAA), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA), and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) also formed over the course of the experiments, with the latter substance attributed to the presence of perfluorooctanamide impurities. The leachate contained low levels of transformation products and a high FOSA:PFOS ratio, consistent with recent observations in Brazilian surface water. In carrots, the more hydrophilic transformation products (e.g., PFOS) occurred primarily in the leaves, while the more hydrophobic products (e.g., FOSA, FOSAA, and EtFOSA) occurred in the peel and core. Remarkably, isomer-specific analysis revealed that the linear EtFOSA isomer biodegraded significantly faster than branched isomers. These data collectively show that the application of Sulfluramid baits can lead to the occurrence of PFOS in crops and in the surrounding environment, in considerably higher yields than previously thought.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.est.7b03876

  3 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29485125
[Au] Autor:Joseph JT; Poolakkalody NJ; Shah JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Science, Central University of Kerala, Padannakkad, Kasaragod 671 314, India.
[Ti] Title:Plant reference genes for development and stress response studies.
[So] Source:J Biosci;43(1):173-187, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0973-7138
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many reference genes are used by different laboratories for gene expression analyses to indicate the relative amount of input RNA/DNA in the experiment. These reference genes are supposed to show least variation among the treatments and with the control sets in a given experiment. However, expression of reference genes varies significantly from one set of experiment to the other. Thus, selection of reference genes depends on the experimental conditions. Sometimes the average expression of two or three reference genes is taken as standard. This review consolidated the details of about 120 genes attempted for normalization during comparative expression analysis in 16 different plants. Plant species included in this review are Arabidopsis thaliana, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum), soybean (Glycine max), rice (Oryza sativa), blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), wheat (Triticum aestivum), potato (Solanum tuberosum), sugar cane (Saccharum sp.), carrot (Daucus carota), coffee (Coffea arabica), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa) and grape (Vitis vinifera). The list includes model and cultivated crop plants from both monocot and dicot classes. We have categorized plant-wise the reference genes that have been used for expression analyses in any or all of the four different conditions such as biotic stress, abiotic stress, developmental stages and various organs and tissues, reported till date. This review serves as a guide during the reference gene hunt for gene expression analysis studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29497811
[Au] Autor:Wang F; Wang GL; Hou XL; Li MY; Xu ZS; Xiong AS
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, College of Horticulture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, China.
[Ti] Title:The genome sequence of 'Kurodagosun', a major carrot variety in Japan and China, reveals insights into biological research and carrot breeding.
[So] Source:Mol Genet Genomics;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1617-4623
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is one of the most economically important root vegetables in the world, providing numerous nutrients for human health. China is the largest country of carrot production in the world, and 'Kurodagosun' has been a major carrot variety in China. Carrot material used in this study was the inbred line 'DC-27', which was derived by forced selfing from 'Kurodagosun'. To understand the genetic system and plant-specific genes of 'Kurodagosun', we report the draft genome sequence of carrot 'DC-27' assembled using a combination of Roche454 and HiSeq 2000 sequencing technologies to achieve 32-fold genome coverage. A total of 31,891 predicted genes were identified. These assembled sequences provide candidate genes involved in biological processes including stress response and carotenoid biosynthesis. Genomic sequences corresponding to 371.6 Mb was less than 473 Mb, which is the estimated genome size. The availability of a draft sequence of the 'DC-27' genome advances knowledge on the biological research and breeding of carrot, as well as other Apiaceae plants. The 'DC-27' genome sequence data also provide a new resource to explore the evolution of other higher plants.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00438-018-1428-3

  5 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29493459
[Au] Autor:Karkute SG; Koley TK; Yengkhom BK; Tripathi A; Srivastava S; Maurya A; Singh B
[Ad] Address:ICAR-Indian Institute of Vegetable Research, Division of Crop Improvement, Indian Institute of Vegetable Research, Varanasi- 221305. India.
[Ti] Title:Anti-diabetic phenolic compounds of black carrot (Daucus carota subspecies sativus var. atrorubens Alef.) inhibit enzymes of glucose metabolism: An in silico and in vitro validation.
[So] Source:Med Chem;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1875-6638
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Black carrot is known to be effective against Type 2 diabetes. The phenolic compounds present in black carrot are responsible for this property, but limited information was available about the mechanism of action and target enzymes. OBJECTIVE: The present study aims at understanding molecular interactions of phenolic compounds of black carrot with enzymes involved in glucose metabolism in human to identify the potential inhibitor that can be used as candidate drug molecule to control diabetes. METHOD: In vitro assay for inhibition of α-amylase, α-glucosidase and DPP-IV was carried out using black carrot purified extract and the standard inhibitor acarbose and vildagliptin recpectively. The inhibition activity of selected phenolic compounds was also studied by in silico docking with all these three enzymes for the proper understanding of interactions. Encapsulation of purified black carrot extract was also carried out. RESULTS: In in vitro IC50 value of purified extract was found better than standard inhibitor acarbose for α-amylase and α-glucosidase, and vildagliptin for DPP-IV. Similarly, docking scores of few anthocyanin molecules were found higher than their respective inhibitors suggesting more effective inhibition. Among anthocyanin molecules of black carrot, cyanidin 3-xylosyl galactoside was found to be potential drug to inhibit these enzymes whereas Dipeptidyl peptidase IV was identified as the best target to control diabetes with anthocyanins of black carrot. CONCLUSION: Anthocyanins from black carrot were found to be effective to control diabetes and very first time we propose that Cyaniding 3-xylosyl galactoside is the best potential molecule for inhibiting enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. The study also shows the encapsulation of anthocyanin compounds using ß-cyclodextrin.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/1573406414666180301092819

  6 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29446831
[Au] Autor:Mas F; Harper A; Horner R; Welsh T; Jaksons P; Suckling DM
[Ad] Address:The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, Gerald St, Lincoln, 7608, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:The importance of key floral bioactive compounds to honey bees for the detection and attraction of hybrid vegetable crops and increased seed yield.
[So] Source:J Sci Food Agric;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0010
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Crop breeding programmes generally select for traits for improved yield and human consumption preferences. Yet, they often overlook one fundamental trait essential for insect-pollinated crops: Pollinator attraction. This is even more critical for hybrid plants that rely on cross-pollination between the male-fertile line and the male-sterile line to set seeds. We investigated the role of floral odours for honey bee pollination that could explain the poor seed yield in hybrid crops. RESULTS: We identified for three vegetable hybrid crops the key floral bioactive compounds that honey bees detect. We found that 30% of the variation in bioactive compounds quantities was explained by variety. Differences in quantities of the bioactive compounds triggered different degrees of olfactory response and were also associated with varied appetitive response. Correlating the abundance of each bioactive compound with seed yield, we found that aldehydes like nonanal and decanal can have a strong negative influence on seed yield with increasing quantity. CONCLUSION: Using these methodologies to identify relevant bioactive compounds associated with honey bee pollination, plant breeding programmes should also consider selecting for floral traits attractive to honey bees to improve crop pollination for enhanced seed yield.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/jsfa.8967

  7 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29304728
[Au] Autor:Liu YJ; Wang GL; Ma J; Xu ZS; Wang F; Xiong AS
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, College of Horticulture, Nanjing Agricultural University, 1 Weigang, Nanjing, 210095, China.
[Ti] Title:Transcript profiling of sucrose synthase genes involved in sucrose metabolism among four carrot (Daucus carota L.) cultivars reveals distinct patterns.
[So] Source:BMC Plant Biol;18(1):8, 2018 01 05.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2229
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Carrot which contains lots of nutrients has a large demand around the world. The soluble sugar content in fleshy root of carrot directly influences its taste and quality. Sucrose, as an important member of soluble sugar, is the main product of photosynthesis in higher plants and it plays pivotal roles in physiological processes including energy supply, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, starch and cellulose synthesis, and stress tolerance. Sucrose synthase is a key enzyme involved in sucrose metabolism and is closely related to sucrose content. However, the molecular mechanism involved in sucrose metabolism in carrot has lagged behind. RESULTS: Here, carrot roots of five developmental stages from four carrot cultivars were collected, and the contents of soluble sugar and sucrose in different stages and cultivars were surveyed. Three DcSus genes (DcSus1, DcSus2, and DcSus3), with lengths of 2427 bp, 2454 bp and 2628 bp, respectively, were identified and cloned in carrot. Phylogenetic analysis from the deduced amino acid sequences suggested that three DcSus were clustered into three distinct groups (SUSI, II and III). Results of enzymatic profiles demonstrated that the DcSus activities showed decrease trends during taproot development. Correlation analysis indicated that the DcSus activity showed negative correlation with soluble sugar content and strong negative correlation with sucrose concentration. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression profiles of the DcSus genes are significantly different in carrot tissues (root, leaf blade, and petiole), and the expression levels of the DcSus genes in the leaf blade were much higher than that in the root and petiole. The expression profiles of DcSus genes showed strong negative correlation with both sucrose content and soluble sugar content. CONCLUSIONS: During carrot root development, the soluble sugar content and sucrose content showed increasing trends, while DcSus activities had persisting declinations, which may be due to the decreasing expression levels of genes encoding sucrose synthase. Our data demonstrate that synthesis of sucrose in carrot tissue is closely related with DcSus genes. The results from our study would not only provide effective insights of sucrose metabolism in carrot, but also are beneficial for biologists to improve carrot quality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12870-017-1221-1

  8 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29402560
[Au] Autor:Rygula A; Oleszkiewicz T; Grzebelus E; Pacia MZ; Baranska M; Baranski R
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 2, 30-387 Krakow, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Raman, AFM and SNOM high resolution imaging of carotene crystals in a model carrot cell system.
[So] Source:Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3557
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Three non-destructive and complementary techniques, Raman imaging, Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy were used simultaneously to show for the first time chemical and structural differences of carotenoid crystals. Spectroscopic and microscopic scanning probe measurements were applied to the released crystals or to crystals accumulated in a unique, carotenoids rich callus tissue growing in vitro that is considered as a new model system for plant carotenoid research. Three distinct morphological crystal types of various carotenoid composition were identified, a needle-like, rhomboidal and helical. Raman imaging using 532 and 488 nm excitation lines provided evidence that the needle-like and rhomboidal crystals had similar carotenoid composition and that they were composed mainly of ß-carotene accompanied by α-carotene. However, the presence of α-carotene was not identified in the helical crystals, which had the characteristic spatial structure. AFM measurements of crystals identified by Raman imaging revealed the crystal topography and showed the needle-like and rhomboidal crystals were planar but they differed in all three dimensions. Combining SNOM and Raman imaging enabled indication of carotenoid rich structures and visualised their distribution in the cell. The morphology of identified subcellular structures was characteristic for crystalline, membraneous and tubular chromoplasts that are plant organelles responsible for carotenoid accumulation in cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29382236
[Au] Autor:Deshmane S; Deshmane S; Shelke S; Biyani K
[Ad] Address:a Department of Pharmaceutics , Anuradha College of Pharmacy , Chikhli , India.
[Ti] Title:Enhancement of solubility and bioavailability of ambrisentan by solid dispersion using Daucus carota as a drug carrier: formulation, characterization, in vitro, and in vivo study.
[So] Source:Drug Dev Ind Pharm;:1-11, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1520-5762
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ambrisentan is an US FDA approved drug, it is the second oral endothelin A receptor antagonist known for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, but its oral administration is limited due to its poor water solubility. Hence, the objective of the investigation was focused on enhancement of solubility and bioavailability of ambrisentan by solid dispersion technique using natural Daucus carota extract as drug carrier. Drug carrier was evaluated for solubility, swelling index, viscosity, angle of repose, hydration capacity, and acute toxicity test (LD ). Ambrisentan was studied for the saturation solubility, phase solubility, and Gibbs free energy change. Compatibility of drug and the natural carrier was confirmed by DSC, FTIR, and XRD. Solid dispersions were evaluated for drug content, solubility, morphology, in vitro, and in vivo study. Screening of the natural carrier showed the desirable properties like water solubility, less swelling index, less viscosity, and acute toxicity study revealed no any clinical symptoms of toxicity. Drug and carrier interaction study confirmed the compatibility to consider its use in the formulation. Formed particles were found to be spherical with smooth surface. In vitro studies revealed higher drug release from the solid dispersion than that of the physical mixture. Bioavailability study confirms the increased absorption and bioavailability by oral administration of solid dispersion. Hence, it can be concluded that the natural Daucus carota extract can be the better alternative source for the preparation of solid dispersion and/or other dosage forms for improving solubility and bioavailability.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/03639045.2018.1428339

  10 / 2049 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28467186
[Au] Autor:Zhang Y; Chen H; Critzer F; Davidson PM; Zhong Q
[Ad] Address:Department of Food Science and Technology, 2510 River Drive, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA.
[Ti] Title:Potential of Cinnamon Oil Emulsions as Alternative Washing Solutions of Carrots.
[So] Source:J Food Prot;80(6):994-1001, 2017 06.
[Is] ISSN:1944-9097
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of cinnamon oil emulsions as alternative washing solutions to improve the microbial safety of carrots. Whey protein concentrate (WPC), gum arabic (GA), lecithin, and their combinations were used to prepare cinnamon oil emulsions. The emulsions were characterized for their hydrodynamic diameter (D ) during 7 days of storage and their antimicrobial activity against cocktails of Salmonella enterica , Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes . The D of the emulsion prepared with the GA+WPC blend did not change significantly (195.0 to 184.1 nm), whereas all other emulsions showed varying degrees of increases in D . Compared with free cinnamon oil dissolved in 5% ethanol, all emulsions showed similar or lower MICs and MBCs. Emulsions prepared with GA and equal masses of GA and WPC were chosen and diluted to 0.2 and 0.5% cinnamon oil to wash carrots that were surface inoculated with bacterial cocktails because of their lower MICs and MBCs than free oil. Emulsions resulted in significantly higher reductions of pathogens on carrots than free cinnamon oil, 3.0 to 3.7 versus 2.1 to 2.3 log CFU/g at 0.5% cinnamon oil and 2.0 to 3.0 versus 1.0 to 1.7 log CFU/g at 0.2% cinnamon oil. No transfer of bacteria from inoculated carrots to wash solutions and no effects of organic load on log reductions were only observed for wash treatments with 0.5% emulsified cinnamon oil. Thus, the cinnamon oil emulsions are potential alternative postharvest washing solutions for fresh produce production.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Daucus carota
Emulsions
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology
Cinnamomum zeylanicum
Colony Count, Microbial
Escherichia coli O157/drug effects
Food Microbiology
Listeria monocytogenes/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Infective Agents); 0 (Emulsions)
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 180202
[Lr] Last revision date:180202
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-16-359


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